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ADAA NEWS

Don't miss the Anxiety and Depression conference in Miami
ADAA
Have you registered for the Anxiety and Depression Conference in Miami, April 9-12? Don’t miss out on the early registration discount and over 150 sessions providing up to 28 CE or CME credits.

New! The ADAA Conference is now approved for the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) Maintenance of Certification Program and 3 Self-Assessment Activities.
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Join ADAA today
ADAA
Join Now! Become a member of ADAA and network with experts in anxiety disorders and depression, market your practice and receive discounts on continuing education.
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ADAA RESOURCES


Special DVD offer with CE credits
ADAA

Accelerated Treatment for Anxiety: Core Concepts with Reid Wilson, Ph.D. ($59.00)

Reid Wilson, Ph.D., sums up the fundamentals of tackling the most common condition confronting psychotherapists. In this lively new video, combining a live presentation with an accompanying case demonstration, he illustrates the core concepts of his groundbreaking technique and paradoxical twist in exposure therapy.

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Depression & Anxiety — the official journal of ADAA
ADAA
Cognitive behavioral therapy for hoarding disorder: a meta-analysis.

Hoarding disorder (HD) is a new diagnosis in DSM-5 (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) appears promising for the treatment of HD, and has been tested in both individual and group settings.

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RESOURCES


New webinar series — Suicide Prevention: An Action Plan to Save Lives
ADAA
In February 2014, the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s Research Prioritization Task Force (RPTF) released A Prioritized Research Agenda for Suicide Prevention: An Action Plan to Save Lives, which outlines the research areas that show the most promise in helping to reduce the rates of suicide attempts and deaths in the next 5-10 years.

The Prioritized Research Agenda is organized around six key questions, each of which will be addressed in a series of webinars sponsored by the National Council for Behavioral Health in collaboration with the Action Alliance and the National Institute of Mental Health.
  • Jan. 29 — Why do people become suicidal?
  • Feb. 24 — How can we better detect/predict suicide risk?
  • April 2 — What interventions prevent suicidal behavior?
  • April 29 — What are the most effective services to treat and prevent suicidal behavior?
  • May 27 — What suicide interventions outside of health care settings reduce risk?
  • June 24 — What research infrastructure do we need to reduce suicidal behavior?

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TAKING ACTION


Insurance reimbursements for patient care
ADAA
ADAA member, Dr. Phillip Muskin, offers a provider’s perspective on the limited access to mental healthcare. Read his blog post and then tell Care for Your Mind, Psychiatrists versus family physicians: what do you think is the difference in how insurance reimburses them for patient care?
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RESEARCH AND PRACTICE NEWS


Treating depression in older adults
SAMHSA
Forty percent of adult men with MDE never received treatment. How many of your patients don't receive treatment? Download the Free Treatment of Depression in Older Adults Evidence-Based Practices Kit.
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Genetic determinants of depression: Recent findings and future directions
Harvard Review of Psychiatry
Depression is one of the most prevalent, disabling and costly mental health conditions in the U.S. and also worldwide. One promising avenue for preventing depression and informing its clinical treatment lies in uncovering the genetic and environmental determinants of the disorder as well as their interaction.
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Shift in fear retrieval circuitry eyed in anxiety disorders — NIH-funded studies
NIH
NIH-funded researchers have discovered that an old fear memory is recalled by a separate brain pathway from the one originally used to recall it when it was fresh. Uncovering new pathways for old memories could change scientists’ view of post-traumatic stress disorder, in which fearful events occur months or years prior to the onset of symptoms.
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Retaining Part D's comprehensive coverage of antidepressants — not a silver bullet
JAMA
This opinion piece reviews evidence on the range of antidepressant choices needed for depression treatment, examine current antidepressant use patterns in Part D and assess how the proposed change would affect the quality of antidepressant treatment in Medicare.
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Studies support primary care treatment for depression
Medscape (free subscription)
Two analyses published in the Annals of Family Medicine found patients with depression can be treated effectively in a primary care setting. The reports found face-to-face and remote patient visits were successful, along with using medications such as tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.
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These common mood changes can signal early Alzheimer's
TIME
The vast majority of people with Alzheimer's disease will experience changes like depression and anxiety. But a new study published in the journal Neurology shows that behavioral changes like these start well before they begin to have memory loss. The researchers looked at 2,416 people over age 50 without cognitive issues. After following them for seven years, researchers found that 1,218 people developed dementia.
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Depression, neuroimaging and connectomics: A selective overview
Biological Psychiatry
Depression is a multifactorial disorder with clinically heterogeneous features involving disturbances of mood and cognitive function. Noninvasive neuroimaging studies have provided rich evidence that these behavioral deficits in depression are associated with structural and functional abnormalities in specific regions and connections.
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Anxiety drugs may be overprescribed for older women
HealthCentral
A lot of older Americans, particularly women, are still being prescribed sedatives and anti-anxiety medications for long periods, even though these drugs are meant for short-term treatment of anxiety and sleep problems. A recent study, published in JAMA Psychiatry, found that in 2008, 12 percent of American women over 80 were taking benzodiazepines, usually the brands of valium and xanax.
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Study says anxiety and depression twice as prevalent in military
BBC News
Members of the U.K. armed forces are twice as likely to develop depression or anxiety than members of the general working population, a study suggests. The King's College London research compared surveys from 7,000 military personnel with people in other jobs. It found 18 percent of men and 25 percent of women in the forces reported symptoms of common mental disorders, compared with 8 percent of men and 12 percent of women in other areas.
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Postpartum depression can start as soon as you're pregnant
The Huffington Post
Having a new baby is supposed to be a joyful experience — but for many women, it comes with some significant mental health challenges. While up to 70 percent of women report some experience of "baby blues" after giving birth, full-blown postpartum depression affects roughly 16 percent of new mothers.
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Severe depression linked with inflammation in the brain
Medical News Today
Inflammation is the immune system's natural response to infection or disease. The body often uses inflammation to protect itself, such as when an ankle is sprained and becomes inflamed, and the same principle also applies to the brain. However, too much inflammation is unhelpful and can be damaging. Increasingly, evidence is suggesting that inflammation may drive some depressive symptoms, such as low mood, loss of appetite and reduced ability to sleep.
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Mouse study provides insights on anxiety
PsychCentral
Researchers have discovered a new pathway that controls fear memories and behavior in a mouse brain. They believe the finding may eventually help explain the way in which human anxiety disorders develop. For the nearly 40 million adults who suffer from anxiety disorders, an overabundance of fear rules their lives.
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Regular walking can help ease depression
Reuters via Scientific American
Moderate-intensity exercise, or even just walking, can improve quality of life for depressed middle-aged women, a large Australian study suggests. Women who averaged 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 200 minutes of walking every week had more energy, socialized more, felt better emotionally and weren't as limited by their depression when researchers followed up after three years.
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Distraction during surgery 'reduces anxiety and pain'
BBC News
Using a stress ball or watching a DVD during surgery can reduce a patient's anxiety levels, suggests a study from the University of Surrey. Patients said their pain levels were also reduced by chatting to nurses while under local anesthetic.
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New study suggests postpartum depression lasts longer than you think
The Huffington Post
A study published in the BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, suggests that mothers have a higher chance of experiencing depressive symptoms four years after giving birth than in the first 12 months after their child is born. The study used data from questionnaires completed by 1,507 women attending public hospitals in Melbourne, Australia.
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Depression, loneliness linked to binge-watching TV
CBS News
A study published recently presented at the 65th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association in San Juan, Puerto Rico, found people who binge-watch television tend to be among the most depressed and lonely. "Given that binge-watching involves obsessed, intense and dedicated behavior, characteristics indicative of addictive behaviors, it is expected that negative emotions such as loneliness and depression will be positively associated with binge watching," the researchers write in their study.
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Anxiety moderates amyloid-beta association with cognition
HealthDay News via Medical Xpress
For older adults, elevated amyloid-β (Aβ) levels correlate with cognitive decline, and elevated anxiety moderates these associations, according to a study published online Jan. 28, in JAMA Psychiatry. Robert H. Pietrzak, Ph.D., from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in West Haven, Connecticut, and colleagues examined the correlation between Aβ status and cognitive changes in a multicenter, prospective study.
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About Anxiety & Depression Insights

This news brief is a timely update about anxiety disorders and depression sent to members of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and other professionals interested in this area. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of the reader. External resources are not a part of the ADAA website, and ADAA is not responsible for the content of external sites. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by ADAA of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site. For more information about ADAA, visit www.ADAA.org.
 



Anxiety & Depression Insights
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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