ASCLS eNewsBytes
Sep. 9, 2014

Why age reduces stem cells' ability to repair muscle
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute via ScienceDaily
As we age, stem cells throughout our bodies gradually lose their capacity to repair damage, even from normal wear and tear. Researchers from the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and University of Ottawa have discovered the reason why this decline occurs in our skeletal muscle. Their findings were published online in the influential journal Nature Medicine.More

New mechanism in gene regulation revealed
HealthCanal
The information encoded in our genes is translated into proteins, which ultimately mediate biological functions in an organism. Messenger RNA plays an important role, as it is the molecular template used for translation. Scientist from the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technische Universität München, in collaboration with the Centre for Genomic Regulation and colleagues in Grenoble, France, have now unraveled a molecular mechanism of mRNA recognition, which is essential for understanding differential gene regulation in male and female organisms. More

FDA pushes forward with plans to regulate laboratory-developed tests in a move that will impact many clinical laboratory companies and pathology groups
DARK Daily
After sitting in a state of suspended animation for several years, the Food and Drug Administration's plans to regulate laboratory-developed tests are now front and center. On July 31, the FDA served the required 60-day legal notice to Congress that it was ready to move forward to issue rules for regulation of laboratory-developed tests.More

Knowing how bacteria take out trash could lead to new antibiotics
Infection Control Today
A collaborative team of scientists including biochemist Peter Chien at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has reconstructed how bacteria tightly control their growth and division, a process known as the cell cycle, by specifically destroying key proteins through regulated protein degradation. Regulated protein degradation uses specific enzymes called energy-dependent proteases to selective destroy certain targets.More

Flu shots effective in pregnant women with or without HIV
Reuters
Tests conducted in 2011 and 2012 show that the influenza vaccine effectively prevents flu infections in pregnant women, whether or not they are infected with HIV. Vaccination also protected newborns during at least the first 24 weeks of life, as long as their mothers were HIV-free. There was no evidence of protection for children born to HIV-positive mothers, but the number of infants who fell into that category in this study was small.More

HIV cure failure in Mississippi baby 'the beginning of a new chapter'
Medical News Today
The near possibility of an HIV cure was recently crippled; the "Mississippi baby" — a child believed to have been functionally cured of HIV — was found to have the virus once again. But although this news is disappointing, researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore say we should not be disheartened, as such "failures" bring us closer to finding a cure for HIV.More

Novel Ebola vaccine shows potential in monkey trial
HealthDay News
An experimental Ebola vaccine has shown promise in a trial involving monkeys. Based on the results of that trial, a two-shot version of the vaccine — which includes a "primer" that jump-starts the immune system before the Ebola vaccine is given — is now being tested for the first time in humans, said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.More

Superbug infection risk increases with length of hospital stay
Medical News Today
Superbugs — bacteria that do not respond to many of the drugs designed to treat them — are an increasing problem, particularly in hospitals. Now, a new study presented at a meeting in the U.S. suggests if a patient develops an infection while staying in a hospital, the chances of that infection becoming drug-resistant increase with each extra day spent in the hospital.More

Why age reduces stem cells' ability to repair muscle
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute via ScienceDaily
As we age, stem cells throughout our bodies gradually lose their capacity to repair damage, even from normal wear and tear. Researchers from the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and University of Ottawa have discovered the reason why this decline occurs in our skeletal muscle. Their findings were published online in the influential journal Nature Medicine.More

Top 10 rankings of EHR market share put Epic 1st as hospitals, physicians and clinical laboratories make progress on interoperability
DARK Daily
Across the nation, clinical laboratories and pathology groups are busy interfacing their laboratory information systems to the electronic health record systems of their client hospitals and physicians. Yet, few laboratory managers know which EHR systems are dominating the market and which EHR systems are barely surviving. More

New insights into the survival and transmission strategy of malaria parasites
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute via Infection Control Today
HP1 proteins are found in most eukaryotic organisms and are important regulators of gene silencing. In short, HP1 induces heritable condensation of chromosomal regions. As a result, genes located within these regions are not expressed. Importantly, since this conformation is reversible, HP1-controlled genes can become activated without requiring changes in the underlying DNA sequence.More

How soy supplements may affect breast cancer genes
LiveScience via Fox News
Taking soy protein supplements may lead to some concerning genetic changes for women with breast cancer, a new study suggests. In the study, half of the 140 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer took soy protein powder, and the other half took a placebo for between seven and 30 days before they had surgery to remove their cancer.More

New protagonist in cell reprogramming discovered
Centre for Genomic Regulation via Science Codex
The protein NANOG, a transcription factor, is key to maintaining stem cells in a pluripotent state. Researchers from the Centre for Genomic Regulation have been investigating the role of this protein, and have just published an article in the prestigious journal Cell Reports where they reveal the mechanism whereby NANOG acts. The scientists have discovered that NANOG involves other agents, and they have been able to detail their dynamics. More