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ADAA NEWS

National Suicide Prevention Month is here
ADAA
September is National Suicide Prevention Month. The recent loss of Robin Williams and others whose lives have ended due to suicide are reminders of the great need for increased public awareness about how to prevent suicide. Approximately 40,000 individuals across the lifespan end their lives by suicide each year. In a recent online poll at the ADAA website, 82 percent responded said that they or a loved one had considered suicide at some time. Both depression and anxiety carry a high risk of suicide," says Mark Pollack, M.D., ADAA President and Grainger Professor and Chairman, Department of Psychiatry at Rush University Medical Center. "More than 90 percent of those who commit suicide have a diagnosable illness such as clinical depression, and often in combination with anxiety or substance use disorders and other treatable mental disorders."

As mental health professionals we have a responsibility to thoughtfully begin the conversation with patients, colleagues and the broader community. ADAA offers resources on suicide prevention, treatment and education.

In memory of Robin Williams, Los Angeles Creamery Artisan Ice Cream will donate 5 percent of all sales to ADAA. If you're in Southern California, eat something good to do some good. Offer good until Sept. 12.
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Still time to submit for the 2015 conference
ADAA
ADAA invites psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, neuroscientists and others working in the area of anxiety and depressive disorders to submit abstracts for peer-review for the 2015 Anxiety and Depression Conference to be held in Miami, Florida, April 9-12. The deadline is Sept. 8, for symposia, roundtables and workshops. The theme for this year’s conference is Anxiety and Depression: Translating Research, Innovating Practice. Abstracts are due Sept. 8; research poster abstracts are due Dec. 5. Program information is available at ADAA’s website, ADAA.org.
Submit now.

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Survey about use of mobile mental health apps
McMaster University
Participate in a survey conducted by McMaster University about the attitudes of mental health professionals towards the use of mobile mental health apps in clinical practice, and to understand which clinician characteristics may influence these attitudes. The survey will take 5 minutes and is completely confidential. Participants can enter a drawing for an iPad.
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Mobile app reviews
ADAA
ADAA reviews mobile apps for anxiety and depression and posts the reviews online for clinicians and patients.
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Earn CE online
ADAA
Earn CE from home by downloading up to twelve workshops on topics including generalized anxiety disorder, selective mutism, anxiety and depression in children, hoarding, panic, autism and anxiety and more. The workshops were presented at the ADAA Annual Conference in March.
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RESEARCH AND PRACTICE NEWS


Study: Ketamine shows promise in reducing suicidal ideation
Medscape (free subscription)
An analysis of four previously published studies found that ketamine appeared to be effective in curbing suicidal thoughts independently of reductions in depressive symptoms in patients with treatment-resistant depression. A randomized controlled study involving acutely suicidal patients, however, is still needed to conclude that the drug reduces suicidal thoughts, said lead researcher Elizabeth Ballard. The findings appeared in the Journal of Psychiatric Research.
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CDC: Many US teens with mental problems receive counseling
Live Science
Between 2010 and 2012, approximately 70 percent of teens suffering from serious emotional or behavioral problems received mental health services other than medication, such as counseling, a CDC report found. Boys were more likely than girls to receive counseling, the report said.
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Combining cognitive therapy, drugs may work better for severe depression
HealthDay News
Combining cognitive therapy with antidepressants was more effective than medication alone in helping patients with severe short-term depression, according to a study in JAMA Psychiatry. The combination, however, was not better than antidepressants alone for patients with mild or severe, chronic depression.
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Potential biomarker for post-traumatic stress disorder
Medical Xpress
Blood expression levels of genes targeted by the stress hormones called glucocorticoids could be a biomarker of risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a study conducted in rats by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published Aug. 11, in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That also makes the steroid hormones' receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor, a potential target for new drugs.
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Collaborative care yields better outcomes in teen depression
HealthDay News via Phyician's Briefing
Teens with depression who received collaborative care saw more improvements in symptoms than the usual care group, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Collaborative care also was associated with a greater likelihood of depression response and remission at 12 months.
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Prenatal antidepressant use may raise ADHD risk in children
The Boston Globe
Children exposed to antidepressants while in the womb were 80 percent more likely to develop attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder than unexposed peers, according to preliminary findings of a study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. Women suffering from depression or any mental disorder had a greater likelihood of having a child with autism regardless of whether they used antidepressants while pregnant, the researchers found.
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Suicide and depression: Childhood burn survivors are at higher risk, study finds
Headlines & Global News
Children who survive childhood burns are at a higher risk of suicidal thoughts and depression as adults, a new study finds. The study was conducted by researchers from University of Adelaide. Researchers examined 272 people who were hospitalized for burns during childhood from 1980-1990. Among these, 58 percent of the burns were scalds and 17 percent were flame burns.
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Serotonin may not be a major factor in depression, study suggests
Medical News Today
New evidence has put into doubt the long-standing belief that a deficiency in serotonin - a chemical messenger in the brain - plays a central role in depression. In the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, scientists have reported that mice lacking the ability to make serotonin in their brains did not show depression-like symptoms.
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Study: Intervention in primary care better for depressed teens
KABC-TV
About 20 percent of teens will experience depression before they reach adulthood. Studies show most of the depressive episodes happen between the ages of 12 and 17. Many just don't get the help they need, but now a new report finds pediatricians can effectively treat depression in kids with the right strategy.
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Interaction of the ADRB2 gene polymorphism with childhood trauma in predicting adult symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder
JAMA Psychiatry
Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), while highly prevalent, develops only in a subset of trauma-exposed individuals. Genetic risk factors in interaction with trauma exposure have been implicated in PTSD vulnerability. The objective of this study was to examine the association of 3755 candidate gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms with PTSD development in interaction with a history of childhood trauma.
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Study: Young adults who had depression have 'hyper-connected' brain networks
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Young adults who struggled with depression in adolescence appear to have "hyper-connected" networks in their brain, researchers are reporting. The findings might improve understanding of depression and could lead to new ways to predict, prevent and treat the illness, according to the University of Illinois at Chicago researchers. The researchers conducted brain scans on 30 volunteers, ages 18 to 23, who had depression in their teen years, and a control group of 23 young adults who never had depression.
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Collaborative care for adolescents with depression in primary care
JAMA
Up to 20 percent of adolescents experience an episode of major depression by age 18 years yet few receive evidence-based treatments for their depression. The objective of this study was to determine whether a collaborative care intervention for adolescents with depression improves depressive outcomes compared with usual care.
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Depressive symptoms in preschoolers may linger throughout childhood
HealthDay News
Children who were diagnosed with depression at ages 3 to 5 were more than twice as likely to meet the criteria for clinical depression six years later than those without depressive symptoms as preschoolers, according to a study in the American Journal of Psychiatry. Researchers also found that conduct disorder and maternal depression were associated with a greater risk of depression.
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About Anxiety & Depression Insights

This news brief is a timely update about anxiety disorders and depression sent to members of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and other professionals interested in this area. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of the reader. External resources are not a part of the ADAA website, and ADAA is not responsible for the content of external sites. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by ADAA of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site. For more information about ADAA, visit www.ADAA.org.
 



Anxiety & Depression Insights
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