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RESEARCH AND PRACTICE NEWS

ICU stay linked to increased psychiatric risk after discharge
HealthDay News
An analysis of data involving more than 24,000 critically ill patients in Denmark found they were at increased risk of mental health problems after being discharged. Researchers said 0.5 percent of the patients were diagnosed with at least one new mental health condition within three months of discharge, while 13 percent were prescribed psychiatric medications, rates much higher than for a control group. The findings appear in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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Study: Early life chronic stress may cause anxiety in adulthood
News-Medical
In recent years, behavioral neuroscientists have debated the meaning and significance of a plethora of independently conducted experiments seeking to establish the impact of chronic, early-life stress upon behavior - both at the time that stress is experienced, and upon the same individuals later in life, during adulthood. These experiments, typically conducted in rodents, have on the one hand clearly indicated a link between certain kinds of early stress and dysfunction in the neuroendocrine system, particularly in the so-called HPA axis, which regulates the endocrine glands and stress hormones including corticotropin and glucocorticoid. Yet the evidence is by no means unequivocal.
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Smartphones collect data to predict onset of depression
The Tartan
How smart have our smartphones become? So smart that they might know us better than we know ourselves, according to associate professor of the School of Computer Science and the Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII) Jason Hong and associate professor of HCII and the School of Design John Zimmerman. By taking advantage of how much information our smartphones are able to obtain, Hong and Zimmerman are studying how smartphone data can help predict the onset of depression.
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Stem cell research opens doors to potential new treatments for bipolar disorder
News-Medical
What makes a person bipolar, prone to manic highs and deep, depressed lows? Why does bipolar disorder run so strongly in families, even though no single gene is to blame? And why is it so hard to find new treatments for a condition that affects 200 million people worldwide? New stem cell research published by scientists from the University of Michigan Medical School, and fueled by the Heinz C. Prechter Bipolar Research Fund, may help scientists find answers to these questions.
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Low intensity methods aid depression
PsychCentral
Recent findings show that self-help books and Internet-based help can benefit even severely depressed people. “Depression is a major cause of disability,” said Professor Peter Bower of Manchester University, U.K., and colleagues in the British Medical Journal. “Effective management is a key challenge for healthcare systems,” they write.
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Urinary incontinence ups risk of depression in older women
HealthDay News via Doctors Lounge
Older women with urinary incontinence may be at increased risk for depression and work disability, according to research published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Kristin J. Hung, M.D., of Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues analyzed data for 4,511 women, aged 54 to 65 years at baseline in 1996, from the Health and Retirement Study cohort to assess urinary incontinence and its association with probable depression, work disability, and workforce exit. The women were interviewed every two years until 2010 to 2011.
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Lack of insight linked to disengagement with cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis
News-Medical
Lack of insight, poor social functioning and negative symptoms help to predict which patients will drop out of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for psychosis, say researchers. “This pattern of findings indicates that there might be a more socially isolated and difficult-to-reach subgroup of highly symptomatic patients with low insight, who are more skeptical of services and treatment offers”, wrote lead study author Tania Lincoln and co-workers in Psychiatry Research.
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Botulinum toxin injections improve depression
Medscape (free subscription)
Botulinum toxin A, commonly known as Botox, has an antidepressive effect when injected between the eyebrows that continues beyond the cosmetic effects of the injection, according to the results of a new study. The fact that the antidepressive effect continued after the wrinkles reappeared suggests that the elevated mood isn't just related to cosmetic improvements, which is "profound and unexpected," said study investigator Michelle Magid, M.D., clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern in Austin.
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Cognitive behavioral therapy gives long term benefits for patients
The British Psychological Society
Providing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for people with mental health disorders such as depression and eating disorders could provide them with long-term benefits without the need for drugs, an expert on the talking treatment has said. Speaking to the BBC, consultant clinical psychologist from Kings College London and member of the British Psychological Society Dr Jennifer Wild explained that CBT works by teaching participants how to look at themselves in a different way. It is based on the idea that problems are not caused by particular situations, but by the ways in which we interpret them and react to them.
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Depressed diabetics may face higher risk of kidney disease
HealthDay News via Philly.com
When people with diabetes are depressed, their odds of developing chronic kidney disease nearly double, a new study suggests. Chronic kidney disease, which can lead to kidney failure, is a progressive loss of kidney function over months or years. Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure, according to the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
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MDMA helps reduce social anxiety for autistic adults, and researchers want to find out how
The Raw Story
Researchers want to find out whether MDMA has the same benefits for autistic adults in a therapeutic setting as it apparently does in recreational use. A scientist at Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute said she has conducted interviews with numerous adults on the autism spectrum who have taken the drug – which is sometimes called Ecstasy or Molly – recreationally and reported a reduction in social anxiety.
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Psychedelics shown to relieve anxiety
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Timothy Leary had the counterculture, not medicine, in mind when he titled his 1966 album, “Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out.” Surely if slowly, though, researchers are discovering that LSD and other psychedelic drugs long banned for their harm when abused can benefit some people under controlled circumstances. In a widely publicized study released earlier in March, a Swiss research team led by Peter Gasser, M.D., of the Medical Office for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy in Solothurn, Switzerland, found that of 12 patients with life-threatening illnesses, all eight receiving the drug showed statistically significant reductions in standard anxiety measures.
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Study: Military children more likely to consider suicide
King 5 News via KHOU-TV
Soldiers aren’t the only ones who need help when they return from deployments. A recent study found that 24.8 of children in military families consider suicide. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 15 percent of adolescents consider suicide. ”It’s upsetting and surprising,” said Adrienne Perez.
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Resting-state functional connectivity as an auxillary diagnosis of depression
Science Codex
According to a paper published in the Neural Regeneration Research, both depressive patients and healthy controls presented typical small-world attributes, and compared with healthy controls, characteristic path length was significantly shorter in depressive patients, suggesting development toward randomization. Patients with depression showed apparently abnormal node attributes at key areas in cortical-striatal-pallidal-thalamic circuits. In addition, right hippocampus and right thalamus were closely linked with the severity of depression.
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For depression, prescribing exercise before medication
The Atlantic
Depression is the most common mental illness — affecting a staggering 25 percent of Americans — but a growing body of research suggests that one of its best cures is cheap and ubiquitous. In 1999, a randomized controlled trial showed that depressed adults who took part in aerobic exercise improved as much as those treated with Zoloft. A 2006 meta-analysis of 11 studies bolstered those findings and recommended that physicians counsel their depressed patients to try it.
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Anti-anxiety drugs tied to higher mortality
The New York Times
A large study has linked several common anti-anxiety drugs and sleeping pills to an increased risk of death, although it’s not certain the drugs were the cause. For more than seven years, researchers followed 34,727 people who filled prescriptions for anti-anxiety medications like Valium and Xanax, or sleep aids like Ambien, Sonata and Lunesta, comparing them with 69,418 controls who did not.
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About Anxiety & Depression Insights
ADAA
This news brief is a timely update about anxiety disorders and depression sent to members of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and other professionals interested in this area. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of the reader. External resources are not a part of the ADAA website, and ADAA is not responsible for the content of external sites. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by ADAA of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site. For more information about ADAA, visit www.ADAA.org.
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