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A message from the president
ADAA
I have been attending the ADAA Annual Conference for more than 15 years, but this will be my first as ADAA president. I am proud to be at the head of an organization that is leading the way in anxiety disorders and depression. ADAA truly integrates research and practice across disciplines. Join me, March 27-30, in Chicago for the best gathering for those focusing on anxiety disorders and depression. There are master clinicians, cutting edge research and workshops. If you are a physician, psychologist, social worker, counselor, therapist or nurse you can earn up to 29 CE or CME credits. Most of all the conference connects you with others who share your interests and passions. This meeting has it all, and more – it is friendly, engaging and meaningful. Hope to see you in Chicago. Learn more and register.

Mark Pollack, M.D. – ADAA President
Rush University Medical Center
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Workshop on mental health in children and teens
ADAA and AKFSA
March 26, at 1 p.m.
Chicago Marriott
3 CE hours

More than one in eight children will be diagnosed with an anxiety or mood disorder. The most common mental illnesses, these are highly treatable with early diagnosis and intervention. Join colleagues and experts to discuss anxiety disorders and depression in children, adolescents, and teens. The members of an expert panel will address what’s normal and what’s an anxiety disorder; identify early warning signs and focus on social anxiety disorder, a serious often-overlooked disorder.

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TAKING ACTION


Partnership for Part D Access
ADAA
ADAA has joined Partnership for Part D Access to protect continued access to critical medicines for vulnerable patients. Act before March 7, to stop proposed changes by the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to eliminate the six protected classes under Medicare Part D prescription. Because mental health is one of the protected classes, the proposed changes would restrict access to antidepressants and antipsychotics.
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RESEARCH AND PRACTICE NEWS


Suicide risk among soldiers
JAMA Psychiatry
Modeled after the Framingham Heart Study, the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is designed to identify salient risk and protective factors regarding suicide, adverse mental health outcomes and functional impairment. This groundbreaking initiative is investigating a wide range of domains, from large administrative data sets to behavioral, neurobiological and genetic markers. It will certainly have a great impact on the field of psychiatry.
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Study: Suicidal tendencies are evident before deployment
The New York Times
Amid growing alarm at the rate of suicide among members of the military and confusion about possible causes, researchers reported recently that most of the Army’s enlisted men and women with suicidal tendencies had them before they enlisted, and that those at highest risk of making an attempt often had a long history of impulsive anger. The new research — contained in three papers posted online by the journal JAMA Psychiatry — found that about one in 10 soldiers qualified for a diagnosis of “intermittent explosive disorder,” as it is known to psychiatrists — more than five times the rate found in the general population.
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Treatment for youth anxiety is effective, lasting
Psych Central
A new study confirms that current treatment strategies for youth with moderate to severe anxiety disorders are effective and provide long-term benefits. As published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, researchers found that the majority of youth anxiety disorders responded well to acute treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medication (sertraline) or a combination of both.
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List depression as official heart disease risk factor, AHA panel says
Medscape (free subscription)
Depression should join the ranks of obesity, diabetes, hypertension and smoking as an official heart disease risk factor, according to an expert panel convened by the American Heart Association (AHA). The recommendation is based on an extensive literature review examining the risks for depression conducted by the panel, which included Robert M. Carney, Ph.D., professor of psychiatry at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Miss.
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Inflammation may be PTSD risk factor
MedPageToday
High levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammation marker, were seen in soldiers who later developed post-traumatic stress disorder, researchers said. Among U.S. Marines and Navy personnel who consented to participate in a prospective study, each 10-fold increment in CRP levels at pre-deployment baseline was associated with a 51 percent increased likelihood of showing at least one PTSD symptom after deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan (odds ratio 1.51, 95 percent CI 1.15-1.97, P=0.003), reported Dewleen Baker, M.D., of the VA Healthcare System in San Diego, and colleagues.
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New study combats depression in carers
Medical Xpress
Psychologists from the University of Exeter are trialling an innovative new type of support to help relatives and friends who care for stroke survivors – with studies showing that currently one in three become depressed or suffer other mental health problems. Approximately 152,000 people suffer a stroke each year in the U.K. and between 2011-2012 there were almost 4,000 emergency stroke admissions across Devon, Cornwall, Somerset and Dorset.
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Increasing brain acidity may slow down anxiety
The Health Site
Scientists have found a new target to treat anxiety disorder. Increasing acidity in the brain’s emotional control center can reduce anxiety, according to a new research. At the cellular level, anxiety disorders are associated with heightened activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the brain which is known to play a central role in emotional behavior.
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New test suggests antidepressant Paxil may promote breast cancer
Los Angeles Times
A team of researchers from the City of Hope in Duarte has developed a speedy way to identify drugs and chemicals that can disrupt the balance of sex hormones in human beings and influence the development and progress of diseases such as breast cancer. In a trial screening of 446 drugs in wide circulation, the new assay singled out the popular antidepressant paroxetine (better known by its commercial name, Paxil) as having a weak estrogenic effect that could promote the development and growth of breast tumors in women.
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Study: Too often, doctors miss suicide's warning signs
HealthDay News via U.S. News and World Report
Nearly 37,000 Americans kill themselves each year, according to federal statistics. But many of those deaths might have been prevented if doctors had been better at picking up on the warning signs of suicide, a new study suggests. "A national suicide reduction goal may be met if more primary care doctors and specialists receive and use training to identify and treat patients most at risk," study lead author Brian Ahmedani, an assistant scientist in the Center for Health Policy and Health Services Research at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, said in a statement from the health system.
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Cognitive behavioral therapy for better sleep
Medical Xpress
As the sun sets and day turns to night, we find ourselves growing weary, worn out from a busy day. We follow a ritual that leads us down the path to a restful slumber. We power down with perhaps a warm bath, brush our teeth, pull on the pajamas and sink into bed. Some may read from a favorite book or listen to some soothing music. Then it's lights out. But for the 15 million Americans across the country who suffer from chronic insomnia, getting to sleep and staying asleep becomes a chore, or worse, a trigger for anxiety.
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Stress, anxiety, and brainwave dysregulation
Chiro Eco
Stress causes anxiety and the experience of anxiety is actually a normal reaction to stress and in some situations may even be beneficial. For some, however, anxiety can interfere with the ability to function normally and even cause uncontrollable panic attacks. A large national survey on adolescent mental health reported that 8 percent of teens age 13 to 18 have an anxiety disorder, with symptoms commonly emerging around age 6.
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Doctors: Kids' checkups should include depression test
Healthday News via WebMD
Doctors should test middle school-age children for high cholesterol and start screening for depression at age 11, according to updated guidelines from a leading group of U.S. pediatricians. Doctors should also test older teens for HIV, the AIDS-causing virus, the revised preventive-care recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics say.
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About Anxiety & Depression Insights
ADAA
This news brief is a timely update about anxiety disorders and depression sent to members of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and other professionals interested in this area. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of the reader. External resources are not a part of the ADAA website, and ADAA is not responsible for the content of external sites. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by ADAA of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site. For more information about ADAA, visit www.ADAA.org.
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