AzPA Pharmacy Flash
Apr. 9, 2014

AzPA Anticoagulation Certificate Training Program
AzPA

Thursday, June 26
The Wigwam
Litchfield Park, Ariz.


This certificate program is a comprehensive program designed to provide pharmacists with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to care for patients taking anticoagulation therapies. More

Delivering Medication Therapy Management Services in the Community
AzPA


Thursday, June 26
The Wigwam
Litchfield Park, Ariz.


Delivering Medication Therapy Management Services in the Community is an innovative and interactive certificate training program that explores the pharmacist’s role in providing MTM services to patients. Register today. More

PQA April Quality Forum Lecture Series
Recommendation from a Consensus Conference on Improving Drug-Drug Interaction Clinical Decision Support

AzPA
April's Quality Forum Lecture will be presented by Daniel C. Malone and Lisa E. Hines from the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy and Gerald K. McEvoy from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. The presenters will provide recommendations for improving drug-drug interaction clinical decision support developed through an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality-sponsored conference series. This lecture will be held April 24 at 1 p.m. More

3 surefire ways to kill your pharmacy business
By Greg L. Alston
When I started in pharmacy in 1975, doctors could check a box on the prescription that said "do not label," and we would not be allowed to tell the patient what was in the bottle. There were no pharmacy technicians, no computers, no patient profiles and no clinical coursework was required in pharmacy school. Now computers not only print the labels and manage profiles, but they also perform all of the billing for prescriptions. The funny thing is that through all of these changes in scope of practice and technology, the simple principles of running a drugstore have not changed.More

How many technicians is too many for 1 pharmacist to supervise?
The Palm Beach Post (commentary)
How many prescriptions can one pharmacist be responsible for before there is too much risk to the public? That was the central question last year as Florida legislators debated raising the number of technicians who can be assigned to a single pharmacist for supervision. It is the central question again this year, as similar legislation moves through House and Senate committees.More

Pharmacists well placed to educate about dietary supplements
Medscape
Pharmacists are the ideal people to inform patients about the correct and incorrect use of dietary supplements, which are increasingly being used and can be harmful, especially if a person has a chronic health condition, according to information presented at the American Pharmacists Association 2014 Annual Meeting and Exposition in Orlando, Fla.More

Helping doctors spot who's not taking their blood pressure meds
HealthDay News
A simple urine test for people with high blood pressure could help doctors determine if patients aren't taking their medication as directed or whether their body isn't respond to treatment, a new study suggests.More

1 in 3 patients fail to fill initial prescriptions
Medscape
Nearly one-third of all initial drug prescriptions were not filled within nine months, with nonadherence highest for expensive drugs and chronic preventive therapies, according to a primary care network cohort study published in the 1 April issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.More

Looking to share your expertise?
MultiBriefs
In an effort to enhance the overall content of Pharmacy Flash, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of the healthcare industry, your knowledge lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit and our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.More

FDA approves heroin/painkiller overdose antidote
USA Today
The Food and Drug Administration approved a device that reverses the effects of overdoses from opioids, including heroin and prescription painkillers. Called Evzio, the injection-style device administers the drug naloxone.More

Pharmacy's 'monster spray' cures kids' fear of the dark
The Huffington Post
A pharmacy in North Dakota has put a little girl's fears to bed, prescribing a bottle of "Monster Spray" to help keep at bay all the things that go "bump" in the night.More

Is pharmacy a smart career choice?
By Jason Poquette
Ever since U.S. News and World Report listed pharmacy as the No. 5 best job for 2014, the profession has been hotly debating the question of the future of our career path. Some say it's over because of dangerously-busy working conditions. More

Experimental breast cancer drug seems safe, effective for advanced disease
HealthDay News
In an early trial, an experimental breast cancer drug stopped disease growth and shrank tumors by more than 30 percent in some patients. The pill, bemaciclib, was safe and well-tolerated by women with breast cancer that had spread, or metastasized, to other parts of the body, according to the results of this phase 1 trial.More

Sublingual immunotherapy approved for grass pollen allergies
ASHP
The FDA recently announced its approval of a sublingual alternative to immunotherapy injections for people 10 to 65 years of age who are allergic to sweet vernalgrass, orchardgrass, perennial ryegrass, timothy or Kentucky bluegrass. Each tablet, the agency said, contains freeze-dried pollen extracts of those five perennial grasses.More

FDA approves heroin/painkiller overdose antidote
USA Today
The Food and Drug Administration approved a device that reverses the effects of overdoses from opioids, including heroin and prescription painkillers. Called Evzio, the injection-style device administers the drug naloxone.More

Antibiotic use linked with most C diff infections in kids
Pharmacy Times
Almost three-fourths of children diagnosed with Clostridium difficile infection were prescribed antibiotics during the months leading up to their diagnosis, according to the results of a new study. The study, published online on March 3, 2014, in Pediatrics, also found that the majority of CDI cases among children were associated with the community. More