Tech Insights
Mar. 12, 2014

2015 budget would boost investments in STEM education
Nextgov
President Barack Obama's fiscal 2015 budget blueprint proposes a number of changes to improving and strengthening the quality and quantity of workers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.More

Data scientists and the data supply chain
White paper from MTBC CIO Roundtable
The term data scientist was introduced internally within LinkedIn and Facebook, used to indicate "high-ranking professionals with the training and curiosity to make discoveries in the world of big data" who "take huge amounts of data and attempt to pull useful information out. The job combines statistics and programming to identify sometimes subtle factors that can have a big impact on a company's bottom line." Further insight into how the meaning of the term data scientist is evolving is best offered by those who serve in its role or manage those who do; or to put it more simply, a data scientist is as a data scientist does.More

Board profile: Telmar's Bob Hill
MTBC
Bob Hill is vice president of sales U.S. region at Telmar Network Technology, a Jabil company. He joined Telmar in 2009. Hill is actively engaged in the MTBC Talent Team, and his company has adopted a middle school to be more directly involved in influencing the future of these middle school students in STEM fields.More

How to get more women in tech and business
Tech Titan winner Shama Kabani in Forbes
Shama Kabani writes: "Last week a good friend in the VC space came into town and invited me to a tech cocktail hour held by a local incubator. I am rarely able to attend local events in Dallas because I am often on the road due to speaking engagements, but since I was in town, I gladly went. The first thing which struck me as I entered was that I was the only woman in a room of about forty men. Now, a part of me is used to being the only woman at certain industry events, but another part of me is acutely aware that this juxtaposition feels more normal than natural."More

More mentors needed for women in STEM
ITBusinessEdge
Karen Purcell, founder of STEMspire, stated: "One significant reason for our falling behind is that female students are not being encouraged — as they are abroad — to pursue career paths in science, technology, engineering or math. If we want to attract the best and brightest minds into the fields that will move us forward, we can no longer look to only half of the population."More

The 1st woman to get a PhD in computer science from MIT
The Atlantic
Irene Greif always thought she'd be a teacher. "For one thing," she told me, "I'd been told by my mother that it was good to be a teacher because you just worked the hours your kids were in school and you could come home." It had just always been the profession in the back of her mind, the default. So then it must have been a bit of a shock when, after in 1975 becoming the first woman ever to receive a Ph.D. in computer science from MIT, Greif discovered that she didn't really enjoy teaching — she much preferred research.More

Bad winter weather meets big data prediction
InformationWeek
The Weather Company is moving to a NoSQL-powered platform to gather some 20 terabytes of weather data per day. What's the biggest challenge?More

Cybersecurity creates new pressures for IT pros
Baseline
Seemingly overnight, cybersecurity has evolved from an important enterprise function into a mission-critical issue that affects almost every aspect of business and information technology. Getting a handle on the current environment — including cyberattacks, employee access, and choosing and using the right technology and tools — is heaping additional pressure on already overwhelmed IT departments. More

Drones in action: 5 nonmilitary uses
InformationWeek
Government agencies, universities and a few private companies won authorization to use drones in the U.S. Take a peek at the drones on the job.More

Privacy features to be embedded in humanoid robots
Ubergizmo
It goes without saying that human interaction with humanoid robots is a whole lot easier and emotionally involving compared to a traditional robot that we know it as. Having said that, it seems that researchers from Oxford are working to embed privacy features in humanoid robots as part of an exercise to explore the various methods that robots have privacy embedded into their design so that whatever private and confidential information that has been stored within will not be hacked or relayed to someone else with a nefarious purpose.More

Bad winter weather meets big data prediction
InformationWeek
The Weather Company is moving to a NoSQL-powered platform to gather some 20 terabytes of weather data per day. What's the biggest challenge?More

6 skills CEOs prize in CIOs
Information Week
You want to be a CIO? The road to the top isn't about what you want. It's about fulfilling the expectations of your boss and peers. What should I focus on if I want to be a CIO someday? More

Researchers work to give robots the knowledge of good and evil
Times Union
Showing children the difference between good and bad can be frustrating. So, how might complex and sometimes contradictory ideas of morality be imparted into an artificially intelligent machine?More

Why you should welcome difficult customers
Forbes
Strategic decisions often have long-term consequences — in fact, that might be the reason we consider them "strategic" in the first place. Sometimes, organizations have to accept some short-term pain for long-term gain. In a way, any investment is like that. However, conversely, certain decisions with short-term gain can also have more painful consequences in the long-run. The problem is that managers often see the short-term benefits, but they are unaware of the potential long-term negative effects.More

4 speaking tricks that work every time
Inc.
For some reason, the old rules use every trick possible to ... well, trick you. If something makes you uncomfortable, the rules immediately look for a workaround, some way to avoid the issue. So here's a shocker — attempting eye contact can make some people pretty nervous. Therefore, we have the awful Rule to Break No. 1: Scan the back wall to simulate eye contact.More