ARSA Dispatch
March 18, 2009
ARSA 2009 Annual Repair Symposium – One Week Away!
ARSA will hold Legislative Day and the Annual Repair Symposium March 26-28, 2009 at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Pentagon City, VA. Come join aviation professionals from around the world and participate in this extraordinary event. Legislative Day and the Annual Repair Symposium are the perfect places to connect with officials from the FAA and other aviation authorities, as well as key members of Congress and your colleagues throughout the industry.

The Symposium will include a variety of sessions on topical subjects. Legislative Day will inform you about the issues that affect your business, and includes the opportunity for you to arrange Capitol Hill meetings with your representatives, senators and congressional staff.

ARSA Says: U.S. Proposals Could Hit EASA-FAA Pact
from Fight Global
A stronger protectionist stance in the administration of President Barack Obama could give lawmakers leverage to usher through legislation altering oversight of foreign repair stations. This could jeopardize a safety bilateral between the European Aviation Safety Agency and the US Federal Aviation Administration. More

American Airlines Faces More Maintenance Questions
from BusinessWeek
American Airlines says the engine failure that caused a jet to make an emergency landing in New York last week may have been caused by an object -- something other than a bird -- sucked into the engine. An American spokesman defended the airline's maintenance of the jet, saying it had been put through all required safety inspections and that it appeared to be operating normally. More

Boeing 777 Safety Measures 'Insufficient' to Prevent Risk of Disaster
from The Times
Interim safety measures put in place on 220 airliners with an engine flaw are “insufficient” to prevent the risk of a fatal crash, according to the U.S. air safety body. The National Transportation Safety Board said that passengers could not be sure that the procedures, adopted by airlines flying Boeing 777s with Rolls-Royce engines, would work. More

Duncan Aviation Cutback Costs 170 jobs in Lincoln, Neb.
from the Omaha World-Herald via Acquire Media NewsEdge
Job cuts by Duncan Aviation Monday left 304 people out of work, 170 of them at the company's headquarters and main plant in Lincoln, Neb. Another 122 were cut at the company's second-biggest location, Battle Creek-Kalamazoo, Mich. The 12 other layoffs occurred at Duncan's 21 smaller locations around the country. More

Indian Flight Safety under U.S. Scanner
from The Times of India
Indian aviation safety regulatory mechanism will be under the US scanner for five days beginning this week. A six-member team from the American Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Singapore and Washington offices will essentially look into three aspects — licensing of personnel, aircraft maintenance and compliance of regulations. More

Mcast Placed on World Map of Aircraft Maintenance Training
from the Times of Malta
Demand for highly skilled aviation maintenance personnel in Malta has been growing steadily with the setting-up of Air Malta in 1973, the establishment in 1978 of Medavia, a company offering a range of aviation services to oil industry companies in North Africa, and the founding of Lufthansa Technik Malta in 2002. The growth of the aviation maintenance and repair sector is in line with the strategy to lessen the economy's over-dependence on key sectors, such as tourism and electronics, and its vulnerability to global business cycle shocks. More

Aviation MRO Segment Poised to Grow
from Sify
As a support service to the aviation industry, India’s MRO (Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul) segment is estimated to grow at 10 per cent and reach $1.17 billion by 2010 and $2.6 billion by 2020, according to Changing Dynamics, a study on India’s aerospace industry undertaken jointly by the Confederation of Indian Industry and PricewaterhouseCoopers. More

OEMs as MRO Integrators
from Aviation Week
Shedding, integrating and consolidating should be major themes of aircraft maintenance in the next few years. Some airlines want to shed technical tasks and management burdens that others can do more economically. Maintenance providers will need to integrate repairs, materials, logistics and management to take over these tasks. And because there are so many parts suppliers, efficient support will require some consolidation of the supply chain to make it all workable. More

Arkansas College Receives a Big Jet Engine
fromKAIT-TV
Arkansas Northeastern College in Blytheville, Ark., is looking ahead when it comes to working with local industry. A new aircraft maintenance company that opened up last fall at the old air base will need trained technicians. Today the first tool of the college's new aviation program rolled through the door...but just barely. More

Boeing Commercial Chief on MRO Consolidation, Opportunities
from Aviation Week
There are more maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) organizations today than the world needs, said Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Scott Carson at J.P Morgan Aviation & Transportation conference in New York on March 10. He said he expects to see a change in the number of MRO organizations moving forward, primarily through consolidation. More

Croatia Airlines Agrees to Deal with Lufthansa Technik
from Croatian Times
Croatia Airlines is set to carry out C-checks on Airbus A320 aircraft for Lufthansa Technik, it has been revealed. Aircraft Maintenance Technology reports the deal is the latest collaborative effort between the two companies in a relationship stretching back to 1992. More

ExecuJet Expands Maintenance Services in Asia Pacific
from AsiaTravelTips.com
ExecuJet Aviation Group is expanding its international and local business presence in Asia Pacific with the opening of aircraft maintenance facilities in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia as well as in Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia. More

Arizona Community College Opens Hangar for MX Program
from the East Valley Tribune
Chandler-Gilbert Community College opened a $4.2 million hangar Wednesday at its Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport campus. The 22,000-square-foot facility houses offices, learning space and a flight simulator. It will facilitate a 40 percent increase in the school's student body. More