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Push to get dentists to stop routinely prescribing potentially deadly opioids
Ottawa Citizen
At a time when death rates from opioids are raising alarms, dentists are being told to stop routinely prescribing painkillers such as OxyContin to patients who have had their wisdom teeth removed or other dental surgery. In light of a recent Ontario study that found opioids are a leading cause of death among young adults, several Ottawa parents, including a public health professional, have told the Citizen they became concerned when their teenagers were prescribed OxyContin for pain after their wisdom teeth were taken out. One mother said she flushed her son’s medication down the toilet out of concern that it is addictive and could be abused.
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Edmonton's student dentists offer affordable care for the poor
Edmonton Sun
If it weren't for the SHINE Dental Clinic, Irene wouldn't know where else to go. The single parent, who asked not to use her last name, accidentally stumbled across the student-run clinic at the Boyle McCauley Health Centre close to three months ago when her seven-year-old daughter, Gail, came down with a pretty nasty toothache. Together, they came to the McCauley Clinic hoping to get cheap dental work done when staff there referred her to the SHINE (Student Health Initiative for the Needs of Edmonton) Dental Clinic, which for the past nine years has been offering free dental work to Edmonton’s inner-city population every Saturday.
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How to fight the culture of cliques within your dental team
Dental Products Report
Throughout her illustrious and storied career as a dental practice management consultant, Linda Miles has seen a lot of things that can negatively impact a dental practice. But perhaps none of them are as big or as costly as when members of the dental team form cliques or circles to keep things from other members of the dental team. Be it doctor versus team or team members versus team members, these vicious circles can have devastating impacts on the practice's culture.
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Should dental assistant discourage referrals after poor treatment?
Dentistry IQ
QUESTION: I'm a dental assistant who recently had an experience as a dental patient, and it was not pleasant. I had a consultation for a crown lengthening procedure, and the dentist I work for referred me to the periodontist. It was determined I need an implant, and they could do the implant I've been putting off. I came out with a $3,300 treatment plan, a surgery appointment for the end of July (my consult was in March), and my name on a cancellation list. (I asked for June because that would give me time to hear back from insurance, get my portion of the finances in order, and it was before my benefit year reset.)
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On the link between periodontitis and atherosclerosis
Science Daily
Chronic oral infection with the periodontal disease pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, not only causes local inflammation of the gums leading to tooth loss but also is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis. A new study reveals how the pathogen evades the immune system to induce inflammation beyond the oral cavity.
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Substance may provide boost to enamel
Dentistry Today
It may be beneficial to your health if you eat more dark chocolate. A dentist from Beverly Hills, California, claims that a bitter power found in dark chocolate, theobromine, can actually harden the enamel. This would add protection to the teeth against the possible impact of staining.

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Dental assisting schools are the first rung on the ladder to promoting professionalism
Dental Assistant
In school, we are taught there are nine dental specialists; Pediatric Dentists, Orthodontists, Endodontists, Periodontists, Prosthodontists, Oral Maxillofacial Pathology, Oral Maxillofacial Radiology and Oral Maxillofacial Surgery. During our externship, we were encouraged to visit as many of the specialty offices we could as well as the general dentist.

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Shifts in the composition of the oral microbiome may be promoters or causes of oral cancer
Medical News Today
Each year, approximately 22,000 Americans are diagnosed with oral cancer. The five-year survival rate of 40 per cent in the U.S. is one of the lowest of the major cancers, and it has not improved in the past 40 years.

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Long term oral care for adults with special needs
Medical News Today
A retrospective study conducted by researchers at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine and colleagues reports that among adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, the likelihood of having cavities decreased as the number of years receiving dental care increased.
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Bad teeth? Blame your genes
CNN
Remember "The Big Book of British Smiles" from "The Simpsons"? The dentist used it to scare children into proper dental hygiene. And let's be honest, it was funny! Because though British tea and good manners have an excellent international reputation, British teeth are mostly used as a punch line. But tooth decay is far from only a British problem — in fact, it's one of the most common chronic disease worldwide.
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FDA changes recommendations on lidocaine for teething pain
Dental Tribune
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that a box warning on prescription products containing viscous lidocaine solution is now required that states that such products should not be used to treat teething pain in children. In response, a U.S. trade association has voiced concerns that such suggestions create confusion among consumers and health care providers. It has urged the FDA to clarify its announcement.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Regulatory body defends use of general anesthesia in dental office (The Record)
Dental assisting schools are the first rung on the ladder to promoting professionalism (ADAA)
Make a positive impression on dental patients with an excellent phone presence (Dentitstry IQ)
Hypersensitivity of teeth (WebDental)
Making a difference: Free dental clinic finds home (Penticton Western News)
Tooth protein offers promise for bone regeneration (Medical News Today)

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Dental Assistants Weekly

Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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Noelle Munaretto, Senior Content Editor, 289.695.5414   
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DISCLAIMER: Articles and advertisements, as well as their claims, do not necessarily represent the viewpoints/opinions of the Canadian Dental Assistants Association (CDAA). The CDAA is not responsible for grammatical errors, misspelled words, unclear syntax or errors in translations, in original sources.

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