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American nurse with protective gear gets Ebola; how could this happen?
CNN
On the surface, the nurse in Texas seemed to have taken all the precautions needed to protect herself from Ebola. She wore a mask, gown, shield and gloves. Her patient, a man who contracted the virus in Africa, was in isolation at the Dallas hospital where she worked. And yet the woman, whose name has not been released, still contracted Ebola, marking the first known transmission ever in the United States. A nurse in Spain who also treated an Ebola patient also caught the virus.
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ANA MASSACHUSETTS NEWS & UPDATES


Save the Date: ANA Massachusetts Fall Conference — Registration Still Open — Register Today!
Keeping Patients and Nursing Staff Safe: Challenges and Possibilities
Keynote: Janet Haebler, MSN, RN, Associate Director, State Government Affairs, American Nurses Association
Friday, Oct. 17, 2014
PLEASE NOTE: The location of the conference has changed to
The VERVE Crowne Plaza Natick
1360 Worcester Street
Natick, MA 01760
Conference Brochure, click here.
Call for Posters, click here.
Register Now, click here.

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2014 Annual Fall Symposium Continuing
Nursing Education: Boot Camp

Friday, Nov. 7, 2014
Baystate Health Educational Center
Holyoke, Massachusetts
Symposium Flyer, click here.
Register Now, click here.
Don't miss out — space is limited

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ANA Massachusetts Networking Social
Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014
Hampshire House
6-8:30 p.m.
Event Flyer, click here.
Register Now, click here.

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Join Team ANA Massachusetts at the 7th Annual VisionWalk
We are excited to tell you about the 7th Annual Boston VisionWalk. This event will take place Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014 at Artesani Park, 1255 Soldiers Field Road, Brighton, MA 02135 (Registration and Check In is at 12 p.m., Walk Begins at 1 p.m.).

VisionWalk is a fun, family-friendly 5K (3.1 mile) walkathon. The route is wheelchair and stroller accessible. There will be music, refreshments and lots of kids activities – including a visit from Wally the Green Monster.

ANA Massachusetts will have a team walking to support this event. Our Team Captain is Myra Cacace, President Elect and Newsletter Editor.

If you are interested in walking as part of our team, please register using the following link: Team Website: www.FightBlindness.org/goto/ANAMassachusetts

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Public Comment Period open through Oct. 17: Cardiovascular Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, Second Edition
The Cardiovascular Nursing Scope and Standards Revision Workgroup members seek public comments about the draft Cardiovascular Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, Second Edition. The comment period closes on Oct. 17, 2014. Please consider reviewing and providing recommendations for improvements as part of your professional responsibility and accountability. Do invite students, colleagues and other stakeholders to also respond. Access the draft document and response process, here.
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American nurse with protective gear gets Ebola; how could this happen?
CNN
On the surface, the nurse in Texas seemed to have taken all the precautions needed to protect herself from Ebola. She wore a mask, gown, shield and gloves. Her patient, a man who contracted the virus in Africa, was in isolation at the Dallas hospital where she worked.

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National nursing shortage fueled by lack of teachers
ABC News
They’re often the first people you see at the doctor’s office, and the first line of defense in any ER – but America’s nursing population is shrinking fast. The nursing shortage may not be caused just by lack of interest. In many ways, it’s caused by lack of capacity.

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With the emergence of telemedicine, where do nurses fit in?
By Joan Spitrey
Remote medical monitoring is what most frequently think of in regard to telemedicine. If fact, the use of remote monitoring has been in place for more than 40 years, and has be highly effective in rural areas.

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NURSING & HEALTHCARE NEWS


1st Ebola patient diagnosed in US dies in Dallas
The Associated Press via The Boston Globe
The first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States died in a Dallas hospital on Oct. 8, a little more than a week after his diagnosis exposed gaps in the nation's defenses against the disease and set off a scramble to track down anyone exposed to him. Thomas Eric Duncan, 42, was pronounced dead at 7:51 a.m. at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, where he was admitted Sept. 28 and had been kept in isolation, according to spokesman Wendell Watson. Others in Dallas are being monitored as health officials try to contain the virus.
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Nurse management: Open source or old school?
By Keith Carlson
Healthcare is a hierarchical culture, and probably for good reason. That hierarchy creates a structure that allows for appropriate supervision and division of labor, perhaps similar to the command structures of the military. Just like any industry, there are "old school" and "new school" approaches to nurse management. In the 21st century, many managers still cling to old ways of thinking that are, to a great extent, based on top-down, hierarchical corporate structures steeped in 20th-century patriarchal culture. Nursing has a chance to break that pattern.
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CDC will offer more Ebola training to healthcare workers
The New York Times
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that the agency would take new steps to help hospital workers protect themselves, providing more training and urging hospitals to run drills to practice dealing with potential Ebola patients. In response to the news that a healthcare worker in Dallas had contracted Ebola, a spokeswoman said the agency would also issue more specific instructions and explanations for putting on and removing protective equipment and would urge nurses and doctors to enlist a co-worker or “buddy” to watch them do so.
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It's time to fight sepsis like we fight heart attack, researchers say
Medical Xpress
A decade ago, America's healthcare community took on heart attacks with gusto, harnessing the power of research and data to make sure that every patient got the best possible care. It worked: Death rates for heart attack have dropped. The same has happened with heart failure and pneumonia. Now, say a pair of University of Michigan Medical School experts, it's time to do the same for sepsis.
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CDC: Half of US hospital patients taking antibiotics; 25 percent on 2 or more
Healthline
A new study by researchers with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows just how often some hospital patients are given multiple antibiotics. According to the study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, half of all hospitalized patients receive at least one antimicrobial drug on a given day, most for treating a variety of infections. Half of those patients receive more than one antimicrobial drug, and more than 5 percent take four or more antimicrobial drugs. The most surprising finding was that of the 83 different antimicrobial drugs used, just four accounted for 45 percent of the treatments.
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Mini-stroke might lead to post-traumatic stress disorder
Nurse.com
A mini-stroke, or transient ischemic attack, might increase a person’s risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder, according to new research. TIA, like stroke, is caused by restricted blood supply to the brain; however, TIA is temporary and often lasts less than five minutes, without causing permanent brain damage.
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Study: Common childhood vaccine cuts 'superbug' infection
HealthDay News
The childhood pneumococcal vaccine helps children avoid the suffering and danger of ear infections, meningitis and pneumonia. And a new study suggests it may provide an added bonus: cutting down on infections from antibiotic-resistant "superbugs." First used in children in 2010, the pneumococcal vaccine was linked to a 62 percent reduction between 2009 and 2013 of drug-resistant infections of bacterial pneumonia, meningitis and bloodstream infections for children under 5.
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Women have greater atheroma regression with statins
HealthDay News
For patients with coronary atheroma, high-intensity statin treatment is associated with greater regression in women than men, according to a study published online in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging. Researchers examined sex-related differences in coronary atheroma regression after high-intensity statin treatment. Participants (765 men and 274 women) were treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg for 24 months.
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Brain aneurysm treatment: Too much practice variation
MedPage Today
The rate of open versus catheter-based treatment for cerebral aneurysms varies hugely across the country, according to a report suggesting unwarranted practice variation. The rates of endovascular coiling for unruptured aneurysms among Medicare beneficiaries ranged from a low of 35.0 percent in Modesto, California, to a high of 98.6 percent in Tacoma, Washington, researchers found. For ruptured aneurysms, similar variation in the rate of coiling was seen — ranging from 36.3 percent in Atlanta to 98.8 percent in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
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Tablets could ease healthcare workflows
Tech Page One
As healthcare professionals work in a hospital, they need a device that allows them to collect vital data on patients while also viewing X-rays and electronic health records (EHRs). Workplaces like hospitals are become more mobile, and the portability of tablets provides an opportunity to replace PCs while maintaining the full functionality of Windows applications. Tablets offer clinicians the flexibility to switch among complex lab analysis tools, physician education apps, EHRs and secure messaging apps all in a single session on one device.
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Study: HIV's infection tactics could guide AIDS vaccine
Chicago Tribune
New research that sheds light on the methods and machinery used by HIV to infect cells provides insight into the tricky virus that potentially could guide the development of a vaccine against the virus that causes AIDS, according to U.S. government and other scientists. Separate studies describe in detail the structure and dynamics of the spike on the surface of the human immunodeficiency virus that it employs to fuse with and enter cells. The researchers expressed hope that the information can provide a road map for a potential vaccine designed to keep the spike in a "closed" state to prevent the virus from successfully infecting cells.
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An ingestible pill with needles could be the new form of injection
Medical News Today
Imagine swallowing a pill with tiny needles instead of getting an injection. Then again, just imagine swallowing a pill with tiny needles. It may sound painful, but according to the researchers who developed the novel capsule — which could replace painful injections — there are no harmful side effects. The researchers, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Massachusetts General Hospital, have published the results of a study that tested the microneedle pill in the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of pigs.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    National nursing shortage fueled by lack of teachers (ABC News)
Study: Nurse turnover assessments inconsistent (HealthDay News via Healthcare Professionals Network)
Study: Antibiotic use before age 2 might raise obesity risk (HealthDay News)
Limb frailty in children is studied for link to virus (The New York Times)
Mental health drugs: High risk for adverse events (Healthcare Professionals Network)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

ANA Massachusetts Nursing Flash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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