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ADAA EXCLUSIVES
 




ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION CONFERENECE 2016

2016 Call for Presentations
ADAA
Submit your abstracts for the Anxiety and Depression Conference, March 31-April 3, in Philadelphia, by Aug. 12.
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ADAA PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION


Earn CE credits through ADAA's continuing education program
ADAA
ADAA is expanding its continuing education program and now offers Professional Webinars and Online Group Consultation for CE credit.
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RESOURCES


Teen Depression Brochure — updated
NIMH
This newly revised publication from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is available online and in print.
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Caring for Adult Patients with Suicide Risk: A Consensus Guide for Emergency Departments
SAMHSA
This new resource provides research- and consensus-based practices in decision support, initial interventions and discharge planning for emergency departments (ED).
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POPULAR MEDIA


The Mental Health Issue
The New York Times Magazine
In this issue, contributing authors discuss the scientific, cultural and personal aspects of mental health in an effort to shed light on what fundamentally remains the darkest and least knowable realm of human experience.
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7 celebrities describe what it's like to suffer a panic attack
The Huffington Post
Over 40 million adults in the U.S. suffer from anxiety and panic disorders. And as put together as they may seem, celebrities are no exception when it comes to panic attacks. Whether it's a one-time event or something they consistently struggle with, dealing with a panic attack is never easy — and these celebrities are the first to admit it.
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Obsessive compulsive disorder: Myths, causes and treatments
Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Most people have strange, intrusive thoughts. They can be embarrassing or completely irrational, so we don't often talk about them. For some, however, these thoughts are impossible to stop, and can lead to obsessive compulsive disorder. Lynne Malcolm and Olivia Willis report.
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RESEARCH AND PRACTICE NEWS


Depression and Anxiety
ADAA
Read the latest research on diagnostic issues in the July 2015 issue of Depression and Anxiety. Journal access is free with ADAA membership.
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Technology and PTSD care: An update
PTSD Research Quarterly
This issue of the Research Quarterly provides a guide to the rapidly expanding literature on the effectiveness of technology-based approaches.
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Research update: Advancement in treatment studies for PTSD
Real Warriors
This article highlights current research on transcranial magnetic stimulation, stellate ganglion block and genome-wide association studies.
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Why CBT is falling out of favor
The Guardian
Everybody loves cognitive behavioral therapy. It's the no-nonsense, quick and relatively cheap approach to mental suffering — with none of that Freudian bollocks, and plenty of scientific backing. So it was unsettling to learn, from a paper in the journal Psychological Bulletin, that it seems to be getting less effective over time. Researchers concluded that CBT is roughly half as effective in treating depression as it used to be. What's going on?
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Antidepressants linked to bone fractures in menopausal women
MedPage Today
Women taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to treat menopausal symptoms are up to 76 percent more likely to break a bone, according to an observational study. The increased risk persists for at least five years following initiation of SSRI treatment, suggesting that shortening treatment could reduce the risk, said researchers in the journal Injury Prevention.
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Are too many young Americans getting antipsychotics for ADHD?
HealthDay News
A growing number of teens and young adults are being prescribed powerful antipsychotics, even though the medications aren't approved to treat two disorders — ADHD and depression — they are commonly used for, a new study shows. Researchers found that antipsychotic use rose among children aged 13 and older — from 1.1 percent in 2006 to nearly 1.2 percent in 2010.
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Studies show how mental health issues affect certain ethnic groups
The Medical News
Chronic disease and mental health issues disproportionately affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two new studies by the UCLA Center for Culture, Trauma and Mental Health Disparities shed light on the causes and impacts of this disparity.
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Walking in nature found to reduce rumination
Medical Xpress
A team of researchers working at Stanford University has found that people walking in a "natural" environment tend to engage in less rumination. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes an experiment they conducted to measure one type of self-destructive behavior, and what they learned from it.
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Comorbid anxiety 'a crucial target' for treatment in bipolar disorder
The Medical News
Almost half of patients with bipolar disorder will have comorbid anxiety disorder in their lifetime, show the findings of a systematic review and meta-analysis. The finding "brings home a key message for planning of clinical services," says Barbara Pavlova and fellow researchers in The Lancet Psychiatry.
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Brain scans could predict how effective OCD treatment will be
Medical News Today
Doctors may be able to predict how people with obsessive-compulsive disorder will respond to therapy using a simple brain scan, according to the findings of a new study. The study, published in Frontiers in Psychiatry, is the first to use brain connectivity to predict the progression of a condition after treatment, as well as being the first to assess the impact of cognitive behavioral therapy on brain network connectivity.
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Sleep problems may contribute to health disparities in America
HealthDay News
Undiagnosed sleep disorders, including sleep apnea, are common among older U.S. adults, especially among certain minority groups, a new study finds. The researchers — who looked at 2,230 men and women aged 54 to 93 — say troubled sleep may play a role in health disparities in America. The study was published in the June issue of Sleep.
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How probiotics may help ease social anxiety
ABC News
You're probably aware of the benefits of probiotics for digestive health, which include reduced bloating and management of irritable bowel syndrome. What you may not know is that probiotics are also tied to a slew of additional health benefits, from skin and oral health, to immune support, cholesterol reduction and even weight control. A new study published in the journal Psychiatry Research shows that consuming these "good" bacteria in fermented foods may also help curb social anxiety.
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The strange link between junk food and depression
TIME
Of our many modern diseases, one of the biggest burdens on society is an unexpected one: depression, according to the World Health Organization. And what we eat may be contributing, finds a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
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Antidepressant may aid in treatment of anxiety
Medscape
The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist vilazodone, currently approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder in adults, is also effective in relieving anxiety symptoms in patients with generalized anxiety disorder. The finding, from a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, was presented recently at the American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology 2015 Annual Meeting.
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PTSD raises women's risks of heart attack and stroke
Medical News Today
Women with post-traumatic stress disorder have up to a 60 percent higher chance of a heart attack or stroke, according to a study of almost 50,000 participants. In the first study to examine trauma exposure, post-traumatic stress disorder and onset of cardiovascular disease exclusively in women, those with no PTSD symptoms but who reported traumatic events had 45 percent higher rates of cardiovascular disease. The results are published in the journal Circulation.
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Major depression tied to smaller hippocampus
Medical News Today
The largest international study to compare brain volumes of people with major depression to those of healthy people finds the former tend to have a significantly smaller hippocampus. The researchers report their findings in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.
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About Anxiety & Depression Insights

This news brief is a timely update about anxiety disorders and depression sent to members of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and other professionals interested in this area. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of the reader. External resources are not a part of the ADAA website, and ADAA is not responsible for the content of external sites. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by ADAA of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site. For more information about ADAA, visit www.ADAA.org.
 



Anxiety & Depression Insights
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Cait Harrison, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2657  
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