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We need to improve dental health of Canada's seniors
Medical News Today
Many seniors in Canada have poor oral health, and we need to start the conversation about how to improve access to dental care for this vulnerable group, argues an editorial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). Poor dental health is linked to serious health conditions such as heart disease, stroke and pneumonia and can affect quality of life.
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Using technology in pediatric dentistry to instill a lifetime of compliant dental care
Dental Economics
How often have you begun an exam on an adult patient and were told of an episode of consternation involving their dental treatment during childhood? Especially one that caused the patient to have an aversion to going to the dentist for many years. An isolated traumatic experience or a series of them may have led your patient to avoid seeing a dentist and fall critically behind on their dental care. Rebuilding the patient's trust as it pertains to their dental treatment may take a lifetime to amend after avoiding dental care during childhood and adolescence.
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Coffee drinkers — your gums may thank you
Medical Xpress
Coffee contains antioxidants. Antioxidants fight gum disease. Does coffee, then, help fight gum disease? That is the question researchers at Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine explored in a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Periodontology.
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Supercomputers reveal that mouth bacteria can change its diet
Medical News Today
acteria inside your mouth drastically change how they act when you're diseased, according to research using supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center.

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Hypersensitivity exposed
Dentistry IQ
Our 21st century lifestyles have many benefits, but also have many consequences — dentinal hypersensitivity being one of them. As dentistry has progressed to the point of bringing diseases of infectious origin — caries, and periodontal disease — under control, a new set of conditions and problems are emerging, including exposed dentin.

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Warning to parents on high acidity drinks
Science Daily
Dental researchers are warning parents of the dangers of soft drinks, fruit juice, sports drinks and other drinks high in acidity, which form part of a "triple-threat" of permanent damage to young people's teeth.

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Avoiding injury with ergonomics
Dental Products Report
For many of us, in our younger years, we thought we were indestructible. We pictured ourselves as Superman or Wonder Woman, with whatever harm that might come our way simply bouncing off of us. As we age, we quickly learn that some of those bullets that we thought we deflected actually did some harm. That's the case with many dental professionals, who work for years before one day discovering that the way they have been sitting or holding an instrument has done irreversible harm.
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Steep decline in tooth loss, increase in socioeconomic disparities found by study
Science Daily
Edentulism (tooth loss) has been the focus of a recent study, which traced it over the last hundred years. The project's report highlights the numbers of people losing teeth and requiring dentures. The single most influential determinant of the decline was the passing of generations born before the 1940s, whose rate of edentulism incidence far exceeded later cohorts. High income households experienced a greater relative decline, although a smaller absolute decline, than low income households.
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Dental Assistants Weekly

Frank Humada, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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Noelle Munaretto, Senior Content Editor, 289.695.5414   
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DISCLAIMER: Articles and advertisements, as well as their claims, do not necessarily represent the viewpoints/opinions of the Canadian Dental Assistants Association (CDAA). The CDAA is not responsible for grammatical errors, misspelled words, unclear syntax or errors in translations, in original sources.

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