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ADAA NEWS

2015 Anxiety and Depression Conference — April 9-12
ADAA
Online submissions are open for the 2015 Anxiety and Depression Conference, April 9-12, at the Hyatt Regency Miami in Florida.

Save the dates and plan to attend. This is the best place to network, connect with others who have expertise in this area, discuss new research, generate referrals and expand your network. Earn up to 30 CME or CE credits attending four days of educational sessions including Master Clinician workshops. This continuing education meeting does one of the best jobs translating research and presenting treatment and practice information focusing on children and adults. As ADAA member Darin D. Dougherty, M.D. MSc, puts it, “The immense value is having all of this under one tent.”
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RESEARCH AND PRACTICE NEWS


IOM report on PTSD treatment
Institute of Medicine
The Institute of Medicine (IOM) released a report in June, Treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder In Military and Veterans Populations, stating that government care provided to service members and veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suffers from inadequate management and tracking, leaving officials unable to determine the effectiveness of treatment programs.

The report recommends a range of actions, including implementation of a system to document patients' progress — regardless of whether they get treatment or long-term follow-up — clear training standards for all providers and greater engagement of family members in veterans' treatment.

ADAA members, Edna Foa, Mohammed Milad and Barbara Rothbaum served on the IOM committee.

The IOM report noted that about five percent of patients in the military's health system have PTSD and that the DOD and the VA spent more than $3 billion in 2012 on screening, diagnosing and treating PTSD. It stated that PTSD is a signature injury of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and described it as putting a "staggering" burden on the forces that were deployed. The number of veterans of all eras who sought care for PTSD from the VA more than doubled from 2003 to 2012, from approximately 190,000 veterans to more than half a million. PTSD is the third most common major service-connected disability after hearing loss and tinnitus.

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Can psychosocial treatments for children be improved?
Depression and Anxiety
Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric disorders diagnosed in children. Both antidepressant medications and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are efficacious although ∼30–40 percent of anxious youth do not clinically respond and many responders remain symptomatic. CBT is a broad term that encompasses a fairly wide range of treatment elements including psychoeducation, exposure therapy, cognitive restructuring, relaxation training, diaphragmatic breathing, contingent reinforcement and modeling. Accepted interventions for childhood anxiety include some or all of these components in varying degrees and intensities. However, it is unclear of the extent to which all treatment elements are created equal.
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Understanding biological underpinnings of anxiety, phobias and PTSD
Medical Xpress
Fear in a mouse brain looks much the same as fear in a human brain. When a frightening stimulus is encountered, the thalamus shoots a message to the amygdala — the primitive part of the brain — even before it informs the parts responsible for higher cognition. The amygdala then goes into its hard-wired fight-or-flight response, triggering a host of predictable symptoms, including racing heart, heavy breathing, startle response and sweating.
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Study: 2 classes of anti-depressants to treat cancer related depression found
Headlines & Global News
Researchers claim to have found two classes of anti-depressants that effectively reduce depression symptoms in cancer patients. Limited research is available about anti-depressants in treating cancer-related depression. Dartmouth researchers, in a bid to identify best practice for the treatment of depression in cancer, completed a systematic review and meta-analysis of existing research.
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University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers show how early stress hurts brain development
Journal Sentinel
A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has shown that chronic stress of poverty, neglect and physical abuse in early life may shrink the parts of a child's developing brain responsible for memory, learning and processing emotion. While early-life stress already has been linked to depression, anxiety, heart disease, cancer and a lack of educational and employment success, researchers have long been seeking to understand what part of the brain is affected by stress to help guide interventions.
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Maternal anxiety disorders linked to excessive infant crying
MedicalResearch
Two hundred and eighty-six mother-infant couples were investigated from the Maternal Anxiety in Relation to Infant Development (MARI) Study from Dresden, Germany, via standardized interview and questionnaire. It was found that there was a robust relation from maternal lifetime anxiety disorders as early as prior to pregnancy to excessive crying in the offspring. Also, the association increased when considering incident anxiety disorders during pregnancy and after delivery.
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Study analyzes difference between day hospital and inpatient stay in depression
News-Medical
A study published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics has analyzed the difference between day hospital and inpatient stay in depression. Depending on the severity of depression, patients may be treated at different levels of care with psychotherapy and/or antidepressant medication. While several previous studies compared the efficacy of different levels of care for psychotherapy of personality disorders, sufficient data is lacking for the comparison of day-clinic and inpatient psychotherapy for depression.
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Headache, depression and mild traumatic brain injury: A complex relationship
Medscape (free subscription)
Headache and depression have a complicated relationship, especially after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Just how intertwined these conditions are was highlighted in a new study presented at the American Headache Society (AHS) 56th Annual Scientific Meeting. A year after suffering an mTBI, patients with headache were about 5 times more likely to be depressed than patients with mTBI without headache, and those who were depressed were more likely to suffer headaches, the study showed.
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Researchers discover how 'magic mushrooms' affect the brain
HealthDay News
When people take the drug known as "magic mushrooms," their brain shows a pattern of activity that is similar to that seen with dreaming, new research reveals. British scientists pointed out that their findings are consistent with the vivid yet dream-like states often associated with psychedelic drugs, which include LSD and magic mushrooms. By learning how these drugs work, their possible therapeutic uses can be more fully investigated, the study authors suggested.
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New study finds that growth hormone treatment could lead to depression in children
News-Medical
Short, otherwise healthy children who are treated with growth hormone (GH) may become taller, but they may also become more depressed and withdrawn over time, compared to children the same age and height who are not treated with GH, a new study finds. The results were presented in a poster June 23, at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago.
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Study: Turmeric can fight cancer, depression disorder
The New Indian Express
Giving a push to the nutraceutical qualities of turmeric, Australian universities have found out that the yellow spice can be used in fighting cancer and depression. Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid derived from turmeric influences several biological mechanisms associated with major depression, namely those associated with monoaminergic activity, immune-inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways, hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and neuroprogression, the study said.
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Major depression increases risk of death in older adults
Counsel & Heal
Major depression can be a highly debilitating disease that prevents people from carrying out daily activities. In a new study, researchers examined the effects of major depression on older American adults' lifespan. They discovered that the mental illness greatly increases risk of death in adults aged 50 and older.
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Lead exposure may cause depression and anxiety in children
NPR
Lead is well known for causing permanent behavioral and cognitive problems in children, but a study says it may also cause less obvious problems like depression, too, even at low levels. That's the word from a study tracking the health of 1,341 children in Jintan, China, where the health effects of pollution from rapid development have become a national concern.
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CBT with drug therapy cuts depression relapse in kids compared to medicines alone
PsychCentral
A combination of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) along with medication enhances treatment for children and adolescents suffering from depression. In a new clinical trial, investigators discovered depression relapse rates were substantially lower in a group of youths who received both forms of treatment versus medication alone.
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About Anxiety & Depression Insights

This news brief is a timely update about anxiety disorders and depression sent to members of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and other professionals interested in this area. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of the reader. External resources are not a part of the ADAA website, and ADAA is not responsible for the content of external sites. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by ADAA of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site. For more information about ADAA, visit www.ADAA.org.
 



Anxiety & Depression Insights
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