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We all deserve dental care
Huffington Post
Across Ontario, going to the dentist is financially out of reach for many people. This dilemma is well-known to physicians -- many of us regularly care for patients who have terrible dental problems that we are powerless to address. We see people who have delayed seeking care that they can't afford until they are in terrible pain or their health is at risk. For example, poor dental health is a risk factor for poor nutrition because of its impact on eating habits, and may also be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We see people who have trouble finding employment, miss school, or avoid social situations because of the condition of their teeth. We see people who avoid eating because their mouths constantly hurt.
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'I can't chew, you know, because the teeth are very weak'
Washington Post
I’ve researched various issues at the boundaries of public health and poverty policy. One basic issue seems to always lurk: bad teeth. I can't count the times this health problem has come up when I've talked with a homeless person, someone with a mental health or substance use disorder, or someone who is simply quite poor. When I meet people who have gotten past a bad patch in their lives, their dental problems — including missing teeth or yellowed gums — still need treatment, stigmatizing reminders of what these people otherwise had left behind.
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Study: Oral health awareness 'suboptimal' in teens with diabetes
Dr . Bicuspid
Educating adolescent patients with diabetes about oral hygiene can go a long way toward improving their overall health, according to a study presented at the recent International Association for Dental Research (IADR) meeting in Seattle. The researchers found that less than half of the adolescents with type 1 diabetes in their study strongly agreed that taking care of their gums is as important as taking care of their medical health.
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The 6 biggest trends in dentistry
Hive Health Media
Since the early days of the cave man, teeth have become part of our overall aesthetic appeal. A set of dazzling white, straight teeth can enhance a person's natural beauty. We spend thousands of dollars on orthodontics with the hopes of achieving a perfect smile. For most, practising good oral health has become part of our daily routine. We now know that proper dental care can help to prevent and treat gum disease, tooth rot and other medical conditions.
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Nutrition plays key role in oral health
DNA.com
There is a strong connection between the food people eat and their oral health, a recently updated position paper of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has stated. The Academy's position paper highlighted that nutrition is an integral component of oral health.
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Fluoride necessary for better dental health
Published By Daily Democrat
Twenty years ago I took my first job in the public health field in San Diego where I worked my way through graduate school as a dental health educator. The name of the program wasn't fancy; it was called the Dental Disease Prevention Program. And it guaranteed that the kids in San Diego's poorest schools had access to basic oral health tools. At that time San Diego's water supply wasn't fluoridated and dental decay rates among school age children were high.

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There's more to a smile than teeth
richardcasson.com
Our teeth are a major part of our identity and having great teeth makes us look and feel more attractive. Whenever we smile or laugh our teeth are on show and the better our dental health and hygiene the more confident we feel.

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How sanitary is your dentist's office?
EpowHer via Fox News
The shocking news that thousands of patients who visited Dr. Scott Harrington's Oklahoma oral surgery practice since 2007 may have been exposed to hepatitis B, C, and HIV as well as unsanitary and non-sterile conditions, is a wake-up call for doctors, patients, and especially health departments everywhere.

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New Zealand company aims to change fragmented dental business, introduce concept of affordability
Interest.co.nz
Technology these days has meant going to the dentist tends to be less about the physical pain you endure sitting in the surgery and more about the pain you experience when it comes to payment. It's an issue that has many people putting off a trip to the dentist altogether until a visit becomes absolutely necessary and by then the problem has usually become significantly worse.
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Affordable Care Act falls well short in improving health outcomes, reveals new ADA analysis
News Medical
When it comes to access to routine dental care, a major determinant of oral health, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) falls well short in its goals of lowering costs, increasing access and improving health outcomes, according to new analysis by the American Dental Association. But in a series of three new research briefs, the association's Health Policy Resources Center (HPRC) also reports that state governments have the ability to pick up where the ACA left off, by employing critical policy levers at their disposal.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Offer of free dental care in Victoria draws long lineups (Times Colonist)
Why your fingers shouldn't be in the picture (Dental Buzz)
Coffee can decrease tooth decay (Web Dental)

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Dental Assistants Weekly

Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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Noelle Munaretto, Senior Content Editor, 289.695.5414   
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April 30, 2013
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