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Dogs help in sniffing out ovarian cancer
Counsel & Heal
In a new program, trainers are trying to teach dogs how to sniff out ovarian cancer tissue and so far, these dogs have continued to wow humans. At the Penn Vet Working Dog Center, there are currently 15 dogs in training to sniff out bombs, drugs and missing people. These amazing dogs are now being trained to see if they can sniff out ovarian cancer tissue.
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ASCT announces the next Bob Gay Lecture Series speaker!
American Society for Cytotechnology
Save the date for the 2014 ASCT Annual Conference! The Conference will be held from April 25-27, at the Charleston Marriott in Charleston, S.C. In addition to the usual high-caliber offerings for everyone from students to seasoned managers, the 2014 Bob Gay Lecture Series speaker will be Dr. Richard M. DeMay. Dr. DeMay, from the University of Chicago, is well known as a national and international speaker and as the author of several excellent, highly regarded Cytopathology textbooks. He truly is a speaker who does not need an introduction!
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UPCOMING EVENTS

Date Event Location More information
Sept. 4, 2 p.m. ET Safety Strategies in the Cytology Laboratory Your PC The webinar will feature Dan Scungio, MT (ASCP), SLS, CQA (ASQ), Laboratory Safety Officer, Sentara Healthcare, Tidewater, Va.
More information
Register

Sept. 28

Cytology Association of Alabama Annual Meeting

The Club, Birmingham, Ala.

More information

Oct. 5

St. Louis Society of Cytology Annual Meeting

Norwood Hills Country Club, St. Louis, Mo.

More information

Available 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC) Document Control for Cytopathology Workbench

Your PC

Details

Available 6 months after subscribing

Quality Assessment Center (QAC)
The LEAN Cytopathology Laboratory Workbench

Your PC

Details


INDUSTRY NEWS


CDC: HPV vaccine effective but grossly underutilized
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
A recent report from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention titled, "HPV vaccine: Safe, effective, and grossly underutilized" claims that not enough parents are making the decision to have their children vaccinated against the disease. "There is no doubt in my mind that the vaccine is underutilized," said Jonathan Pletcher, clinical director for the division of adolescent medicine at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, "I think there's generally a lack of understanding about HPV."
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Study: HPV raises esophageal cancer risk
Oncology Nurse Advisor
The human papillomavirus triples the risk of people developing yet another cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, according to new research. In addition to causing cervical, anal and genital cancer, HPV has also recently been found to cause some head and neck cancers.
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Are women receiving proper treatment for HPV and cervical cancer?
By Jessica Taylor
According to the Centers of for Disease Control and Prevention, most sexually active people in the United States will have human papillomavirus at some time in their lives. The National Cancer Institute states that HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the world. As a result, about 12,000 women in the U.S. get cervical cancer each year, but are they being treated correctly?
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Industry Pulse: How often should women visit the OB-GYN?
ANSWER NOW


Henrietta Lacks: Family wins recognition for immortal cells
BBC News
The family of a woman whose cells revolutionized medical research have been granted a say over how they are used, six decades after her death. Henrietta Lacks, a poor black woman from Maryland, had cells removed from her by doctors when she was being treated for terminal cancer in 1951. Researchers found they were the first human cells that could be grown indefinitely in a laboratory. The historic breakthrough paved the way for countless medical treatments.
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MORE NEWS


Researchers witness new type of cell division, use it to battle cancer
University of Wisconsin-Madison via Medical Xpress
The surprise discovery in humans of a type of human cell division previously seen only in slime molds has put a University of Wisconsin research team on a path to prevent some common and deadly cancers. While on their way to finding a means to attack certain types of cancers, the researchers made the first observations of cytofission in humans, a type of cell division that occurs at a different time than normal division.
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Cells eat themselves into shape
European Molecular Biology Laboratory via PhysOrg
The process cells use to "swallow" up nutrients, hormones and other signals from their environment — called endocytosis — can play a crucial role in shaping the cells themselves, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany, have found. The study, published in Nature Communications, could help explain how the cells on your skin become different from those that line your stomach or intestine.
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New type of protein modification may play a role in cancer and diabetes
The Scripps Research Institute via ScienceDaily
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a new type of chemical modification that affects numerous proteins within mammalian cells. The modification appears to work as a regulator of important cellular processes, including the metabolism of glucose. Further study of this modification could provide insights into the causes of diabetes, cancer and other disorders.
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Scientists devise more efficient, precise method to insert DNA into living cells
Nature World News
A team of scientists have devised a new method of inserting foreign DNA into cells that, they say, is far more gentle and precise than any that have come before it. Described in the journal Biomedical Optics Express, the technique includes poking holes on the surface of a cell using a high-powered "femtosecond" laser and retrieving a piece of DNA with "optical tweezers" like a high-tech version of the game Operation.
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ASCT Viewpoint
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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