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INDUSTRY UPDATES

Trenton architect says recycling old structures is the ultimate example of thinking green
For The Times
Outside Annabelle Radcliffe-Trenner’s office window on West State Street in Trenton, the buildings — some neglected, some abandoned, some glorious — give testimony to her passionate belief in architectural restoration, and to the beauty of old construction. “I always knew I wanted to be an architect. But the idea of a green field site and designing a new building on it was quite terrifying,” said Radcliffe-Trenner during an interview at her office in the historic Emlen House on West State Street. “And it felt environmentally wrong. Recycling old buildings is the greenest thing you can do."
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New York architect loses copyright infringement lawsuit
The Magazine of the American Institute of Architects
On June 5, a New York-based federal appeals courts tackled the tricky question of how to define originality in architecture, ruling against an architect who claimed two construction companies copied his designs for colonial homes. The 29-page Zalewski v. Cicero Builder Dev. opinion breaks no new legal ground, but it underscores the difficulty that courts face in determining where imitation ends and originality begins in the design of buildings. It also suggests that for architects, taking creative risks can, paradoxically, offer more security — at least in terms of their intellectual property.
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New Jersey beach tour celebrates '50s motel architecture
The Courant
In the late 1950s and early 1960s about 300 futuristic mom and pop motels existed in this beach town then going through a tourism explosion. Today there are about 100, and it's because Wildwood-based entrepreneurs and home builders, such as brothers Lewis and Wilbert Morey, had an idea. Why not make it convenient for recreation seekers to stay overnight near the beach? They wanted their motels to architecturally reflect the happy times and the sparkling future.
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Strengthening self-repairing polymers through regeneration
The Magazine of the American Institute of Architects
Self-healing materials have made recent headlines for their remarkable ability to emulate the restorative capacities of human skin. Much of that innovation has been around the ability to repair tiny fractures and fissures — until now. In May, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign announced the development of a polymer that is designed not only to heal, but also to regenerate.
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Tour of Paterson downtown attracts fans of architect who shaped the city
The Record
Richard Polton was so impressed with the architect who shaped Paterson’s downtown with his work on retail, residential and public buildings that he wrote a book about him. But Polton also wants to share the architect’s legacy with others. On June 7, he did just that with a free walking tour of downtown Paterson that highlighted the work of Fred Wesley Wentworth, who had a 20-year career in the city that ended in the late 1920s.
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Rocks on a polluted beach reveal human impact
The Magazine of the American Institute of Architects
The geology community is abuzz with talk of the Anthropocene Epoch — the first geologic era to record a noticeable imprint of human activity. Though the period is typically marked by broad influences such as climate change and biodiversity loss, researchers from Canada’s Western University in Ontario report in this month's issue of the journal GSA Today that contemporary human behaviors are now acutely visible in the earth's physical composition.
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Sea Isle City architecture student designs buildings that withstand hurricanes
Press of Atlantic City
As Hurricane Sandy neared the New Jersey coast in October 2012, and floodwaters began entering his family’s business, Angelo Camano Jr. pulled on a wetsuit and went below to salvage what he could. The historic storm so impressed Camano that months later, as he started his senior thesis for his architecture degree from Drexel University in Philadelphia, he chose the hazards of hurricanes to buildings — storm surges, flooding and high winds — as the problems he wanted to solve. The result of his yearlong research and design project is a site that would feature flood deterrents, such as sand-trapping jetties and secondary dunes, and three buildings, the centerpiece of which would be a modern, teardrop-shaped facility that resembles a whale rising from the water.
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Duke University researchers develop an invisibility cloak for sound
The Magazine of the American Institute of Architects
Structural members can disrupt more than a space’s aesthetics. Acoustics are often a concern, particularly in applications such as auditoriums, where the design must also facilitate communication. Working with metamaterials — substances engineered to have properties not found in nature — researchers at Duke University found a way to keep sound flowing through inanimate objects.
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