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ADAA NEWS

Seeking advice from New England clinicians
ADAA
ADAA and the Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program are working together to survey and assess the need for clinical training opportunities to help behavioral health clinicians treat post 9/11 military veterans and their families. At least 40 percent of veterans will choose to get their health care in community non-VA settings this year, and Home Base is developing clinical education for behavioral health providers. Please respond by Oct. 17. This survey should take about 15 minutes. Thank you for your advice on improving care for returning veterans and their families. To participate in this confidential survey, click here.
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TAKING ACTION


National depression screening — Oct. 9
Screening for Mental Health, Inc.
Dedicated to raising awareness and screening people for depression and related mood and anxiety disorders, National Depression Screening Day is the nation's oldest voluntary, community-based screening program that gives access to validated screening questionnaires and provides referral information for treatment. Find information about NDSD.
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RESEARCH AND PRACTICE NEWS


Study: Antidepressants rapidly alter brain architecture
Los Angeles Times
A single dose of a popular class of psychiatric drug used to treat depression can alter the brain’s architecture within hours, even though most patients usually don’t report improvement for weeks, a new study suggests. More than 1 in 10 adults in the U.S. use these drugs, which adjust the availability of a chemical transmitter in the brain, serotonin, by blocking the way it is reabsorbed.
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Sport, physical activity help against depression
University of Bern via ScienceDaily
Depression is the most frequently diagnosed mental illness. In the western industrial nations, at least every tenth person suffers from depression once in the course of their life. Depression influences physical health more than diabetes or arthritis, clinicians say, and treatment of depression traditionally occurs with antidepressants and psychotherapy. But as research has shown, sport and physical activity partially encounters the same neurophysiological changes as antidepressants.
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Turmeric enhances mood in depression research trial
Medical Xpress
The antidepressant benefits of the Indian spice turmeric have been supported by the results of a trial run by a Murdoch University researcher. Dr Adrian Lopresti from the School of Psychology and Exercise Science studied the effects of curcumin, the medicinal compound which gives turmeric its distinctive yellow color, in a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study of 56 volunteers with a major depressive disorder. Half were treated with a patented curcumin extract, 500mg twice daily, and the other half took a placebo for eight weeks.
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Study shows teen depression lowers when they feel they can change
North Dallas Gazette
A low-cost, one-time intervention that educates teens about the changeable nature of personality traits may prevent depressive symptoms often seen during the transition to high school, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin. The findings, published online in September in Clinical Psychological Science, show that exposure to a brief message that people can change could reduce depression symptoms among teenagers during the first few weeks of high school.
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Evidence of genetic link to post-traumatic stress disorder in soldiers exposed to childhood trauma
Medical News Today
While abnormalities in the adrenergic and noradrenergic systems, both integral in the fight-or-flight response, are thought to play a role in the development of post-traumatic stress disorder, until now there has been no genetic evidence of this connection. A collaborative study just released by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the University of Michigan found an interaction between the ADRB2 gene and childhood adversity.
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Immune link to stress could help in treating depression
Medical Xpress
Researchers at the University of Adelaide say a new focus on the links between the immune system and stress is needed to help pave the way for improved treatments of severe depression. In a paper published in Frontiers in Neuroscience, a team based in the University's School of Medical Sciences argues that current treatments for major depressive disorder lack effectiveness, pointing to other underlying causes of depression that have so far gone untreated.
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Sedentary lifestyle linked to depression
Reuters via Chicago Tribune
A new analysis of previous studies ties too much sitting at the computer or lying around watching TV to a greater risk of depression. Based on dozens of studies covering hundreds of thousands of participants, Chinese researchers found that sedentary behavior was linked to a 25 percent higher likelihood of being depressed compared to people who were not sedentary.
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Drugs for anxiety, sleep linked to Alzheimer's disease
By: Denise A. Valenti
Drugs used to modify behavior in young or middle-aged adults may have serious consequences in later life. Recent research has demonstrated that extended use of benzodiazepine drugs — commonly used for the management of anxiety and sleep dysfunction — increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. The longer the drugs are in use for a patient, the greater the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease.
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Post-traumatic stress disorder in women linked to food addiction
Medical News Today
A new study published in JAMA Psychiatry links post-traumatic stress disorder to heightened food addiction, potentially explaining why past research has associated the disorder with increased risk of obesity. Post-traumatic stress disorder affects around 7.7 million adults in the U.S. It is an anxiety disorder that occurs after experiencing frightening or stressful events.
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Behavioral therapy deemed best for social phobia
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Antidepressants are commonly used to treat social phobia, but a new report argues that "talk therapy" is the better first option. In a review of 101 clinical trials, researchers found that "cognitive behavioral therapy" often helped people with social phobia — a type of anxiety disorder where people have a deep fear of being judged by others or embarrassed in public. The findings appear in The Lancet Psychiatry.
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New blood test may help diagnose depression
Medical Xpress
The World Health Organization has determined that depressive disorders are the leading cause of disability worldwide. The recurrent and chronic forms of depression account for the bulk of the problem. Developed by researchers at the Northwestern University, the new blood test measures blood levels of nine different RNA molecules that seem to differ significantly between healthy people and people suffering from depression.
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Research shows possible neurological patterns for PTSD symptoms
HealthDay News via Doctors Lounge
Imaging technology has shed new light on how certain symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) manifest in the brain, according to a new study. Researchers identified a specific opioid receptor in the brain linked to emotion that is also associated with a specific group of PTSD symptoms, including listlessness and emotional detachment. They suggested their findings could help doctors develop targeted, or personalized treatments for the condition.
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About Anxiety & Depression Insights

This news brief is a timely update about anxiety disorders and depression sent to members of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and other professionals interested in this area. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of the reader. External resources are not a part of the ADAA website, and ADAA is not responsible for the content of external sites. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by ADAA of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site. For more information about ADAA, visit www.ADAA.org.
 



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