AASPA Newsline
Jul. 28, 2015

2015 AASPA CME Meeting & Surgical Update

We hope you will join us Oct. 1 – 4, 2015 at the Hilton Suites Chicago/Magnificent Mile, Chicago, Illinois, for our 15th Annual AASPA CME Meeting.

Join fellow surgical PAs, PA educators, PA students, pre-PA students and surgical industry leaders at the 15th Annual Surgical CME, preceding the Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons!

This exciting, hands-on surgical meeting will be held at the fabulous Hilton Suites Chicago in the heart of incredible Chicago.

If you are looking for a qualified surgical PA, this is the ideal venue to fill that position. For industry exhibitors looking for "high touch face time" with surgical PAs, this is the ideal meeting for you! More

Register now for the 2015 FCCS — Fundamental Critical Care Support

Management principles for the first 24 hours of critical care. Two-day course — 16 hours of CME and Certificate of Completion and card.

Course will be held before the 15th Annual AASPA CME Meeting at the Hilton Suites Chicago/Magnificent Mile.

Register today! More

Cosmetic surgery leads to possible pain relief from migraines
Medical Xpress
Bryan Kirsch knew something was wrong when the stairs moved. After roughhousing with his children in 2011, he was walking upstairs with one when, he remembered, "I look up the stairs, and the whole world is spinning." Thus began three years of near-constant pain from migraines. Kirsch is one of the first people in Chicago to undergo a surgery aiming to alleviate chronic migraine pain. Now, Kirsch says, he is essentially free of pain.More

Do cell phones spread infections in hospitals?
Healthline News
Nurses and doctors might show a patient some lab results on an iPad, then touch the device later in the day without washing it first. They might also touch their phone before or after washing their hands between patients. Hospital visitors can also contribute to the problem. More

Surgeons remain flexible in treating variety of complex auricular deformities
Healio
Prominent ears typically have larger conchomastoid angles: Normal values are approximately 25 degrees in males and 20 degrees in females. The researchers explained that age is a critical factor in evaluating and surgical decision-making. Normal auricles reach approximately 90 percent of adult size by 3 years of age.More

Limited role for continuous analgesic pumps in lap sleeve gastrectomy
Anesthesiology News
In patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, a continuous infusion of local anesthetic via an anterior abdominal wall catheter does not improve pain control and does not reduce the use of narcotics or antiemetics, or decrease the hospital length of stay (LOS). “Our study does not support the increased cost of using the continuous infusion [analgesic] catheters,” said Elaine Cleveland, M.D., a general surgeon at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, in El Paso, Texas. She presented results from this randomized, double-blind, controlled trial at Obesity Week 2014.More

First, do no harm: When healthcare practitioners work while sick
By Dorothy L. Tengler
"Go to school. You'll be fine," or "If I miss work, I'll be fired." These are common misconceptions most of us have learned throughout life. Why is it so difficult for us to stay home when ill? The reasons are different for each of us. For the general public, one reason is more than 40 million American workers get no paid sick leave. They have to work when ill or take unpaid sick days, which can lead to financial hardship, or even dismissal.More

Glued intrascleral posterior chamber IOL fixation technique continues to evolve
Healio
In the last decade, surgeons began to perform posterior chamber IOL implantation using an intrascleral haptic fixation technique, with or without sutures. Experts say the technique and its variants enhance the long-term stability of posterior chamber IOLs. Sutureless intrascleral haptic fixation of a three-piece posterior chamber IOL in eyes with no capsular support was reported by Scharioth and colleagues in 2007. The original sutureless technique involved tucking the IOL haptics into scleral tunnels parallel to the limbus, with no suturing or gluing.More

Doctors, smartphones and the OR — do they really go together?
mHealthNews
Next time you’re on the operating table and you have one last look around as the anesthesiologist approaches, don’t be too sure that that person in scrubs looking at a smartphone is pulling up vital health data. He or she might be texting a friend, or ordering a new carpet. Cellphone use is not generally restricted in the operating room, but some experts say the time for rules has come. In interviews, many described co-workers’ texting friends and relatives from the surgical suite. Some spoke of colleagues who hide a phone in a drawer and check it when they think no one is watching.More

New orthobiologics products can benefit both patients and surgeons
News-Medical
Autografts, the gold standard of bone grafts, have several limitations. As a result, new orthobiologics products are being developed for the benefit of patients as well as surgeons. Innovations in biomaterials and graft design have enabled these advanced products that mimic the natural human bone and speed up bone repair and regeneration.More

Surgical teams reduce urinary tract infection rate by focusing on catheter use in the OR
Medical Xpress
Surgical teams at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, are decreasing the rate of urinary tract infection (UTI) in their institution by paying scrupulous attention to the use of catheters before and immediately after operations. Their efforts are believed to be among the first reported in the country to target UTI prevention in the operating room (OR) by decreasing catheter utilization, according to a study presented today at the 2015 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) Conference. More