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Looking to transform healthcare? — Ask a nurse
Forbes
Traditionally, nurses have been the “face of healthcare” to the patient. According to the American Nurses Association (ANA), the nursing profession involves the “protection, promotion, and optimization of health and abilities, prevention of illness and injury, alleviation of suffering, and advocacy in the care of individuals, families, communities, and populations.” Unfortunately, due to the culture of the healthcare industry, nurses have usually taken a back seat to physicians and administrators when it comes to changing the policies and practices of optimizing care.
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MARN NEWS & UPDATES


ANA Massachusetts Legislative Candidate Forum
Registration Deadline Sept. 30
Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014
5 - 8 p.m.
Hampshire House, Boston, MA
Register Now, http://www.anamass.org/event/candidateforum

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ANA Massachusetts Fall Conference — Registration Deadline Oct. 3!
Call for Posters!
Keeping Patients and Nursing Staff Safe: Challenges and Possibilities Keynote: Janet Haebler, MSN, RN, Associate Director, State Government Affairs, American Nurses Association
Friday, Oct. 17, 2014
Sheraton Framingham Hotel
PLEASE NOTE: The location of the conference has changed to
The VERVE Crowne Plaza Natick
1360 Worcester Street
Natick, MA 01760
Conference Brochure, click here.
Call for Posters, click here. Exhibitor/Sponsorship Opportunities, click here.
Register Now, click here.

Deadline to Register Oct. 3, 2014

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Authors Wanted for the Massachusetts Report on Nursing
Needed: Articles for The December 2014 edition of the Massachusetts Report on Nursing
Remember: The ANA Massachusetts newsletter is read by about 118,000 RNs in the Commonwealth! This is YOUR newsletter so we need YOU to make a contribution!
This year we are focusing on safe staffing and encourage you to weigh in on this important issue!

Your ideas about features to include in future newsletters are always welcome. The more input, the better!!

Your contribution can be sent to myracacace@charter.net or mailed to ANA Massachusetts Newsletter, P. O. Box 285, Milton, MA 02186.

Deadline date for submission is Oct. 10!

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Join Team ANA Massachusetts at the 7th Annual VisionWalk
We are excited to tell you about the 7th Annual Boston VisionWalk. This event will take place Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014 at Artesani Park, 1255 Soldiers Field Road, Brighton, MA 02135 (Registration and Check In is at 12 p.m., Walk Begins at 1 p.m.).

VisionWalk is a fun, family-friendly 5K (3.1 mile) walkathon. The route is wheelchair and stroller accessible. There will be music, refreshments and lots of kids activities – including a visit from Wally the Green Monster.

ANA Massachusetts will have a team walking to support this event. Our Team Captain is Myra Cacace, President Elect and Newsletter Editor.

If you are interested in walking as part of our team, please register using the following link: Team Website: www.FightBlindness.org/goto/ANAMassachusetts

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Looking to transform healthcare? — Ask a nurse
Forbes
Traditionally, nurses have been the “face of healthcare” to the patient. According to the American Nurses Association (ANA), the nursing profession involves the “protection, promotion, and optimization of health and abilities, prevention of illness and injury, alleviation of suffering, and advocacy in the care of individuals, families, communities, and populations.”

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With the emergence of telemedicine, where do nurses fit in?
By Joan Spitrey
Remote medical monitoring is what most frequently think of in regard to telemedicine. If fact, the use of remote monitoring has been in place for more than 40 years, and has be highly effective in rural areas.

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Is there room for scribes in nursing?
By Joan Spitrey
Recently on Twitter, I came across an interesting conversation regarding the usefulness of scribes by physicians. One physician, who never used them, published an article against their use. However, the other physician responded via his blog in praise of their efficient use.

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NURSING & HEALTHCARE NEWS


Stress might be even more unhealthy for the obese
HealthDay News
Recurring emotional stress may trigger a stronger biochemical response in overweight people, possibly increasing their risk of chronic illnesses such as heart disease and Type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. Researchers found that overweight people repeatedly placed in a stressful situation exhibited increasing amounts of interleukin-6, a protein that promotes inflammation in the body, in their saliva. Normal weight people did not exhibit this escalation in interleukin-6 levels when exposed to repeated stress.
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Higher nurse-to-patient standard improves staff safety
Health Canal
A 2004 California law mandating specific nurse-to-patient staffing standards in acute care hospitals significantly lowered job-related injuries and illnesses for both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, according to a UC Davis study published online in the International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health.The study is believed to be the first to evaluate the effect of the law on occupational health.
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Memory complaints could be early indicator of future dementia risk
Medical News Today
Memory slips are regarded by most as a sign of the onset of old age. However, new research has found that those who report memory issues may have an increased chance of developing dementia later on, even if they do not have any outward clinical signs of the disease. "Our study adds strong evidence to the idea that memory complaints are common among older adults and are sometimes indicators of future memory and thinking problems. [Clinicians] should not minimize these complaints and should take them seriously," says study author Richard Kryscio, from the University of Kentucky in Lexington.
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Study: 1 in 10 antibiotics prescriptions fail
Medical News Today
The results of a 20-year study published in the BMJ finds that 1 in 10 of all antibiotic prescriptions fail to treat the infection. This marks an increase in the number of antibiotic failures, which is continuing to rise. Over the past 20 years, there has been such a sharp increase in strains of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics that the World Health Organization have declared the issue a global public health crisis. Despite this, primary care clinicians rarely report problems of antibiotic resistance in their own practices.
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FDA OKs clinical trial for scorpion venom-based Tumor Paint
UPI
With approval from the FDA now secured, Blaze Bioscience, a young biotech company, will move forward with its plans to inject 21 cancer patients with so-called Tumor Paint — a cancer cell-targeting compound derived from the venom of deathstalker scorpions. Tumor Paint doesn't cure cancer. But it's creators believe it can help surgeons more completely eradicate malignant tumors by finding and highlighting all the cancerous cells in a person's body. And by highlighting, researchers really do mean highlighting — glowing bright green.
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The surge in US healthcare jobs: Looking ahead to 2022
By Dorothy L. Tengler
On Monday, Oct. 6, 2009, the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 800 points, closing below 10,000 for the first time since 2004. America was in recession. Since then, the nation's labor market has at least partially recovered. So far in 2014, the United States has added nearly 1.6 million jobs. And through 2022, employment is expected to grow by more than 15 million jobs, or by 11 percent.
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Study suggests common painkillers tied to blood clot risk
HealthDay News
People who use painkillers called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) — which include aspirin, naproxen (Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) — may be at increased risk for potentially deadly blood clots, a new study suggests. The researchers analyzed the results of six studies involving more than 21,000 cases of a type of blood clot called a venous thromboembolism (VTE). These clots include deep vein thrombosis (a clot in the leg) and pulmonary embolism (a clot in the lungs). But the study only showed an association between use of the painkillers and higher clotting risk; it did not prove cause-and-effect.
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System designed to improve hand function lost to nerve damage
Oregon State University via Medical Xpress
Engineers at Oregon State University have developed and successfully demonstrated the value of a simple pulley mechanism to improve hand function after surgery. The device, tested in cadaver hands, is one of the first instruments ever created that could improve the transmission of mechanical forces and movement while implanted inside the body. After continued research, technology such as this may offer new options to people who have lost the use of their hands due to nerve trauma, and ultimately be expanded to improve function of a wide range of damaged joints in the human body.
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Kidney diseased not always a barrier to tPA
MedPage Today
Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) treated with intravenous thrombolytic therapy during ischemic stroke had a higher risk for intracranial hemorrhage and serious systemic hemorrhage, but the risk did not appear to be related to their renal disease, researchers reported. In a study of more than 44,000 patients that examined the safety of IV tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) therapy in stroke patients, the presence of CKD (versus no CKD) was not associated with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (adjusted OR 1.0, 95 percent CI 0.91-1.10, P=0.9510) or serious systemic hemorrhage (adjusted OR 0.97, 95 percent CI 0.80-1.18, P=0.7924), after adjusting for age and comorbidities linked to negative outcomes, according to researchers.
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Lost in translation: The nurse as a conduit
Keith Carlson
As nurses, we are trained to bridge the gap between physicians and patients. In fact, we often serve as conduits of information, translating medical jargon into lay terms while simultaneously maintaining the integrity of the original message. Nurses are in the perfect position to leverage their communication skills in the service of patient outcomes, and that ability to communicate clearly is one of our many individual and collective gifts.
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How engaging patients can improve care and health outcomes
Health Affairs
Patients and caregivers are gaining momentum as powerful new resources in efforts to improve the healthcare system. They are increasingly becoming active partners in their own care, as well as seeking to make the healthcare delivery system more responsive to their needs and easier to navigate. And they are increasingly engaging as collaborators in planning and conducting research, and disseminating its results, with the goal of producing evidence that can help patients and those who care for them make better-informed decisions about the clinical choices they face.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    With the emergence of telemedicine, where do nurses fit in? (By Joan Spitrey)
5 healthcare megatrends to watch for (KevinMD)
Nursing career path evolves, now includes care in community settings (FierceHealthcare)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

ANA Massachusetts Nursing Flash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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