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UROLOGY INDUSTRY NEWS
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Less Urinary Incontinence After Total Abdominal Hysterectomy
HealthDay News via Doctors Lounge
At five years after surgery, women undergoing subtotal abdominal hysterectomy were more likely to have urinary incontinence than those undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy, according to a study published in the May issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Lea Laird Andersen, M.D., from Nykøbing Falster Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues compared the rates of UI and other complications at five years after SAH or TAH.
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Renal Tumor Biopsy Urged for Small Renal Masses
Renal & Urology
Renal tumor biopsy for the characterization of small renal masses is safe and reliable and avoids unnecessary treatment, according to a new study. A team led by Antonio Finelli, M.D., of the University of Toronto, retrospectively studied 509 patients who underwent 529 biopsies for solid SRMs 4 cm or less in diameter. RTBs yielded an overall diagnostic rate of 94 percent. Following RTB, treatment could have been avoided in at least 26 percent of cases because the lesion was benign, the researchers reported online ahead of print in European Urology.
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Men with Prostate Cancer Benefit From BRCA-Targeting Drug
News Medical
Men with prostate cancer benefit from treatment with the pioneering drug olaparib – the first cancer drug to target inherited mutations – according to the results of a major trial presented on April 22. Olaparib was licensed in December for women with ovarian cancer and inherited BRCA mutations, but the new research suggests it could also benefit men with genomic faults within their tumors. Researchers told the American Association of Cancer Research conference in Philadelphia that up to 30 percent of men with advanced prostate cancer had tumors with defects in repairing DNA - and these responded particularly well to olaparib.
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PersonalizeDx
We serve the molecular testing needs of Urologists and Pathologists, and other reference laboratories, with a specialized emphasis in proprietary testing for Prostate and Bladder Cancer patients. Our area of particular focus is the early detection of genomic changes, through Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) technology, that may detect cancer, measure the potential aggressiveness of the disease, as well as identify patients most likely to respond to targeted therapies. We offer flexible testing solutions that are tailored to each client's needs.
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Honokiol Extract Holds Promise as Adjunct Treatment for Bladder and Kidney Cancers
News Medical
The botanical extract honokiol, a biologically active molecule isolated from the bark of Magnolia spp., holds promise as an adjunct treatment for aggressive bladder and kidney cancers, as reported in two new studies. New research on honokiol in bladder cancer was presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015. Research on honokiol's effect on renal cancer metastasis was published in the April 2015 issue of the International Journal of Oncology.
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HEALTHCARE NEWS


Physician Compensation, Dissatisfaction Ratchet Up
HealthLeaders Media
An annual survey of nearly 20,000 physicians finds a modest increase in average compensation, but a dip in job satisfaction across 26 medical specialties. Physician compensation has seen modest gains since 2014 — but satisfaction has not risen along with pay, the Medscape's Annual Physician Compensation Report shows. The report analyzes how compensation influences physician career considerations and job satisfaction.
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Once Cash Cows, University Hospitals Now Source of Worry for Schools
The Wall Street Journal
Teaching hospitals have long been points of pride for major universities, and in recent years revenue from medical services has served as a lifeline for some schools that have struggled with falling state aid and pressure to slow tuition increases. Now the marriages between universities and their cash-cow clinical operations are starting to fray as changes stemming from the 2010 healthcare law threaten to make university hospitals less profitable.
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Technological Change Creates a 'Blind Spot' in Physician Credentialing
HealthLeaders Media
When a patient suffered a cascade of complications after robotic surgery, his lawyers thought the doctor, the hospital, and the device maker should be liable. But in a malpractice case involving the da Vinci Surgical System, the courts disagreed. The 2013 decision that Intuitive Surgical, the maker of da Vinci, was not responsible for the action of a poorly trained doctor may be good news for the medical device makers. The ruling is under appeal, but the case raises a question for hospitals, according to a recent commentary published in the Journal of the American Medical Association: Do hospitals need to strengthen traditional credentialing programs to ensure that doctors are adequately trained in the use of new devices?
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ABMS Chief Defends MOC
HealthLeaders Media
Lois Nora, M.D., president and CEO of the American Board of Medical Specialties, explains why she believes her organization's program, which is used by physicians to maintain professional certification, is superior to states' continuing medical education requirements. "Numerous doctors have gone public about the unfairness they feel they must endure with the ABMS's new 'continuous learning' requirements. These 'maintenance of certification,' (MOC) requirements mean testing every two years instead of taking an exam every 10 years. Just satisfying state continuing medical education (CME) requirements during the interim is no longer sufficient," Nora said.
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3 Ways Big Data Will Personalize Medicine
Forbes
The definition of "healthcare" in recent years has expanded beyond referencing providers and hospitals to include pharma, insurance, biology life science organizations, medical device manufacturers, and public agencies. For IT providers, this vast, heterogeneous landscape brings with it inherent complexities. It also presents opportunities for IT to make meaningful contributions by improving patient care, enabling healthcare providers to share and use data collaboratively, and treating diseases more proactively.
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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT


6 in 10 Physicians Would Quit Today
HealthLeaders Media
Doctors are working less, seeing fewer patients, and many would quit if they could, a sweeping survey of 13,575 physicians from across the nation shows. The survey, A Survey of America's Physicians: Practice Patterns and Perspectives, was commissioned by The Physicians Foundation. It is the latest, and perhaps the largest and most comprehensive of a number of surveys that have identified wide, deep and increasing discontent among the nation's physicians regardless of their age, gender, specialty, location, or employment status.
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3 Social Media Shortcuts for Physicians
FiercePracticeManagement
One of physicians' most common objections to participating in social media is the amount of time it may require, on top of their already overburdened schedules. But having an online presence doesn't have to be all-consuming to have a positive impact on your practice. Consider the following time-saving tips provided by social media expert Kevin Pho, M.D., in the Spring 2015 edition of Physician Family Magazine.
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NEWS IN CALIFORNIA


Nurses Union Plans Short Strikes in California and Illinois
Reuters
A union representing nurses in California and Illinois said on Monday, April 27 that 6,400 members planned to walk off their jobs later this week for a series of one- and two-day strikes amid contract negotiations. The planned strikes in Chicago, Los Angeles, Sacramento and other cities come amid tense labor negotiations between the California Nurses Association and its corollary, National Nurses United. Issues in contention vary from location to location, but include salary, health benefits and nurse-to-patient staffing ratios, said Chuck Idelson, spokesman for the California Nurses Association.
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WSAUA Insights
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Lonny Alfred, Content Editor, 469.420.2663  
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