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  Mobile version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit       Oct. 10, 2013



 

Use of propofol in executions could result in anesthetic shortage
Medical Daily
The state of Missouri plans to execute a death row inmate this month using for the first time a lethal dose of the widely-used anesthesia drug propofol. The European Union, where most of the U.S. propofol supply is manufactured and capital punishment is banned, is warning that export sanctions may be imposed on the drug, which could cause shortages in the U.S. that may endanger patients' lives.
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Hospital, anesthesiologist absolved in woman's death
Outpatient Surgery News
A California jury has decided a hospital and anesthesiologist weren't negligent in the case of a 40-year-old woman who died in her sleep from internal bleeding after her iliac artery was nicked by a surgeon during a series of three procedures. The surgeon had already settled out of court.
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Report: Keep eye on Medicaid plans
Health News Florida
A research team that has been monitoring Florida's "Medicaid Reform" movement for almost a decade is calling for vigilance as the last patients — those who are sickest and most at risk — are transferred into commercial HMOs. The authors noted with approval that federal health officials have imposed some unprecedented patient-protection requirements on Florida Medicaid as a condition of granting the state's request for a waiver of the usual rules.
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Fluid protocol promises new ERAS in surgery
Anesthesiology News
Programs that promote enhanced recovery after surgery are beneficial for both patients and institutions, according to a recent study that supports the use of the increasingly common treatment plans. Popularized in Europe, so-called ERAS programs are becoming more widespread in the United States, although the data for their overall efficacy here are still lacking. The latest study should help.
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Health technology no substitute for compassion
The Washington Times
Ideally those who rely on technology for diagnosing and treating disease are cautioned to exercise with wisdom. As good as we think we are at maintaining the body by way of scans, apps and sophisticated computer programs, there remains a significant wild-card within the mind of the individual involved. "There are many facets of the patient that tend not to shine through if the electronic medical record is all we have to go on," writes Richard Gunderman, M.D., in a recent column in The Atlantic.
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Merck plans to lay off another 8,500 workers
The New York Times
The pharmaceutical company Merck said it would lay off 8,500 employees, cut $2.5 billion in costs over the next two years and undertake a restructuring of its troubled research and development unit, which has suffered several major setbacks in recent years. The announcement follows a series of major research setbacks in the company's late-stage clinical pipeline. A week ago, the Food and Drug Administration rejected its application for an anticipated anesthesia drug, sugammadex, citing concerns about a hypersensitivity study in patients.
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Telemedicine program gives US doctors glimpse of care in Rwanda
Anesthesiology News
The patient was in terrible shape. She had been stabbed by her husband in the neck and had lost her voice, indicating the knife had gone through her airway. Air was rushing the wound. The biggest concern for the anesthesiologist on duty was to find a way to secure the woman's airway during surgery, knowing that placing a breathing tube down her throat might worsen the injury. But this wasn't Europe or North America. It was Rwanda.
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