AUTM Newsbrief
Jan. 20, 2011

Virus killer gets supercharged, discovery
improves common disinfectant

Infection Control Today
A simple technique to make a common virus-killing material significantly more effective is a breakthrough from the Rice University labs in Houston. Rather than trying to turn the process into profit, the researchers have put it into the public domain. They hope wide adoption will save time, money and perhaps even lives. The Rice professors and their team reported in Environmental Science and Technology, an American Chemical Society journal, that adding silicone to titanium dioxide, a common disinfectant, dramatically increases its ability to degrade aerosol- and waterborne viruses. More

University of Texas at Austin scientists partner with leading plastic solar cell manufacturer
The University of Texas at Austin
A formal partnership between researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Konarka Technologies Inc. could lead to improved plastic solar cell technologies. The partnership matches faculty that are supported by energy-related grants from the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation with one of the world's leading manufacturers of plastic solar cells. More

Yale tech spinoff chooses Sci Park
Connecticut Business News Journal
HDB Newco Inc. has become the newest tenant of CTech@Science Park at Yale, the New Haven, Conn., technology business incubator is managed by Connecticut Innovations Inc. Employing technology licensed from Yale University, HDB Newco is developing an open-source parallel database management system that the company says offers high performance and scalability to meet the analytical processing demands of data-driven enterprises. The technology is intended to be used by enterprises to extract critical analytical information from large databases.More

Utah scientists harness electrons for better wastewater cleaning
NewWest
The microscopic domain of certain highly useful microbes is well known by Jack Adams, a metallurgical engineering research professor at the University of Utah and president of startup company Inotec. Along with company co-founder Mike Peoples, a doctoral student in environmental engineering, he has refined a method for cleaning contaminated mining wastewater that uses microbes and a steady stream of electrons. More

New NUS spinoff company to develop novel electrocardiogram
SGPressCentre
A new spinoff company from the National University of Singapore (NUS) is set to enter the global cardiac health care market. Clearbridge VitalSigns, the medical device startup company, will develop and commercialize an NUS invention, which is a novel, ultra-low powered electrocardiogram (ECG) chip. The research behind the ECG chip was conducted at the NUS Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and funded by the Agency for Science, Technology and Research through the Thematic Strategic Research Program. More

Oxford PV develops new thin-film solar cell
Renewable Energy Focus
Oxford PV's new device is a form of thin-film solar technology, which replaces the liquid electrolyte with a solid organic semiconductor, enabling entire solar modules to be screen printed onto glass or other surfaces. The company says the materials used are plentiful, environmentally benign and very low cost, and predicts the manufacturing costs of this product will be around 50 percent less than the current lowest-cost thin film technology. The technology is based on research from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. By combining earlier research on artificial photosynthetic electrochemical solar cells and semiconducting plastics, Oxford PV says it can now create manufacturable solid-state dye sensitised solar cells.More

The University of Michigan incubator sets out to fast track ideas
The Detroit News
The University of Michigan (U-M) unveiled an incubator to help university researchers and fledgling companies put their inventions on the fast track to the marketplace. The Tech Transfer Venture Accelerator, led by the U-M Technology Transfer Office, provides space at minimal cost to startup companies headed by faculty entrepreneurs and others in Pfizer's former two-million-square-foot facility in Ann Arbor. There are five initial startup firms. Entrepreneurs, investors and businesses can collaborate on research and technology that can be spun off to companies such as Ford Motor Co. or Dow Chemical Co., or form the basis for a separate company, said Ken Nisbet, executive director of the U-M Tech Transfer Office. More

Western Kentucky University partners with Owensboro, Ky., for startups
The Associated Press via The Lexington Herald-Leader
Owensboro, Ky., and Western Kentucky University are joining forces to work with existing companies and help foster new startup companies in the area. A statement from Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corp. says the partnership creates Owensboro-based applied research programs in plant biotechnology and food science in lab space at the Center for Business and Research.More