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Steering clear of infectious microorganisms in the dental office
Inside Dental Assisting
Oral fluids such as blood and saliva, which are encountered regularly during dental procedures, can harbor infectious microorganisms. Between patients, dental team members, and other visitors to the office, the dental office presents numerous opportunities for transmission of these organisms. Potentially infectious microorganisms may be present in the oral fluids of patients, in the body fluids, or on the hands of dental healthcare personnel, and on environmental surfaces.
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Take your gloves seriously
RDH
Wearing gloves during clinical procedures is a price we pay for ensuring clinician and patient safety. While cross-contamination is a serious issue, something as seemingly innocuous as gloves has a great potential to create unnecessary stress leading to musculoskeletal damage and injuries.
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Can dentures lead to oral infections?
WorlDental.org's Dental Health Magazine
According to the American College of Prosthodontists, over 35 million Americans have no teeth in one or both jaws. Another 178 million are missing one or more teeth. In the past, dentures were the primary method of treating this condition. But did you know that these common dental appliances carry an increased risk of oral infection?
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Targeting the 'dental divide'
American Dental Association
The Association, citing "a disturbing dental divide in America," announced a nationwide campaign May 15 to reduce the numbers of adults and children with untreated dental disease. The ADA unveiled the multifaceted campaign, Action for Dental Health: Dentists Making a Difference, at a National Press Club event with national media representatives, members of Congress and oral health advocates and professionals.
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Fluoridated water? Not all Portlanders in Oregon will drink to that
Los Angeles Times
Proponents of fluoridating Portland, Ore.'s water supply had no trouble getting the local Urban League on board. Here in the biggest city in the country that still doesn't treat its water to prevent tooth decay, studies show that low-income children and kids of color have been hit hardest by untreated cavities.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword fluoride.


7 practical tips for effective supervision
By D. Albert Brannen
Dental practice managers have increasing difficulty navigating today's alphabet soup of federal employment laws — ADA, ADEA, FMLA, IRCA, OSHA, NLRB, etc. State and local laws further complicate the making of employment decisions. At the risk of oversimplifying things, we prepared this list of seven tips for effective supervision to avoid legal liability in the workplace.
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Industry Pulse: Do you always keep documentation of important facts?
ANSWER NOW


Are CBCT scans necessary prior to orthodontic treatment?
Dr. Bicuspid
Taking cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans prior to orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning is warranted for patients with unerupted teeth or severe root resorption, according to a new study in the American Journal of Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopedics. Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles wanted to measure the impact of CBCT on orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, and determine what patient characteristics might play a role in deciding whether to use CBCT for this application.
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The cost of delaying dental care: What dental professionals can do to help turn a bad trend around
Dentistry IQ
A recent survey of more than 1,000 adults conducted by ORC International and commissioned by Aspen Dental reports that more than one in three American adults (36 percent) has delayed or will delay dental care due to the uncertain U.S. economy and their lingering fears about their current financial situation.

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For oral cancer, early detection is key
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
As with most cancers, earlier detection yields better outcomes. But with oral cancer, which in the latter stages often metastasizes in the surrounding lymph nodes, the difference between catching it sooner rather than later is especially stark.

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The art of mastering accurate impressions
Inside Dental Assisting
An increasing amount of restorative materials are available, yet the goal of creating accurate master impressions continues to be challenging. The final impression must capture all details of the tooth. Devoting the time to creating a healthy oral environment prior to the restorative phase will be key.

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Alligators may help some human dental issues
Dentistry Today
Scientists are now looking at one of the unique qualities of alligator teeth: the capability the animals have of regrowing their teeth. At any time, they can have 80 teeth while producing 50 sets of replacement teeth. In their lifetime, they may go through more than 2,000 teeth. This ability to regrow teeth has given scientists the idea to study the way this process happens to aid people who encounter numerous dental issues.
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Toothbrush with caffeine? Patent filed for device that delivers chemicals while you brush
The Huffington Post
Can't start your day without a cup of coffee? Your morning routine may soon get a whole lot easier. Colgate-Palmolive filed a patent application for a toothbrush capable of delivering a dose of chemicals to the user with every brush. While a number of medicines could conceivably be distributed, the idea appears to have taken off in a singular direction: a toothbrush with caffeine.
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ADAAF ANNOUNCES CONTEST FOR STATES
The contest, which started in January and goes through Sept. 15 — the state that contributes the most money to the Foundation during that time will win their entire delegate registrations paid by the ADAAF! Click here for more details!



11 of the worst foods for your teeth
The Huffington Post
We all know certain foods (especially sugary ones) lead to cavities, but they can also cause pain to people with sensitive teeth. According to a recent study by Sensodyne, one in three Canadians regularly experience tooth pain due to sensitivity and 44 per cent of them aren't always aware of possible long-term effects such as gum disease and tooth decay.
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Could exams cause tooth decay?
Health Canal
A recent scientific study has suggested academic stress, often as its highest during exams, could cause tooth decay, with younger students at greater risk than older students. The study looked at the oral health of 73 students before, during and after their exams. Results showed that students under stress had higher levels of tooth decay than students with a low stress level. It also found 18 year old students were almost twice more likely to develop tooth decay than 22 year old students.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Piercings and tattoos on dental office employees (DentistryIQ)
Confronting and overcoming some of the challenges faced by female dental team members on a daily basis (DentstryIQ)
The art of mastering accurate impressions (Inside Dental Assisting)
Dentists recount Boston bombing experiences (American Dental Association)
Accountability in the dental office: The secret to an efficient, effective team (MultiBriefs)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 


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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Yvette Craig, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2641  
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