AUTM Newsbrief
Aug. 5, 2010

Eli Lilly, Schlumberger, Amazon, HP, Levi Strauss: Intellectual property
Bloomberg
Facebook was started in 2004 by Harvard University undergraduate Mark Zuckerberg. It reportedly had 2009 revenue of more than $700 million, and Zuckerberg is presently facing a suit in federal court in Buffalo, New York, alleging a New York resident is entitled to 84 percent of the company. In its decision in the patent case, the jury also ruled that Facebook's technology did infringe claims of the patent. Under U.S. patent law, an invalid patent cannot be infringed.More

Canadian Intellectual Property Office proposes accelerated examination of green technology patent applications
Lexology (subscription required)
Canada continues to promote innovation in green technologies, with the Canadian Intellectual Property Office recently proposing amendments to the patent rules to accelerate the examination of green technology patent applications. Eligible patent applications include those relating to technology that, if commercialized, could help resolve or mitigate environmental impacts or conserve the natural environment and resources.More

Harvard University Institute unveils software that helps build academic sites
The Chronicle of Higher Education
Last week, a team at Harvard University rolled out the latest release of a program that helps researchers create their own Web sites. The open-source software, OpenScholar, seeks to make building and customizing Web sites simple and straightforward, even for academics who aren't tech-savvy. There are currently two versions of the software — one for scholars to create a personal Web site and one for researchers to build a project Web site.More

On implementing the Technology Transfer Act of 2009
Business Mirror
The TTA seeks to promote the commercialization of intellectual property technology and knowledge resulting from research and development to ultimately benefit national development. To achieve this, the TTA addresses, among other things, issues of ownership of intellectual property in research and development institutes; rights and responsibilities of government funding agencies and RDIs; management of intellectual property derived from R&D performed by government RDIs through their own budget; revenue sharing; and commercialization through spinoff companies.More

Science symposium matches research to investors
Green Bay Press-Gazette
A biology professor at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh is looking for ways to use algae to make items ranging from rubber to biofuels. Toivo Kallas said he hopes the research will be far enough along a year from now to market the idea to businesses at the next Wisconsin Science & Technology Symposium. Kallas attended this year's third annual symposium at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. The event helps university researchers market their discoveries to businesses.More

Auburn researchers finding ways to turn waste into fuel
The Auburn Plainsman
Auburn University researchers have patented a new process for producing ethanol from paper mill waste materials through biological conversion. With research funded by the Masada Resource group, the new conversion process can produce an estimated 2.5 million gallons of ethanol a year from one paper mill.More

Squire Sanders expands life sciences intellectual property practice
PR Newswire
Nationally known intellectual property litigator Gerald P. "Jerry" Dodson has joined global law firm Squire, Sanders & Dempsey L.L.P. Also joining the firm is patent lawyer Carol A. Schneider, Ph.D. The firm continues to add top-tier talent to meet the dramatically increased demands on its intellectual property life sciences practice.More

University of Delaware looking beyond cash as payoff for innovations
The News Journal
The geography and soil science researcher excitedly explained the funny-looking laser device he co-created. It could measure the texture of tree bark and determine the flow of water down the stem. No device had accomplished that before, he beamed. The non-scientists in the room seemed unimpressed.More