This Week in Perio
Jul. 9, 2014

Periodontal therapy may improve heart health in high-risk populations
Dental Tribune
The findings of a new study indicate that, in addition to treating periodontal disease, periodontal therapy could have a considerable systemic impact. Researchers have found that a single session of nonsurgical treatment for periodontal disease significantly reduced the thickness of artery walls, a risk factor for heart disease, in patients.More

Stem cells may be used to grow teeth
Dentistry Today
Stem cells may be closer to being implemented. Stem cells would likely be a more effective way to replace missing teeth because of the costs of implants, in addition to the difficulty in making sure the implants last for a long period of time.More

New study: Intraoral scanners accelerate work flow
Dental Tribune
Digital technology is increasingly determining work in everyday dental practice. Intraoral scanners, for example, provide new treatment options for the patient and are expected to accelerate the prosthetic work flow. However, little is known about the actual time required to make digital impressions. Now, a new study has confirmed that computer-aided impression making is more time efficient than conventional methods.More

Bad teeth? Blame your genes
CNN
Remember "The Big Book of British Smiles" from "The Simpsons"? The dentist used it to scare children into proper dental hygiene. And let's be honest, it was funny! Because though British tea and good manners have an excellent international reputation, British teeth are mostly used as a punch line. But tooth decay is far from only a British problem — in fact, it's one of the most common chronic disease worldwide.More

The link between oral and overall health
Le Sueur News-Herald
Here's a great sound bite for you: The health of your mouth may mirror your overall health. What's the link? For one, good dental care helps prevent a buildup of bacteria and inflammation from gum disease. And that may help protect other parts of your body. Researchers need to conduct more studies to confirm the possible links, but evidence is growing.More

Restoration of a damaged dental implant due to removal of a fractured screw: Thinking outside the box
Surgical Restorative
Dental implant success has been well documented in the literature; however, failure does occur. Typically, failure can be categorized as either early or late. Early failure occurs prior to the implant integrating, with causes such as overheating during osteotomy preparation, overpreparation of the osteotomy, implant contamination during surgery, poor bone quality, lack of primary stability and macro/micro motion.More

Report highlights promising models that expand dental care
Statesman Journal
A report studying the effectiveness of three strategies that were used to expand dental healthcare makes the case that using mid-level oral health practitioners could be an economical path to making dentistry accessible to more people. As Oregon tries to figure out its own solutions for the dental care shortage, case studies from other states are showing what's possible.More

Periodontal therapy may improve heart health in high-risk populations
Dental Tribune
The findings of a new study indicate that, in addition to treating periodontal disease, periodontal therapy could have a considerable systemic impact. Researchers have found that a single session of nonsurgical treatment for periodontal disease significantly reduced the thickness of artery walls, a risk factor for heart disease, in patients.More

Dr. Anthony Youn: You don't want a jack-of-all-trades surgeon
CNN
I once worked with a plastic surgeon, let's call him Dr. Saul, who performed cleft lip and palate repairs, face-lifts, breast reconstruction after mastectomy, and even complex repairs of tendons in the hands and fingers. His practice wasn't very busy, so he performed some of these procedures only once every few months. While the breadth of Saul's practice was impressive, I couldn't get over the question: How many different types of procedures can you trust one doctor to perform?More

Non-surgical gum disease treatment reduces thickness of wall of arteries
The Medical News
A simple non-surgical gum disease treatment markedly reduces the thickness of the wall of the arteries, a risk factor for heart disease, according to a first of its kind study among Aboriginal Australians. The study findings may be of particular importance to Aboriginal Australians, who in general have poorer oral health and higher rates of cardiovascular disease.More

Do's and don'ts for internal marketing: Let patients help you grow
DrBicuspid.com
Word-of-mouth advertising is an established, effective way to grow a practice. If you're not getting a substantial number of new patient referrals from your existing patients, implement new internal marketing strategies to take advantage of this untapped growth potential, according to Dr. Roger P. Levin. (May require free registration to view article.)More

Four ways to improve communication with specialty dental practices
DentistryIQ
When restorative doctors and specialists collaborate on a case, success can be measured in terms of four factors.More