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Home    About    Membership    Foundation    Journal    Scholarship    ADAA CE Oct. 26, 2010
 
ADAA
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Oct. 26, 2010
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Farewell address from ADAA's 85th President Angela M. Swatts, CDA, EFDA
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WOW! Has it been an entire year since I first addressed you as president of the American Dental Assistants Association? It has indeed been a year, and what a wonderful year it has been. ADAA ventured into cyberspace this year with Twitter and Facebook and has reached out to dental professionals everywhere via this awesome 24/7 electronic newsletter. It has been quite the journey this past year, a journey of hard work, and success. We launched a new membership category in 2010; E-Membership. We now have over 7,000 E- Members and are on target to have over 10,000 by year's end. Soon, ADAA will be known internationally with E-Members from several different countries. More

Medical Dental Film Digitizer

Take your office completely digital!
Get high-speed digitizing of dental images without sacrificing quality. Designed for Panoramic, Cephalometric, and intraoral film, the VIDAR Dental Film Digitizer is specifically tailored for the dental office and is a regulated medical device for use in diagnostic applications. MORE


Taking a closer look at plaque
ScienceDaily    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A team of University of Rochester scientists is using the technique of Raman spectroscopy to study two common dental plaque bacteria, Streptococcus sanguis and mutans. The relative balance of the two may be an indicator of a patient's oral health and risk for tooth decay — Streptococcus sanguis is associated with "healthy" plaque, while mutans is associated with tooth decay. More

Genetics responsible for tooth decay risks?
Dentistry IQ    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail
article
If there were a way to predict who would suffer from tooth decay, and who would not, before any symptoms showed, then preventing the condition would be a much easier task. New research suggests this may one day be the case. More

Dentistry's green future
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Ina Pockrass, co-founder of the Eco-Dentistry Association, discusses ways you can be part of dentistry's clean, green and highly profitable future. More

The ugly truth about your toothbrush
WebMD    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Do you know what's lurking on your toothbrush? Your toothbrush is loaded with germs, say researchers at England's University of Manchester. They've found that one uncovered toothbrush can harbor more than 100 million bacteria, including E. coli bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, and staphylococci ("Staph") bacteria that cause skin infections. But don't panic. Your mouth wasn't exactly sterile to begin with. More

Teeth grinders, jaw clenchers at risk for TMJ
The Patriot-News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Teeth grinders, jaw clenchers and overzealous yawners can develop TMJ. If you prop up your head by resting your jaw in one or both palms, or if you frequently cradle a telephone between your head and shoulder, you increase the odds of getting the disorder. Gum chewing, teeth licking, fingernail biting, stress, poor posture and trauma are other common causes. Degenerative joint disease, arthritis and severe trauma can lead to extreme cases of TMJ, and might require more aggressive treatment, including surgery. More

In patients with gum disease, osteoporosis drug builds bone
Medical News Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A drug marketed to grow bone in osteoporosis patients also works to heal bone wounds in gum disease patients, a University of Michigan study suggests. The findings are significant because gum disease is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults and is associated with a host of other health problems. Periodontal disease results in loss of teeth and can be devastating because it compromises speaking as well as eating, which can in turn contribute to poor nutrition. More
 


DentalEZ® Stools: comfort and efficiency!


Position yourself properly for any procedure while minimizing stresses or strains related to dental practice.

 

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