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WSAUA Annual Meeting Key Note Speaker!

Save the Date! 91st Annual Meeting - Oct. 25-29, 2015
Indian Wells, CA.
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WESTERN SECTION UPDATE


Important Dates to Know
  • April 1 - Hotel Reservations Registration Opens
  • June 10 - Abstract Deadline
  • Oct. 25-29 - Plan Now to Join the Top Experts in the West for the Best Week in Urology
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UROLOGY INDUSTRY NEWS
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword Urology.


Half of Adults will Get Chronic Kidney Disease, Model Predicts
The Washington Post
A new model predicts that about half of all people aged 30 and older in the United States will develop chronic kidney disease during their lifetimes, a surprisingly large proportion for a condition that is not on the radar screens of many Americans. Writing in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases Monday, a team of researchers concluded that 54 percent of people between the ages of 30 and 49 will develop the disease. The figure is 52 percent for people between the ages of 50 and 64, and 42 percent for those 65 and older.
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PersonalizeDx - Your service lab for personalized DIAGNOSTIC, PROGNOSTIC and PREDICTIVE test results.
PersonalizeDx
We serve the molecular testing needs of Urologists and Pathologists, and other reference laboratories, with a specialized emphasis in proprietary testing for Prostate and Bladder Cancer patients. Our area of particular focus is the early detection of genomic changes, through Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) technology, that may detect cancer, measure the potential aggressiveness of the disease, as well as identify patients most likely to respond to targeted therapies. We offer flexible testing solutions that are tailored to each client's needs.
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Promoted by PersonalizeDx


Home Walking Program Improves Erectile Function After MI
Medical Xpress
For men with recent acute myocardial infarction, a home-based walking program is associated with a reduction in reported erectile dysfunction (ED), according to a study published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology. The researchers found that, compared with baseline, after 30 days there was a 9 percent increase in ED in the control group (P = 0.08).
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RT Commonly Prescribed Regardless of Ca Stage, PSA Level
Urology Times
Radiation therapy is often prescribed to prostate cancer patients regardless of cancer stage, PSA level, cancer grade, or the patient’s life expectancy. And referral to a radiation oncologist is the most significant predictor of whether or not these patients receive radiation therapy, according to a recent study that one expert says speaks to poor patient counseling by physicians.
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Metformin May Reduce Prostate Cancer Recurrence Risk
Renal & Urology News
Metformin may decrease the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) among men treated for prostate cancer (PCa), according to a recent systematic review and meta-analysis. Investigators pooled results from eight retrospective cohort studies and one case-control study published before August 2014. They found that the drug was associated with a marginal 18 percent decreased risk of BCR and an approximately 50 percent reduction in the BCR risk among men who received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the researchers reported online ahead of print in Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Disease.
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HEALTHCARE NEWS


When Health Care is Far from Home
Kaiser Health News
Jeff Clarke, 58-year-old, has Lyme, acquired long ago from deer ticks that dwell in the region's sprawling forests. But today he’s going to ask about a lump that's been growing in his left breast. It's starting to hurt, and he's worried. His fellow riders list their own ailments matter-of-factly: Asthma, dental decay, diabetes, drug addiction, heart disease and much more.
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Top Hospitals for 2015
Healthgrades
The top hospitals in America have in common a combination of collaboration, evidence-based decisions and vision, according to the latest rankings released by Healthgrades. The annual list ranks both the top 50 hospitals in America — scoring in the top 1 percent of hospitals for wide-ranging clinical excellence for at least six consecutive years — and the top 100 hospitals — those scoring in the top 2 percent of hospitals for wide-ranging clinical excellence for at least three consecutive years.
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CMS Offers Training, Testing Tips for ICD-10 Implementation
EHR Intelligence
Healthcare providers across the nation have started preparing for ICD-10 implementation in order to be ready for the Oct. 1 deadline. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services continue to offer a multitude of resources, training sessions, and ICD-10 testing opportunities for providers who are struggling with the new coding system.
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Patient Demands and Requests for Cancer Tests and Treatments
JAMA Oncology
In 2014, total U.S. healthcare expenditures were over $3 trillion. Physicians tend to attribute high healthcare costs to lawyers, insurers, drug companies, and patients rather than themselves. Physicians often contend that malpractice suits force them to practice defensive medicine. Similarly, it is claimed that the proliferation of information on the Internet and consumerism induce patients to demand expensive tests and treatments. The researchers found that, compared with baseline, after 30 days there was a 9 percent increase in ED in the control group (P = 0.08).
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Gilead's Pill Can Stop HIV. So Why Does Almost Nobody Take It?
Bloomberg
Truvada, Gilead's HIV drug, has been approved since 2004 for people with the virus. In 2012, use was expanded to people without HIV as a way of preventing transmission — a practice called PrEP, or pre-exposure prophylaxis. Taken daily, it can prevent infections 92 percent of the time, meaning it could drastically reduce new infections in sexually active gay men, among the U.S.'s highest-risk communities.
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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT


Violence in Medical America
Sheldon H F Marks, M.D. and William M. Schiff, M.D. Security Consultants
Editor's Note: Drs. Marks and Schiff were featured speakers for a panel on Threat Awareness at the 90th Annual Meeting of the Western Section AUA. For those who missed this very important information and an opportunity to be more proactive in this growing concern, Insights offers the opportunity to obtain the article written for physicians to help increase awareness and security in the workplace (and at home).

"Administration must accept the value in addressing violence in medical America. Staff at all levels (including most junior and nonmedical support staff) need to be empowered and supported by management. Development and training for procedures to support policies must be advanced by management. Management and administrators, and even the doctors, must understand and accept that security assessment and creating effective protocols are not in their “wheelhouse” and so defer to contracted professionals with experience and training. Then, with that information, management becomes involved in using this information and advice to develop and create their own practice or facility-specific policies, procedures and protocols. Evaluation and modification of these procedures are an ongoing effort. Risks and vulnerabilities constantly change; so must their remedies. Preparation, assessment and modification are essential for a successful program."

We all spend tremendous time and resources training for those rare but serious “just in case” issues. We all have routine fire drills. We all know where to find the fire extinguishers. The medical staff has to go through lengthy recertification every 2 years for ACLS, though most of us will spend our entire careers without having to run a code. To obtain the entire article please visit: www.cuanet.org.

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US Doctor Shortage Could Hit 90,000 by 2025
Forbes
The nation's shortage of doctors will rise to between 46,000 and 90,000 by 2025 as the U.S. population grows, more Americans gain health insurance and new alternative primary care sites proliferate. A new study announced by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), a lobby for medical schools and teaching hospitals, said "the doctor shortage is real" with total physician demand projected to grow by up to 17 percent as a population of baby boomers ages and the Affordable Care Act is implemented.
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State of Independence: How Practices Survive in a Challenging Healthcare Climate
FiercePracticeManagement
It's no secret that doctors relish the ability to remain autonomous in their practices, choosing which patients to treat, when and how to treat them and fundamentally, acting as their own bosses. A host of pressures — financial and otherwise — may make it difficult for providers to maintain their independence, but data from the American Medical Association indicate that while there has been a substantial increase in large-system affiliation among doctors, the majority still work for organizations owned by physicians.
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NEWS IN CALIFORNIA


Drug Transparency Bill May Be 1st in Nation
California Healthline
A bill in the California Legislature that would require pharmaceutical manufacturers to explain the prices for their expensive products is thought to be the first legislative attempt of its kind in the country. The bill — AB 463, by Assembly member David Chiu, D-San Francisco, — would require drugmakers to report profits and production expenses for any drug or course of treatment costing $10,000 or more.
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California State Lawmaker Tries Again to Expand Nurse Practitioners' Authority
KPCC
California State Senator Ed Hernandez, D-West Covina, has re-introduced a bill that would expand the authority of nurse practitioners to provide primary care without supervision by a physician. In a statement, Hernandez said the bill, SB 323, would help California meet the growing demand it faces for primary care as a result of the Affordable Care Act, which has newly insured 2.5 million Californians.
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WSAUA Insights
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Lonny Alfred, Content Editor, 469.420.2663  
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