Foot & Ankle Weekly
Aug. 10, 2010

There is still time to register for ACFAOM 2010, Aug. 26-29, at Disney World
ACFAOM
The 2010 ACFAOM Annual Clinical Conference is less than three weeks away. This conference features a cutting-edge clinically relevant and comprehensive program offering eight-hour tracks on orthotic therapy, chronic wound management, and basic surgical skills, with 20 mininute lectures and afternoon "hands-on" workshops. Also on the program, special four-hour focus sessions on diagnostic ultrasound, punch biopsy and plastic surgery, electronic medical records and HIPAA compliance. Plus an exhibition and social sessions (including Mickey Mouse!) And 25 CMEs with top faculty. For the latest Program, Registration Information, Hotel Reservations/Disney World Tickets, and other details about the conference click here. Questions call 1-800-265-8263.More

Current and emerging options for intervention in CLI
Podiatry Today
The treatment of PAD necessitates a collaborative and multidisciplinary approach. This involves podiatrists and vascular practitioners employing the most effective surgical and wound care strategies. The common goals of practitioners in managing this challenging condition should be consistently high rates of wound healing and limb salvage.More

Depression linked to slow healing of diabetic foot ulcers
Bloomberg Businessweek via Healthday
The healing of diabetes-related foot ulcers is affected by patients' coping styles and their levels of depression, new research shows. The study included 93 diabetic patients with foot ulcers who were monitored for 24 weeks. The size of each patient's ulcer was measured at the start of the study, and again at six, 12 and 24 weeks. The researchers also assessed the participants' levels of psychological distress, coping styles and levels of the stress hormone cortisol. More

Foot doctors can help diabetics avoid amputation: study
Bloomberg Businessweek via Healthday
Being treated by a podiatrist helps diabetes patients reduce their risk of amputation, research shows. Podiatrists, also called podiatric physicians, are medical specialists of the foot, ankle and lower leg. "More than half of all amputations in the U.S. are related to diabetes. Podiatrists are detecting conditions that can lead to amputation. That's just what we do," study co-author Dr. James Wrobel, an associate professor of medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science in North Chicago, said in a university news release. More

Doctors rely on iPhones to guide treatment
The Seattle Times
While medical reference information has long been available through the Internet on computers, some physicians say the ability to instantly access data in any situation and through a smartphone is changing the way they practice medicine. More

Ligament tears common in early neuropathic joint disease
MedPage Today
Neuropathic joint disease -- a particularly severe form of rapidly progressive osteoarthritis of the foot and ankle -- is characterized by multiple ligament abnormalities and diffuse bone edema even early in the disease process, a small retrospective British study found.More

Healthy back-to-school footwear combats child obesity
PRWeb
As parents and children commence the annual hunt for deals on back-to-school items, shopping for healthy shoes should top the "must-buy" list for more important reasons than just a fashionable new look. According to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA), well-fitting shoes not only reduce the instance of foot and ankle injuries in kids, they also encourage physical activity, helping to decrease the likelihood of childhood obesity.More



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Why barefoot is best for children
Guardian.co.uk
Tracy Byrne, a podiatrist specializing in podopaediatrics, believes that wearing shoes at too young an age can hamper a child's walking and cerebral development. "Toddlers keep their heads up more when they are walking barefoot," she says. "The feedback they get from the ground means there is less need to look down, which is what puts them off balance and causes them to fall down."More



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