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Ditching your stethoscope for your smartphone?
The Dallas Morning News
Speaking at the American Academy of Family Practice Assembly this month, Eric Topal, M.D., suggested many of our routine medical practice devices could quickly become "relics" as we all advance our technological services. As a cardiologist, Topal uses his smart phone for just about everything. He ditched his stethoscope and stopped taking patient's pulses. Instead, he is able to get more information from his smartphone. He demonstrated the technologically advanced use of his smart phone as an echocardiogram; in addition, he demonstrated use of the phone as a glucose monitor, blood pressure and heart rate tracker. Topal also suggests smartphone technology translates to less costs.
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ANA MASSACHUSETTS NEWS & UPDATES


LAST CHANCE: 2014 Annual Fall Symposium Continuing Nursing Education: Boot Camp
Friday, Nov. 7, 2014
Baystate Health Educational Center
Holyoke, Massachusetts

Target Audience: This is intended for nurse planners who are new to the planning role or wish to expand their knowledge of the planning process.
Symposium Flyer, click here.
Register Now, click here.

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Call for Nominations ANA Massachusetts Awards
Deadline Nov. 15
AN OPPORTUNITY TO HONOR YOUR COLLEAGUES
American Nurses Association Massachusetts Awards open to All Nurses

ANA Massachusetts Awards honor the remarkable, but often unrecognized work of Massachusetts members. You probably work with or know nurse colleagues whose commitment to nursing and to patient care is exemplary. Yet in the rush of today's world, there is often little time to acknowledge them and their professional contributions.

You work with or know nurse colleagues whose commitment to nursing and to patient care is exemplary. Yet in the rush of today's world, there is often little time to acknowledge them and their professional contributions. ANA Massachusetts Awards provide you the opportunity to honor their remarkable, but often unrecognized practice.

ANA Massachusetts Awards are not restricted to ANA Massachusetts members. Nominees can be a member of ANA Massachusetts or a non ANA Massachusetts member who is nominated by a member of ANA Massachusetts. These awards can be peer or self nominated. ANA Massachusetts has established several awards that provide you the opportunity to recognize those nurses who have made a difference at the bedside, in the classroom, and in the practice of nursing.
More Information and to access applications, click here.

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Regulations regarding Hydrocodone-Only Extended Release Medications that are not in an Abuse Deterrent Form
The Board of Registration in Nursing, at its Aug. 13, 2014 meeting, adopted regulations regarding hydrocodone-only extended release medications that are not in an abuse deterrent form. The language is consistent with corresponding regulations applicable to physicians, dentists, podiatrists, physician assistants and pharmacists. The revision at 244 CMR 4.07(3), promulgated Aug. 29, 2014 documents the following ... more information, click here.
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Free Coping with Stress & Depression Webinar on Nov. 20
Families for Depression Awareness, a national nonprofit organization, is hosting a free, 1-hour Coping with Stress and Depression webinar on Thursday, Nov. 20 at 7:00 p.m. ET / 4:00 p.m. PT. Designed for adults, family caregivers, human resources managers, and employee assistance program professionals, the webinar covers practical ways to reduce stress; mindfulness-based stress reduction; how to recognize signs of depression; what to do if you or someone you know is suffering from depression; what resources are available to you and your family. People who attend the webinar and complete the online evaluation form will receive a free Coping with Stress brochure. Register for this free Coping with Stress and Depression webinar at www.familyaware.org/trainings. (Busy at that time? Don't worry! After the webinar, all people who have registered will receive a link to the recorded presentation, so they can listen at their convenience.) Families for Depression Awareness is online at www.familyaware.org.
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Ditching your stethoscope for your smartphone?
The Dallas Morning News
Speaking at the American Academy of Family Practice Assembly this month, Eric Topal, M.D., suggested many of our routine medical practice devices could quickly become "relics" as we all advance our technological services. As a cardiologist, Topal uses his smart phone for just about everything.

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Nurses to administrators: We're not happy about EHRs
By Scott E. Rupp
Nurses are not happy about having to use electronic health records, a new report suggests. According to the Q3 2014 Black Book EHR Loyalty survey, 92 percent of nursing staff are dissatisfied with the systems — an all-time high.

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National nursing shortage fueled by lack of teachers
ABC News
They’re often the first people you see at the doctor’s office, and the first line of defense in any ER – but America’s nursing population is shrinking fast. The nursing shortage may not be caused just by lack of interest. In many ways, it’s caused by lack of capacity.

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NURSING & HEALTHCARE NEWS


To quarantine or not? A question of trust
By Joan Spitrey
As the debate rages on regarding quarantines ordered by state governors, Kaci Hickox — the nurse who was ordered home quarantine — refuses to comply. So the national conversation continues. As a nurse, Hickox needs to set an example. It appears she wants to make a point that she is not infectious, but her message is not being heard through its delivery of selfishness. Although all do not agree upon the current course of action, there are a few things we all agree on.
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Almost 1 in 5 Americans plagued by constant pain
HealthDay News
Almost one-fifth of Americans do daily battle with crippling, chronic pain, a large new survey reveals, with the elderly and women struggling the most. The poll of roughly 35,000 American households provides the first snapshot of the pain landscape in the United States, the survey authors said. The bottom line: Significant and debilitating pain that endures for three months or more is now a common feature in the lives of an estimated 39 million Americans.
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Experts update stroke prevention guidelines
Reuters
Tools for preventing strokes include a healthy diet, home blood pressure monitoring and an online stroke-risk estimator, according to updated guidelines issued Oct. 29 by a leading heart health organization. Together with traditional measures like smoking cessation aids, medications and surgeries, the updated recommendations can help people substantially reduce the risk of stroke, said James Meschia, M.D., who led the group that wrote the new guidelines for the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.
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Ibuprofen good as morphine, and safer, for kids with fractures
Reuters
The narcotic drug morphine is not the best choice for pain relief in kids with broken bones, a new study suggests. Kids in the study took either morphine or ibuprofen by mouth. The morphine was associated with side effects like drowsiness, nausea and vomiting — but it wasn't any better than ibuprofen at relieving pain. "Both ibuprofen and oral morphine provided pain relief but there were no significant differences between the two agents," said lead author Naveen Poonai, M.D., a pediatric emergency physician at the London Health Sciences Centre in Ontario.
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AAP issues guidelines for children's bronchiolitis treatment
Family Practice News
The main treatment for bronchiolitis in young children should be support and observation, according to new clinical practice guidelines for diagnosing, managing and preventing bronchiolitis. The guidelines apply to children aged 1-23 months and emphasize clinical diagnosis and no medications except nebulized hypertonic saline for infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis, wrote Shawn L. Ralston, M.D., Allan S. Lieberthal, M.D., and their associates. These guidelines update and replace the ones issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2006.
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People with celiac disease more likely to fracture bones
Reuters
People diagnosed with celiac disease are almost twice as likely as those without it to break a bone, according to a new review of the evidence. More studies are needed, though, to see if people whose celiac hasn't been diagnosed yet are at similar risk, researchers say. About two million Americans have celiac disease — in which the immune system attacks the small intestine in response to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley — according to the National Institutes of Health.
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Hospital preparedness: Pay now or pay later?
By Christina Thielst
Recent events surrounding the diagnosis of Ebola on U.S. soil have proven that we can't always predict when and where an infectious disease will present. Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas wasn't really prepared for a person who would test positive for Ebola to walk into their emergency room, nor were they prepared to support their staff during his treatment after admission. It seems there were several weaknesses in planning and preparation that resulted in missed opportunities to minimize the risk of their staff becoming infected with the disease.
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1st vaccine approved by FDA to prevent serogroup B Meningococcal disease
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
On. Oct. 29, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the approval of Trumenba, the first vaccine licensed in the United States to prevent invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B in individuals 10 through 25 years of age. Vaccination is the most effective way to prevent meningococcal disease. Before Trumenba's approval, meningococcal vaccines approved for use in the United States have only covered four of the five main serogroups of N. meningitidis bacteria that cause meningococcal disease: A, C, Y, and W.
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Regenerative cells: Hope for people disabled by spinal cord injury
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Stem cells have several unique properties that separate them from other cells. They can replenish themselves for long periods of time by dividing, and they are unspecialized cells that can differentiate into specialized cells such as nerve or heart cells. Spinal cord injury is one such target of regenerative cell therapy. SCI is an important contributing factor to morbidity and mortality across the world. But researchers are optimistic with the recent case with Darek Fidyka, whose recovery from paralysis may just open the door to a treatment of SCI that will get people out of wheelchairs.
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Telemedicine eczema care just as effective as office visits
Reuters
After a year of emailing photos of their skin and communicating with their dermatologists online, eczema patients showed just as much improvement as people who saw their own physicians in person, according to a new study. There are not enough dermatologists in the United States to meet the demand for services, researchers write in JAMA Dermatology. Teledermatology, or the remote delivery of dermatology services using telecommunications technology, could help ease that demand, they say.
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CDC issues new Ebola guidance for ED workers
FierceHealthcare
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Oct. 27 revised its recommendations to help clinicians evaluate and manage patients with possible Ebola who arrive in hospital emergency rooms for treatment. The new guidelines reflect the lessons learned from the recent experiences of U.S. hospitals caring for Ebola patients, according to the CDC. The risk of an Ebola patient with early, limited symptoms transmitting the deadly virus to a healthcare worker in the ER is lower than a patient hospitalized with more severe symptoms. However, emergency departments must know how to assess patients for the possibility they have the illness and follow best practices, including proper use of personal protective equipment.
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Traumatic brain injury in older adults linked to increased dementia risk
Medical News Today
A new study published in JAMA Neurology suggests that for adults aged 55 years and older, traumatic brain injury may be linked to an increased risk of dementia. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 60 percent of all hospitalizations for TBI occur among individuals aged 55 and older. The highest rates of TBI-related emergency department visits, inpatient stays and deaths occur among individuals aged 75 years and older. Researchers say such figures emphasize the need to gain a better understanding of the relationship between TBI and dementia.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Nurses to administrators: We're not happy about EHRs (By Scott E. Rupp)
National nursing shortage fueled by lack of teachers (ABC News)
Hospitals struggle to beat back serious infections (NPR)
High drug prices could increase industry innovation (Forbes)
Easing the pain of sickle cell disease (The New York Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

ANA Massachusetts Nursing Flash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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