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National nursing shortage fueled by lack of teachers
ABC News
They’re often the first people you see at the doctor’s office, and the first line of defense in any ER – but America’s nursing population is shrinking fast. The nursing shortage may not be caused just by lack of interest. In many ways, it’s caused by lack of capacity. Each year, 80,000 applicants are turned away from nursing schools, often because there aren’t enough teachers or resources to accommodate growing student interest. “Suddenly, we turned around and realized we’re not attracting enough nurses to go into teaching,” said Dr. Kimberly S. Glassman, with patient care services and the chief nursing officer at NYU Langone Medical Center.
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ANA MASSACHUSETTS NEWS & UPDATES


ANA Massachusetts Fall Conference — Register Today!
REGISTRATION DEADLINE THIS WEEK!

Call for Posters!
Keeping Patients and Nursing Staff Safe: Challenges and Possibilities
Keynote: Janet Haebler, MSN, RN, Associate Director, State Government Affairs, American Nurses Association
Friday, Oct. 17, 2014
PLEASE NOTE: The location of the conference has changed to
The VERVE Crowne Plaza Natick
1360 Worcester Street
Natick, MA 01760
Conference Brochure, click here.
Call for Posters, click here.
Exhibitor/Sponsorship Opportunities, click here.
Register Now, click here.

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Authors Wanted for the Massachusetts Report on Nursing
Needed: Articles for The December 2014 edition of the Massachusetts Report on Nursing
Remember: The ANA Massachusetts newsletter is read by about 118,000 RNs in the Commonwealth! This is YOUR newsletter so we need YOU to make a contribution!
This year we are focusing on safe staffing and encourage you to weigh in on this important issue!

Your ideas about features to include in future newsletters are always welcome. The more input, the better!!

Your contribution can be sent to myracacace@charter.net or mailed to ANA Massachusetts Newsletter, P. O. Box 285, Milton, MA 02186.

Deadline date for submission is Oct. 10!

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Public Comment Period open through Oct. 17: Cardiovascular Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, Second Edition
The Cardiovascular Nursing Scope and Standards Revision Workgroup members seek public comments about the draft Cardiovascular Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, Second Edition. The comment period closes on Oct. 17, 2014. Please consider reviewing and providing recommendations for improvements as part of your professional responsibility and accountability. Do invite students, colleagues and other stakeholders to also respond. Access the draft document and response process, here.
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ANA Massachusetts — Legislative Candidate Forum
Oct. 20
at Curry College — 6 p.m.
Please join us for a private reception from 5 - 6 p.m.
(Hors d’eouvres, beer, wine and soda).
Registration Fees (for reception only)
$35.00 ANA MA members
$40.00 non-members
Register Now, click here.

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Join Team ANA Massachusetts at the 7th Annual VisionWalk
We are excited to tell you about the 7th Annual Boston VisionWalk. This event will take place Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014 at Artesani Park, 1255 Soldiers Field Road, Brighton, MA 02135 (Registration and Check In is at 12 p.m., Walk Begins at 1 p.m.).

VisionWalk is a fun, family-friendly 5K (3.1 mile) walkathon. The route is wheelchair and stroller accessible. There will be music, refreshments and lots of kids activities – including a visit from Wally the Green Monster.

ANA Massachusetts will have a team walking to support this event. Our Team Captain is Myra Cacace, President Elect and Newsletter Editor.

If you are interested in walking as part of our team, please register using the following link: Team Website: www.FightBlindness.org/goto/ANAMassachusetts

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2014 Annual Fall Symposium Continuing
Nursing Education: Boot Camp

Friday, Nov. 7, 2014
Baystate Health Educational Center
Holyoke, Massachusetts
Symposium Flyer, click here.
Register Now, click here.
space is limited

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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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National nursing shortage fueled by lack of teachers
ABC News
They’re often the first people you see at the doctor’s office, and the first line of defense in any ER – but America’s nursing population is shrinking fast. The nursing shortage may not be caused just by lack of interest. In many ways, it’s caused by lack of capacity.

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Looking to transform healthcare? — Ask a nurse
Forbes
Traditionally, nurses have been the “face of healthcare” to the patient. According to the American Nurses Association (ANA), the nursing profession involves the “protection, promotion, and optimization of health and abilities, prevention of illness and injury, alleviation of suffering, and advocacy in the care of individuals, families, communities, and populations.”

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With the emergence of telemedicine, where do nurses fit in?
By Joan Spitrey
Remote medical monitoring is what most frequently think of in regard to telemedicine. If fact, the use of remote monitoring has been in place for more than 40 years, and has be highly effective in rural areas.

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NURSING & HEALTHCARE NEWS


Limb frailty in children is studied for link to virus
The New York Times
Driven by a handful of reports of poliolike symptoms in children, federal health officials have asked the nation’s physicians to report cases of children with limb weakness or paralysis along with specific spinal-cord abnormalities on a magnetic resonance imaging test. As a respiratory illness known as enterovirus 68 is sickening thousands of children from coast to coast, officials are trying to figure out if the weakness could be linked to the virus.
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Study: Nurse turnover assessments inconsistent
HealthDay News via Healthcare Professionals Network
More than 17 percent of new nurses leave their first job within one year of starting, according to research published online Aug. 25 in Policy, Politics, & Nursing Practice. Christine T. Kovner, Ph.D., RN, from the College of Nursing at New York University in New York City, and colleagues collected data from new nurses as part of the 10-year RN Work Project.
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Evaluating patients for possible Ebola virus disease: Recommendations for healthcare personnel and health officials
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
The purpose of this HAN Advisory is to remind healthcare personnel and health officials to: (1) increase their vigilance in inquiring about a history of travel to West Africa in the 21 days before illness onset for any patient presenting with fever or other symptoms consistent with Ebola; (2) isolate patients who report a travel history to an Ebola-affected country and who are exhibiting Ebola symptoms in a private room with a private bathroom and implement standard, contact, and droplet precautions (gowns, facemask, eye protection and gloves); and (3) immediately notify the local/state health department.
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Barriers to RN Scope of Practice Panel
American Nurses Association
This Professional Issues Panel will identify and clarify barriers to RNs practicing to the full extent of their education, experience, and scope of practice (as set down by the relevant Nurse Practice Act), and guide the development of resources to address these barriers at the institutional, state, and federal level. The Steering Committee will consist of up to fifteen members and will conduct deliberations via virtual meetings beginning in November, 2014.
Applicants must be ANA members. Applications will be accepted through Oct. 10, 2014.

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Head injuries linked to more trouble for teens
CBS News
Teenagers who have experienced a traumatic brain injury are much more likely to engage in a wide range of risky behaviors, Canadian researchers report. Both boys and girls were more likely to smoke, use drugs, drink alcohol and get poor grades after they endured a blow to the head that knocked them out for longer than five minutes or landed them in the hospital for a day or more, the study found.
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Mental health drugs: High risk for adverse events
Healthcare Professionals Network
Prescription medications for mental health diagnoses (e.g. antidepressants, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers) consume approximately 25 percent of commercial health insurers’ pharmacy budgets and almost 35 percent of public payers’ pharmacy spending. In 2011, an estimated 26.8 million U.S. adults — more than 11 percent — took prescription medications for mental illness. A new study in the September 2014 issue of JAMA Psychiatry reports American emergency departments (ED) see patients who take these medications often. What are they seeing? Adverse drug events (ADE).
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Doubling up on blood thinners may be risky
MedPage Today
Patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) seemed to face an increased risk for bleeding when given anti-platelet therapy in addition to a vitamin K antagonist, French researchers reported. Major bleeding events were rare in patients with stable CAD, but were still significantly associated with mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 2.89, 95 percent CI 1.73-4.83, P<0.0001), according to researchers.
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ED visits for drug-related suicide attempts on rise
Psychiatric News
Two new reports from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) suggest that suicide attempts are increasing — particularly among certain age groups — and that a substantial number of these events are associated with prescription and over-the-counter drugs. SAMHSA’s Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN), a public surveillance system that monitors drug-related emergency department (ED) hospital visits, conducted a comparative analysis on the number of visits to an ED for drug-related suicide attempts from 2005 to 2011.
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Intensive glycemic control safely cuts end-stage renal disease
Internal Medicine News
Five years of intensive glycemic control in patients with Type 2 diabetes safely halved long-term rate of end-stage renal disease, compared with placebo, in a multicenter study with about 8,000 patients, a finding that refutes prior suggestions that more intensive glycemic control can harm patients. Intensive glucose control that produced an average hemoglobin A1c of 6.5 percent "is important for preventing serious renal complications and does not cause harm in patients with established Type 2 diabetes," Sophia Zoungas, M.D., said at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.
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Lessons healthcare workers can learn from Ebola crisis in Dallas
Joan Spitrey
As many are aware, the first travel-associated case of Ebola in the United States was confirmed on Sept. 30. The CDC and other key government officials have converged on the Dallas metropolitan area as contacts are identified and educated on signs and symptoms of the disease. As the story unfolded, hospital officials confirmed that the patient had told a hospital nurse of his recent travel from Liberia before being released from the hospital. It appears a few lessons can be learned from this situation. Unfortunately, in healthcare, lessons often come at a cost — human lives.
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Study: Antibiotic use before age 2 might raise obesity risk
HealthDay News
Children who are given broad-spectrum antibiotics before the age of 2 may face a slightly higher risk of becoming obese during childhood, new research suggests. Broad-spectrum antibiotics target a larger number of organisms than narrow-spectrum ones, according to the study. "It is a reason to think about whether you need antibiotics, and which antibiotic you are picking," said lead researcher Charles Bailey, M.D., attending physician at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and an assistant professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Hospital infections with C. difficile level off
HealthLeaders Media
The incidence of the potentially deadly bacterial infection known as Clostridium difficile doubled in hospitals between 2001 and 2010, researchers report, and leveled off between 2008 and 2010. C. difficile is a hospital-acquired infection linked to 14,000 deaths a year. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the main cause is the overuse of antibiotics. Using hospital discharge data on about 2.2 million people, average age 75, the scientists found that about a third had a principal diagnosis of C. difficile infection. Two thirds had other primary diagnoses. Incidence increased to 8.2 per thousand in 2008, the peak year, from 4.5 per thousand in 2001. It then decreased slightly though 2010.
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Study: When EDs close, mortality risks climb at nearby hospitals
By Karen Zabel
Researchers at University of California San Francisco recently released data demonstrating that when an emergency department closes, the effects can be far-reaching. The study examined 16 million emergency admissions in California between 1999 and 2010. According to the results, patients who were admitted to a hospital in an area where an ED had recently closed had a 5 percent higher chance of dying compared to patients admitted to hospitals that were not located near recently closed EDs.
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High blood sugar may worsen spinal cord injury
HealthNewsDigest
Scientists have discovered yet another reason to curb sugar consumption: high levels of it in the blood may make recovery after spinal cord injury harder. Controlling blood sugar levels in patients with spinal cord injury could potentially help doctors prevent additional neurological deterioration. In mice models of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and in a retrospective analysis of human patients, researchers found a link between hyperglycemia and poorer outcomes after spinal cord injury.
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Celiac disease, a common, but elusive, diagnosis
The New York Times
Even in the most sophisticated medical settings, the diagnosis of celiac disease can be missed or the tests done incorrectly. For reasons unknown, celiac disease now affects one in 100 Caucasians. It does occur in other racial groups, but is believed to be much less common. The overwhelming majority of people with celiac disease remain undiagnosed. The most recent data show that only 17 percent of Americans with the disease know they have it. Those who are not avoiding gluten risk developing a host of debilitating, sometimes fatal complications, including cancer.
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ANA Massachusetts Nursing Flash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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