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Worried parents balk at HPV vaccine for daughters
NPR
More parents are worried about getting their daughters vaccinated against cervical cancer, despite more doctors saying the shots are a good idea. Over a three-year period ending in 2010, concerns about side effects more than tripled to 16 percent from about 5 percent among parents who didn't intend to get their teenage daughters vaccinated, according to a study published online by the journal Pediatrics.
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Congratulations to the ASCT 2013-14 new officers!
American Society for Cytotechnology
Officers for 2013-14 are Keisha Brooks of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, president-elect; Courtney Robinson of the University of Kansas Hospital, regional director for Region 2; and Allison Wrenn III of the University of Alabama at Birmingham; regional director for Region 4.
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UPCOMING EVENTS





Event Location Date Details

North Carolina Society of Cytology
Spring 2013 Annual Meeting
Durham, N.C.    

 April 5-6
   
   
More information

ASCT Annual Conference Hotel Valley Ho
Scottsdale, Ariz.
   

April 19-20
   
   
More information

McGill Cytopathology Review Course Montreal, Quebec, Canada    

April 27-30
   
   
Email
or call (514) 934-8253
for more information




INDUSTRY NEWS


Researchers: HPV vaccine more effective when begun younger
UPI
Beginning human papillomavirus vaccinations at a young age is important for maximizing its effectiveness, researchers in Sweden say. Amy Leval of the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and colleagues looked at a group of females ages 10-44 living in Sweden between 2006-10, who were linked to multiple population registers to identify genital warts incidence in relation to HPV vaccination.
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Ovarian cancer may arise from stem-like cells
Medical News Today
Scientists have discovered that the ovary contains a group of cells similar to stem cells that can mutate to form tumors. In a study of mouse ovaries, they found they could coax the stem-like cells to become cancerous by switching off two tumor-suppressing genes. The study is likely to make a significant contribution to what we know about ovarian cancer.
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Highlighting cancer divide between rich, poor nations
The Boston Globe
Harvard health economist Felicia Knaul had long fought for the interests of poor people in Latin America when a breast cancer diagnosis brought her attention to tremendous global disparities in health care. Knaul, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School and director of the Harvard Global Equity Initiative, spoke about that disparity recently at a Harvard School of Public Health World Cancer Day event, and wrote about it in a recently published book, "Beauty Without the Breast."
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Study: Gene therapy could treat cancer
ABC News
VideoBrief A clinical trial using a patient's own immune system to produce remissions in adults with acute leukemia could be a major breakthrough in the fight against all different kinds of cancer. The new study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, took five patients with untreatable cancer, and using their own immune systems, injected genetic material into the patient's white cells to turn them into cancer fighters.
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Blood test tracks response to cancer treatment
Medical News Today
A blood test that tracks fragments of DNA shed by dying tumor cells could one day be used to monitor how well patients are responding to cancer treatment, according to a small study in women with advanced breast cancer. Such a test could provide a non-invasive alternative to biopsies and help adapt treatment to individual patients and the progress of disease.
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MORE NEWS


Researchers pair experiments with computer models to peer into cells
University of Warwick via PhysOrg
BBSRC-funded researchers have developed a new strategy that can give scientists a better insight into how complex molecular machineries function in living cells. In research published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology, the team from the University of Warwick, Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocenter and Liverpool University, showed how to extract in vivo information about how complex molecular systems in yeast cells are controlled.
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Cell fusion studies at Johns Hopkins could lead to improved treatments for muscular dystrophy
The Medical News
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have established a high-efficiency cell-cell fusion system, providing a new model to study how fusion works. The discovery, researchers say, could lead to improved treatments for muscular dystrophy, since muscle regeneration relies on cell fusion to make muscle fibers that contain hundreds or even thousands of nuclei.
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New handheld HIV testing device faster, cheaper than ELISA tests performed in clinical pathology laboratories
Dark Daily
Picture a point-of-care device that produces highly accurate HIV results at a lower cost and 10 times faster than traditional ELISA testing currently done by clinical laboratories — then automatically, instantaneously transmits and synchronizes the results with cloud-based electronic healthcare records. This device is a reality and was developed by researchers at Columbia University in New York City.
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Meningitis spreading via anonymous sex in New York City
ABC News
New York City health officials are urging some men to get vaccinated against meningitis amid an outbreak that has sickened 22 New Yorkers and killed seven. The dangerous strain of bacterial meningitis appears to be spreading through sexual encounters between men who meet through websites or smartphone apps, or at bars or parties, according to the city's health department.
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ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Bob Kowalski, Content Editor, 469.420.2650   
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