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ADAA's 35th Annual Conference
ADAA
The 35th Annual Conference of ADAA will take place April 9-12, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency Miami in Florida. The submission site is now open. The theme is Anxiety and Depression: Translating Research, Innovating Practice. Kerry Ressler M.D., Ph.D. and Tanja Jovanovic Ph.D., conference chairs, invite submissions that reflect current practice and research relevant to anxiety, OCD, PTSD, depression and related disorders. ADAA is a unique conference of clinicians and researchers involving professionals from multiple disciplines including psychology, psychiatry, social work, counseling and neuroscience. The meeting offers CE and CME credits for professionals and discounted rates for students, residents and trainees.
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TAKING ACTION


Earn CE online
ADAA
Twelve workshops from the ADAA Annual Conference this past March are available to download and earn CE credits from home. Workshop topics include generalized anxiety disorder, selective mutism, anxiety and depression in children, hoarding, panic, autism and anxiety and more.
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Transitioning to DSM-5 and ICD-10-CM
SAMHSA
July 8, Free Webinar and CME
The Fifth Edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), developed by the American Psychiatric Association (APA), is the compendium of mental disorder criteria and diagnostic codes used by clinicians in the U.S. healthcare system. Since its release in May 2013, clinicians and outside organizations have expressed to the APA and SAMHSA a need to know more about DSM-5's approach to diagnostic coding.

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Beyond resilience and PTSD: Flexibility and heterogeneity following potential trauma
International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies
Presented by George Bonanno, Ph.D.
Tuesday, July 8, 12-1:30 p.m. CDT
For more information, contact istss@istss.org

Highly aversive or potentially traumatic events (PTEs) are more common than is usually assumed. Indeed, most people are exposed to multiple PTEs during the course of their lives. Until recently, however, responses to such events have been understood using either psychopathological categories, such as PTSD, or measures of central tendency (e.g., average differences).

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RESEARCH AND PRACTICE NEWS


Bipolar remission influenced by anxiety and OCD
Medwire News
Anxiety disorders and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) may reduce the likelihood of achieving remission for patients with bipolar disorder, study findings indicate. Generally, comorbid disorders were more likely to prevent remission in the first, rather than second, year of follow-up and had a greater impact on recovery from depressive rather than manic symptoms, report Michael Berk of Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia, and colleagues.
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Boston Marathon bombings had lasting psychological effect on children
NBC News
Children who attended the Boston Marathon on the day of the 2013 bombings had a sixfold increased risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder than those who were not at the scene, a study in the journal Pediatrics showed. Researchers also found youths exposed to the manhunt after the attacks showed signs of emotional disturbances and other problems.
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Depression and anxiety predict postsurgical pain in women with gynecologic cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Depression and anxiety, not just inflammation, predict pain intensity and interference with daily life among women recovering from gynecologic cancer surgery, according to findings from a longitudinal, prospective study, presented at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. “Our results suggest that depression, anxiety and inflammation may exacerbate pain following surgery for gynecologic cancer,” concluded lead author Kelsey Honerlaw of the University of Wisconsin's School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin, and coauthors.
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Death of loved one linked to onset of psychiatric disorders
Healio
A study in the American Journal of Psychiatry found that sudden death of a loved one was associated with a greater risk of developing multiple psychiatric disorders, particularly among older people. The most common disorders were alcohol use disorder and major depressive episodes, researchers found.
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Inflammation may help explain depression, diabetes link
Reuters
People with both depression and diabetes have higher markers of inflammation in their blood than those with diabetes alone, a new study suggests. Researchers have known that people with diabetes have a higher rate of depression than those without the blood sugar disorder. And people with both conditions tend to do worse over the long run than people with diabetes but no depression.
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Study: When parents are injured, children may get PTSD
GMA News
Children are susceptible to developing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, when their parents are seriously injured, a new study suggests. Researchers studied 175 pairs of parents and school-age children seen at a Seattle trauma center. They found that uninjured children whose parents were seriously hurt were twice as likely to experience PTSD symptoms months later as those whose parents were uninjured.
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Why stress triggers depression in some people, resilience in others
Forbes
Some people naturally get energized by the challenge, even if it’s a frightening or intimidating one, and can’t wait to overcome it. Others feel dwarfed by the stress and just want to hide from it – this is called depression. Researchers and psychologists have long tried to tease apart why people have such different reactions to stress, and now a new study offers more clues about what’s going on in the brain to explain this difference in people’s responses.
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Using CBT effectively for treating depression and anxiety
Clinical Psychiatry News
Fewer than 20 percent of people seeking help for depression and anxiety disorders receive cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), the most established evidence-based psychother­apeutic treatment. Efforts are being made to increase access to CBT, but a substantial barrier remains: therapist training is a strong predictor of treatment outcome, and many therapists offering CBT services are not sufficiently trained to deliver multiple manual-based interventions with adequate fidelity to the model.
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Suicides are more likely late at night, researchers find
The Washington Post
It seems that everything gets worse at night — especially the blues. There’s now evidence that it isn’t just you or pseudo-scientific folklore: people who are awake in the middle of the night are three to six times more likely to commit suicide, according to a forthcoming research paper. The study by University of Pennsylvania researchers is the first to look at whether the time of day affects the prevalence of suicide among people who are actually awake at those times.
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CBT-I delivered by health educators eased insomnia in older adults
Family Practice News
Cognitive behavioral therapy tailored for insomnia management and delivered by health educators eased sleep impairment in older adults in a randomized trial of 159 community-dwelling veterans aged 60 years or older with chronic insomnia. Researchers assigned the veterans to individual cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), group CBT-I, or general sleep education and hygiene as a control.
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Light treatment improves sleep, depression, agitation in Alzheimer's
HealthCanal
A new study suggests that light treatment tailored to increase circadian stimulation during the day may improve sleep, depression and agitation in people with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia. Results show that exposure to the tailored light treatment during daytime hours for four weeks significantly increased sleep quality, efficiency and total sleep duration. It also significantly reduced scores for depression and agitation.
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Innovative new treatment for depression offers hope to patients
Today Health
Although depression is treatable, most commonly with medications or counseling, many never seek help, often because they are too embarrassed or ashamed. Now, Dr. Andrew Leuchter, a psychiatrist at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at University of California, Los Angeles, says there's an innovative new treatment called synchronized transcranial magnetic stimulation, or sTMS, that may have the potential to provide relief. Dr. Leuchter says it syncs to each patient's brain, then stimulates it with low levels of magnetic energy, 30 minutes a day for several weeks.
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Electroconvulsive a potential lifesaver in comorbid PTSD, major depression
Medscape (free subscription)
The use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comorbid major depression may substantially reduce the risk for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and suicide in this patient population, new research suggests. A retrospective study conducted by investigators at Captain James Lovell Federal Health Care Center – Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science in North Chicago, Illinois, showed that among patients with PTSD and major depressive disorder, the death rate among those who did not receive ECT was significantly greater than that of their counterparts who received ECT.
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Depression with atypical features associated with obesity
Science Codex
Major depressive disorder (MDD) with atypical features (including mood reactivity where people can feel better when positive things happen in life, increased appetite or weight gain) appears to be associated with obesity. At baseline, 7.6 percent of participants met the criteria for MDD. Among the participants with MDD, about 10 percent had atypical and melancholic episodes, 14 percent had atypical episodes, 29 percent had melancholic episodes and 48 percent had unspecified episodes.
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Brain protein may be cause of high rates of depression in peri-menopause
Epoch Times
A new study suggests that elevated levels of a specific brain protein may explain why so many women experience depression during peri-menopause. The work, led by Toronto scientist Dr. Jeffrey Meyer, concludes that high levels of a chemical called monoamine oxidase A, or MAO-A, may be to blame. The protein is known to break down other brain chemicals such as serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine, which help to maintain normal mood.
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Maternal depression more frequent after postpartum period
Brian Blogger
Postpartum depression has many negative consequences for the mother and her child, and society is right to promote awareness of this condition. But now, a study of new mothers indicates that depression is more common four years after childbirth than at any point during the postpartum period.
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About Anxiety & Depression Insights
ADAA
This news brief is a timely update about anxiety disorders and depression sent to members of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and other professionals interested in this area. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of the reader. External resources are not a part of the ADAA website, and ADAA is not responsible for the content of external sites. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by ADAA of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site. For more information about ADAA, visit www.ADAA.org.
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Anxiety & Depression Insights
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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