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Nurses to administrators: We're not happy about EHRs
By Scott E. Rupp
Nurses are not happy about having to use electronic health records, a new report suggests. According to the Q3 2014 Black Book EHR Loyalty survey, 92 percent of nursing staff are dissatisfied with the systems — an all-time high. Nurses in 84 percent of U.S. hospitals also state they are struggling with flawed EHR systems, and as many as 88 percent blame financial administrators and CIOs for selecting low-performance systems because of low prices, the need to chase federal incentives and cutting corners at the expense of quality of care.
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ANA MASSACHUSETTS NEWS & UPDATES


ANA Massachusetts Networking Social
Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014
Hampshire House
6-8:30 p.m.
Registration fees: $15 students, $35 ANA MA members, $40 non-members
There will be complimentary hors d'oeuvres, beer, wine and soda.
Register Now, click here.

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LAST CHANCE: 2014 Annual Fall Symposium Continuing Nursing Education: Boot Camp
Friday, Nov. 7, 2014
Baystate Health Educational Center
Holyoke, Massachusetts

Target Audience: This is intended for nurse planners who are new to the planning role or wish to expand their knowledge of the planning process.
Symposium Flyer, click here.
Register Now, click here.
Don't miss out — space is limited

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Call for Nominations ANA Massachusetts Awards
Deadline Nov. 15
AN OPPORTUNITY TO HONOR YOUR COLLEAGUES
American Nurses Association Massachusetts Awards open to All Nurses

ANA Massachusetts Awards honor the remarkable, but often unrecognized work of Massachusetts members. You probably work with or know nurse colleagues whose commitment to nursing and to patient care is exemplary. Yet in the rush of today's world, there is often little time to acknowledge them and their professional contributions.

You work with or know nurse colleagues whose commitment to nursing and to patient care is exemplary. Yet in the rush of today's world, there is often little time to acknowledge them and their professional contributions. ANA Massachusetts Awards provide you the opportunity to honor their remarkable, but often unrecognized practice.

ANA Massachusetts Awards are not restricted to ANA Massachusetts members. Nominees can be a member of ANA Massachusetts or a non ANA Massachusetts member who is nominated by a member of ANA Massachusetts. These awards can be peer or self nominated. ANA Massachusetts has established several awards that provide you the opportunity to recognize those nurses who have made a difference at the bedside, in the classroom, and in the practice of nursing.
More Information and to access applications, click here.

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Nurses to administrators: We're not happy about EHRs
By Scott E. Rupp
Nurses are not happy about having to use electronic health records, a new report suggests. According to the Q3 2014 Black Book EHR Loyalty survey, 92 percent of nursing staff are dissatisfied with the systems — an all-time high.

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National nursing shortage fueled by lack of teachers
ABC News
They’re often the first people you see at the doctor’s office, and the first line of defense in any ER – but America’s nursing population is shrinking fast. The nursing shortage may not be caused just by lack of interest. In many ways, it’s caused by lack of capacity.

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With the emergence of telemedicine, where do nurses fit in?
By Joan Spitrey
Remote medical monitoring is what most frequently think of in regard to telemedicine. If fact, the use of remote monitoring has been in place for more than 40 years, and has be highly effective in rural areas.

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NURSING & HEALTHCARE NEWS


The nurse speaks: Making our voices heard
By Keith Carlson
When there's a major public health crisis, doctors are generally the experts sought out to provide commentary on television, radio and other venues of mainstream media. This is how it has always been, and it will continue to be this way without a major shift in nurses' self-awareness and media-savvy assertiveness. If nurses are the most trusted profession — as evidenced by the annual Gallup poll that asks Americans who they trust and who they feel is most honest — why aren't nurses regularly utilized as sources of commentary when the proverbial feces hits the fan?
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Flu season here; health officials urge vaccine
Chicago Tribune
Flu season has officially begun, and though the risk of catching the disease is low this early in the season, health officials emphasize that everyone 6 months and older should get a flu shot as soon as possible. "Now is a great time to get vaccinated because we don't know when the flu season will hit" in earnest, said Julie Morita, chief medical officer for the Chicago Department of Public Health. Although there has been a slight delay in the distribution of the vaccine, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is enough vaccine to go around. Manufacturers anticipate that most of their flu vaccine will be distributed by the end of October.
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Different routes of central venous catheterization and their relative risks
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Central venous catheterization or central line placement is a technique where a tube is inserted beneath the patient's skin in order to create a simple, pain-free way of providing medications and nutrients to the patient. Central venous access catheters have been widely used in hospital settings, and more than 3.4 million of them are placed for patients per year. Some of the benefits of this technique as compared to peripheral access include: greater longevity without infection, avoidance of phlebitis, line security and a potential route for nutritional support as well as fluid administration.
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Could enteroviruses be behind rising rates of Type 1 diabetes?
Healthline
The current outbreak of enterovirus D68 has called attention to the wide range of problems viral infections can cause. In adults, the virus tends to have no effect at all. In children, it generally causes a cold-like illness, but sometimes triggers a severe respiratory infection or even partial paralysis. Researchers also suspect that enterovirus infections may raise a child’s risk of Type 1 diabetes.
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Healthcare media hype: Have you jumped on the bandwagon?
By Jessica Taylor
Mass media is a substantial power in modern culture, especially in America. We live in a mediated culture — where news both reflects and creates the culture. Our society is continuously bombarded with messages from a multitude of sources promoting not only products, but moods, attitudes and a sense of what is and isn't important in the world. So, is the media really honing in on what you want? Or are you jumping on the media-hype bandwagon? Let's take the most recent news stories of Ebola, for example.
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The link between weight loss surgery and headaches
TIME
Weight loss surgery may be a risk factor for a specific kind of headache, according to a new study published in the journal Neurology. Researchers looked at 338 patients with a history of spontaneous intracranial hypotension — headaches typically caused by a cerebrospinal fluid leak — and found that 11 of those patients had undergone a form of bariatric surgery. Though 11 people, 3.3 percent of the sample, is a seemingly small number and certainly not enough to change clinical practice, it was still significant enough for the researchers to warn physicians of the possible relationship.
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Hospitals struggle to beat back serious infections
NPR
While Ebola stokes public anxiety, more than 1 in 6 hospitals — including some top medical centers — are having trouble stamping out less exotic but sometimes deadly infections, federal records show. Nationally, about 1 in 25 hospitalized patients gets an infection. Some 75,000 people die each year from them — more than from car crashes and gunshots combined. A Kaiser Health News analysis found 695 hospitals with higher than expected rates for at least one of the six types of infections tracked by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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Easing the pain of sickle cell disease
The New York Times
They often turn up in the emergency room in severe pain, pleading for relief. A drug that can help reduce their flare-ups is readily available — yet too rarely used. The patients, many of them children, have sickle cell disease, a debilitating and sometimes life-threatening blood disorder. It is relatively rare, so physicians may not know how to treat it. For patients, the results are devastating, including severe pain that often requires hospitalization and can last for days. A new set of guidelines for managing the disease, published recently in JAMA, aims to change that.
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10 ways to apply social tools for an improved patient experience
By Christina Thielst
The pressures and drivers to reduce costs, improve quality, emphasize prevention and increase access are making social media and the underlying technologies more attractive to healthcare leaders. They can be effective and efficient tools for the delivery of communications to targeted individuals and/or populations. As a result, those leaders who recognize that we must change the way care is provided are starting to explore new ways of engaging patients across the continuum of care.
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High drug prices could increase industry innovation
Forbes
Peter B. Bach, M.D., is a physician at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the director of its Center for Health Policy and Outcomes. Bach is a passionate advocate for patients and often eloquently expresses concerns on the high prices of drugs, particularly new cancer therapies. When he speaks, many people pay close attention. However, his guest post on Forbes.com entitled “Could High Drug Prices Be Bad For Innovation” unfortunately is off-base.
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Nurses face obstacles on front lines against Ebola
USA Today
In the fight against Ebola, nurses are on the front lines, risking their own health to care for others. Now they want hospitals to have their backs. With two U.S. nurses already stricken, several nursing groups and safety advocates argue that the risk at hospitals across the USA is higher than necessary because of widespread problems with preparedness training, infection control gear, workplace culture and nurse staffing levels.
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Skin patch could replace the syringe for disease diagnosis
Medical News Today
Drawing blood and testing it is standard practice for many medical diagnostics. As a less painful alternative, scientists are developing skin patches that could one day replace the syringe. In the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry, one team reports they have designed and successfully tested, for the first time, a small skin patch that detected malaria proteins in live mice. It could someday be adapted for use in humans to diagnose other diseases, too. Researchers note that while blood is rich with molecular clues that tell a story about a person's health, withdrawing it is often painful. It also requires trained personnel and expensive lab equipment and facilities for analysis.
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High-intensity statins cut diabetic atherosclerosis
HealthDay News
High-intensity statin therapy can alter the progressive nature of diabetic atherosclerosis, according to a study published in Diabetes Care. Brian Stegman, M.D., from the Cleveland Clinic, and colleagues compared changes in biochemistry and coronary percent atheroma volume (PAV) in 159 patients with and 880 without diabetes. Coronary atheroma volume was measured using serial intravascular ultrasound in patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg for 24 months. The researchers found that at baseline, patients with diabetes had lower LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels but higher triglyceride and C-reactive protein levels than patients without diabetes.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    A joint statement: Ebola demands a collaborative response (AHA, AMA and ANA)
Study: Older antibiotic still works against staph infections (HealthDay News)
Why are nurses getting infected with Ebola? We were not prepared (By Joan Spitrey)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

ANA Massachusetts Nursing Flash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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