This Week in Perio
Feb. 19, 2014

First evidence-based diagnostic criteria for TMD developed by dental researchers
DentistryIQ
In the past, diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders, which affect an estimated 10 to 15 percent of Americans, have been based on a consensus of expert opinions and often reflect a shared clinical perspective. None had been rigorously tested by scientists.More

Passive smoking may affect dental development in children
Dental Tribune
According to a study conducted by researchers in Turkey, young children exposed to second-hand smoke experience slower dental development compared with children who are not exposed to passive smoking. In the study, 90 children with a mean age of 5.5 years who had been exposed to passive smoking and 90 healthy age-matched controls were investigated for their salivary cotinine level, a biomarker for exposure to tobacco smoke, and dental development status using panoramic radiographs at Ondokuz Mayıs University in Turkey.More

Gum disease: You and your dentist/dental hygienist can work as a team to prevent it
WebMD via Tri-County Times
You aren't alone when it comes to taking care of your teeth and preventing gum disease. At-home oral hygiene with twice-daily brushing and daily flossing will help keep gum disease at bay, while regular, clinical exams and cleanings by your dental healthcare professional will diagnose and treat any evidence of the disease.More

Dental health during pregnancy: How to care for your teeth and gums
Fox News
You've cut down on coffee, nixed sushi, and exercise most days, but what you may not realize is that oral health is just as important when you're pregnant. Dental problems during pregnancy are quite common, with approximately 40 percent of women who have gingivitis, cavities and periodontitis, according to a recent report by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. And left untreated, many conditions can be harmful to you and your baby. Here, find out why dental problems are more common during pregnancy, if you're at risk, and what you can do about it.More

Six superpower foods for healthy teeth and gums
Care2
We all know that oral care is important, and holistic oral care goes way beyond brushing and flossing. With alternative therapies such as oil pulling, and homemade solutions such as herbal mouthwash, there's a lot you can do to ensure your smile stays beautiful and bright. But don't overlook the powerful purification properties of simple, everyday foods. The following six are supercharged oral crime fighters, certain to keep your gums safe and pearly whites pretty.More

13 awful things that happen if you don't brush and floss your teeth
Business Insider
Can't ever find the time to take care of your teeth? About half of Americans don't floss daily, and one in five don't brush twice daily — so you're not alone. But you may want to reconsider. "Taking care of your teeth and gums isn't just about preventing cavities or bad breath," the American Dental Association warns. "The mouth is a gateway into your body's overall health."More

University of Buffalo dean chairs symposium on oral and systemic health
UB Reporter
Dr. Michael Glick, dean of the School of Dental Medicine, has organized and acted as program chair of "The First International Quintessence Symposium on Oral Health: The Oral-Systemic Connection," Feb. 7-8 in San Diego. Glick, editor of The Journal of the American Dental Association, is known for his innovative, medicine-oriented approach to dental care that encourages dental students to think of themselves as health care professionals first and dentists second.More

The hidden costs of comfort
Dental Economics
Habits allow us to enter into a comfort zone where we're not as engaged with the task at hand, where we can accomplish something with little conscious attention or deliberate effort. Of course, some habits are bad for us. Smoking cigarettes, indulging in desserts or unhealthy foods, etc., all provide temporary comfort but at a long-term cost to our health. This is where film radiography comes in.More

First evidence-based diagnostic criteria for TMD developed by dental researchers
DentistryIQ
In the past, diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders, which affect an estimated 10 to 15 percent of Americans, have been based on a consensus of expert opinions and often reflect a shared clinical perspective. None had been rigorously tested by scientists.More

Dental implant assessment
RDH
Consider this scenario: Your dental hygiene patient enters the treatment operatory for a routine visit. She mentions that she has noticed bleeding from the area around her implant at the maxillary left lateral site. You take a periapical radiograph of the area. Upon probing, you note a 9 millimeter pocket.More

Periodontist personally experiences gum disease, cardiovascular health link
The Spokesman-Review
Studies have linked gum disease to cardiovascular disease, putting people at higher risk of diabetes, heart attack and stroke. Periodontist Lauralee Nygaard learned that the hard way.More

Dental practice turnarounds begin with a business analysis
DentistryIQ
Most dentists now understand that the new, more challenging economy is here to stay. They also realize that, more than ever, the future of their practice is in their own hands. The question is how to initiate their individual recovery.More

Three things your dental practice can learn from Starbucks
Dental Practice Management
What does Starbucks have that That Place Next Door doesn't have? Why are people drawn to one place, even if it means that they have to stand in line and wait to be served? And, finally, what can a dental office learn from the Starbucks model to get loyal patients who are willing to go to any length for their service?More