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With 2014 coming to a close, WSAUA would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a very safe and happy holiday season.

As we reflect on the past year, we would like to provide WSAUA Insights subscribers with a look at the most-read news stories.

Your regular news publication will resume on Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015.



ANNUAL MEETING UPDATE

THE GIVING POWER OF UROLOGY: Western Section Urologists Can Improve the Environment while Redistributing Medical Supplies to Areas of Need
MedShare
According to the 2006 Alameda County Recycling Plan, hospitals are the 4th largest producers of solid waste. At the same time, safety net clinics and remote clinics here and abroad are struggling to offer services for lack of medical supplies. Due to legal restrictions and other reasons, U.S. hospitals discard 5,000 tons of useful medical supplies every day.

Since 1998, MedShare has been the bridge between surplus and need to improve healthcare and the environment through the efficient recovery and redistribution of surplus medical supplies and equipment from hospitals, manufacturers and distributors. MedShare, a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization, offers healthcare organizations a unique opportunity to divert this surplus from landfills and make it available to local community health clinics and hospitals in the developing world.

MedShare's Container Program delivers containers with medical supplies and equipment to the developing world. Last year, MedShare shipped 128 containers to recipients in 28 different countries and equipped 107 safety net clinics. In the Western region alone, MedShare equipped 295 medical mission teams and diverted 292 tons of medical surplus from Bay Area landfills. Watch how it’s done (put link in your browser): http://youtu.be/XEQBn53LYKk

Two Western Section urologists, Linda Shortliffe and Eric Engelman are members of MedShare’s Western Regional Council. We hope that Western Section urologists will join us in making a difference in our West and the world, and consider supporting Medshare to fund shipping a container of our medical surplus supplies to places of medical need.

The Power of One the Impact of Many. Follow us on Twitter #givingTuesday @MedShare, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

MedShare is recipient of Charity Navigator's top 4 star rating for 8 consecutive years, 2012 Acterra Environmental Innovation Award, Google’s 2014 Bay Area Impact Challenge Award, and the 2014 Volunteer Choice Award.
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HEALTHCARE NEWS


Manage Chronic Kidney Disease with New Guide
National Kidney Disease Education Program
From Nov. 26: The National Kidney Disease Education Program recently released a new guide (PDF) to help primary care providers manage chronic kidney disease. NKDEP developed the new guide to help healthcare professionals manage adult CKD patients in the primary care setting. The guide emphasizes the most important considerations for evaluating and managing CKD patients, including identifying and slowing progression among patients at highest risk for progression to kidney failure.'
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New Blood Test for Prostate Cancer Improves Diagnostic Accuracy
Fox News
From Aug. 7: A new blood test for prostate cancer is improving the accuracy of diagnoses and may even reduce the frequency of false positives and unnecessary biopsies. The Prostate Health Index test could fill the diagnostic gap clinicians currently have when screening for prostate cancer. By using three different prostate-specific markers, the test is more accurate in detecting prostate cancer than the current prostate specific antigen test.
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The Truth Behind Obamacare 6 Million Figure
CNN
From Jan. 23: Health Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said in a blog post Monday that "More than 6 million Americans have now either signed up for a private health insurance plan through the Marketplace or for Medicaid coverage." But the numbers are somewhat misleading.
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UW Testing Kidney Stone Treatment That Doesn't Need a Hospital Visit
MyNorthwest.com
From Jan. 16: Chris Sullivan writes, "Kidney stones. Alright I said it. Now that your initial wincing is over and your painful thoughts have left you, imagine if there was a way to deal with them that would prevent the traditional ultrasound blasting that usually ends up with a hospital stay."
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Stark Decision Leaves CMS Open to More Medicare Challenges
HealthLeaders Media
From Feb. 13: If your practice has a financial arrangement with or owns a lithotripsy center, you no longer have to worry about violating the Stark law when you refer patients to the center. The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled on July 12, 2013 that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) overstepped its bounds when it included lithotripsy services among the designated health services covered under Stark.
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7 Signs Providers Are Opening Up About Bad Healthcare Outcomes
HealthLeaders Media
From Jan. 9: After a procedure doctors said was extremely safe, something went terribly wrong. An otherwise alert and healthy patient isn't better and in fact, she's a lot worse. She's in a coma, or she may die, or at best, spend months in intensive care. No one at the hospital explains to the patient's family what happened. Or why. Or how. It's a shock. The family thinks someone has screwed up.
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Team Identifies Source of Most Cases of Invasive Bladder Cancer
Stanford University Medical Center via Medical Xpress
From April 24: A single type of cell in the lining of the bladder is responsible for most cases of invasive bladder cancer, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Their study, conducted in mice, is the first to pinpoint the normal cell type that can give rise to invasive bladder cancers. It's also the first to show that most bladder cancers and their associated precancerous lesions arise from just one cell, and explains why many human bladder cancers recur after therapy.
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8 in 10 Doctors 'Overextended' or at 'Full Capacity'
HealthLeaders Media
From Nov. 13: Physicians Foundation data shows that 44 percent of physicians surveyed said they would reduce the number of patients they see to alleviate the demands of the profession. As the nation adjusts to Medicaid expansion, a graying demographic, and extended health insurance coverage for millions of Americans through the public exchanges, 81 percent of physicians say they're either overextended or at full capacity, The Physicians Foundation survey shows.
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Vet's Death Highlights Urology Wait-Time Issues
azcentral
From May 29: All Gilford Anderson wanted was to find out exactly why his lower extremities, including his genitals, were swelling — and to ask a Phoenix Veterans Affairs doctor whether the swelling was linked to a procedure he'd received last December. Anderson, who had prostate cancer, had been feeling sick since a stent had been implanted. Over the next five months, his body quickly deteriorated and cancer spread through his bones.
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When Doctors 'Google' Their Patients
The New York Times
From Jan. 9: Dr. Haider Javed Warraich writes, "I remember when I first looked up a patient on Google. It was my last day on the bone marrow transplant unit, back when I was an intern. As I stood before the patient, taking her history, she told me she had been a painter and suggested I look up her work on the Internet. I did, and I found her paintings fascinating. Even though our paths crossed fleetingly, she is one of the few patients I vividly remember from that time."
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WSAUA Insights
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Lonny Alfred, Content Editor, 469.420.2663  
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