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LEADING THE NEWS

Poll: 58 Percent of Healthcare Organizations Disappointed in ICD-10 Delay
iHealthBeat
Earlier this month, President Obama signed HR 4302 into law, a bill that pushes back the ICD-10 compliance date until at least October 2015. The poll surveyed 1,250 healthcare professionals during a DCHS webcast about the decision to delay the compliance date. The results showed that the majority of healthcare organizations are disappointed in the one-year delay of ICD-10.
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UROLOGY INDUSTRY NEWS
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword Urology.


Urologists Offer New Tool for Visualizing, Monitoring Prostate in Men with Greater Accuracy
News-medical.net
Urologists at Rush University Medical Center are the first in Chicago to offer a powerful new tool for visualizing and monitoring the prostate in men who have high prostate-specific antigen levels and in detecting prostate cancer more accurately. The new technology combines or "fuses" magnetic resonance and ultrasound images uses electromagnetic tracking/guidance, similar to your car's GPS system.
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Bladder Cancer Survival Better with Chemo
dailyRx
Patients with deadly bladder cancer usually have surgery. There is additional treatment to improve their survival odds, but it may not be used as often as it should be, new research has shown. A new study has found that although chemotherapy given before surgery for high-risk bladder cancer improved the odds of survival five years after diagnosis, few patients received this treatment.
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Antibiotic Resistance in Pediatric Urology
Medscape
Antibiotics are a mainstay in the treatment of bacterial infections, though their use is a primary risk factor for the development of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem in pediatric urology as demonstrated by increased uropathogen resistance. Lack of urine testing, nonselective use of prophylaxis, and poor empiric prescribing practices exacerbate this problem.
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Study Links Erectile Dysfunction Drugs with Increased Risk of Malignant Melanoma
WCBS-TV
A new study shows a possible link between popular erectile dysfunction drugs and an increased risk of developing a deadly form of skin cancer. Cases of the cancer are increasing at the greatest rate in men over 50 years old. The very group most likely to be using erectile dysfunction drugs such as Viagra.
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HEALTHCARE NEWS


Doctors Today: Overworked, Unhappy with Job and More Prone to Suicide
Newsmax
Nine out of 10 doctors would discourage others from choosing their profession, while data suggest that 300 physicians will commit suicide this year. The Daily Beast notes the facts are startling: Being a doctor is the second-most common profession in which people take their own lives. According to Business Insider, "Physicians are 1.87 times more likely to commit suicide" than white males working in other professions.
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Experts Warn 'Heartbleed' Bug Could Affect Healthcare Industry
iHealthBeat
Hospitals' and providers' online networks — including email accounts, electronic health records and remote monitoring devices — could be vulnerable to an encryption bug called "Heartbleed," according to security experts. A Google engineer and another security team recently discovered the bug and found that it infiltrates systems through a Web encryption program known as OpenSSL, which is used by hundreds of thousands of websites including Amazon and Google.
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Sliver of Medicare Doctors Get Big Share of Payouts
The New York Times
A tiny fraction of the 880,000 doctors and other health care providers who take Medicare accounted for nearly a quarter of the roughly $77 billion paid out to them under the federal program, receiving millions of dollars each in some cases in a single year, according to the most detailed data ever released in Medicare’s nearly 50-year history.
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New Health Secretary to Confront Healthcare-Reform Hurdles
HealthDay News
With the recent resignation of U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, the Affordable Care Act — the Obama administration's chief domestic policy initiative — will get a fresh face. But turning around public perception of the controversial healthcare-reform law in a politically charged mid-term election year poses an enormous challenge for the department's next leader, policy experts said.
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New Law's Demands on Doctors Have Many Seeking a Network
The New York Times
In an affluent suburb of Crestwood, Ky., Dr. Tracy Ragland, 46, an independent primary care physician, is anxious about the future of her small practice. The law is bringing new regulations and payment rates that she says squeeze self-employed doctors. She cherishes the autonomy of private practice and speaks darkly of the rush of independent physicians into hospital networks, which she sees as growing monopolies.
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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT


Why Some Doctors are Bypassing Insurance and Going Cash-Only
Los Angeles Daily News
In 2004, Dr. Marcy Zwelling turned her practice into concierge medicine, sometimes known as direct care. For a $2,000 annual fee, patients can call Zwelling on her cellphone, drop by her Los Alamitos, Calif. office anytime, or, for an additional cost, request a house visit. There are no insurance cards. Patients don't wait long to see her, and Zwelling’s staff avoids drowning in hours of paperwork hoping for government reimbursements. "I had to do this to be able to do my job," said Zwelling. "I get to practice the way I think I can practice best. It’s capitalism at its best."
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Doctors' Bedside Manner Affects Patients' Health
Counsel & Heal
How doctors treat their patients can greatly affect the kind of care patients receive. Some studies have found that patients do not respond well to doctors who are not compassionate. In a new study that reviewed previous clinical trials, researchers found that a doctor's bedside manner can greatly affect patients' health.
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WSAUA Insights
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Lonny Alfred, Content Editor, 469.420.2663  
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