Tech Insights
Apr. 29, 2015

World-class judges decide winners at Tech Titans Awards
MTBC
This year's judges for the Tech Titans Awards, sponsored by AT&T, are accomplished innovators, leaders and technologists from a variety of fields and practices. They have managed corporations, startups and universities in telecom, medtech, nanotech and more. And they're ready to shine the spotlight on the best and the brightest in North Texas technology. See a profile of each of the judges.More

3 strategies for representing your brand to the media
by MTBC member M/C/C
Your brand image matters, whether you're a part of an established business or in the beginning phases of a startup company. Your image is what attracts employees and can either make or break your future as a company.More

Shaunna Black wins ATW Lifetime Achievement Award
MTBC
Shaunna Black, past MTBC board member, pioneer in MTBC's Talent/STEM initiative, and Tech Titans Community Hero Award winner, has been honored by MTBC member Alliance of Technology and Women with their annual Lifetime Achievement Award.More

Detecting human life with remote technology
Flinders University via Phys.org
Flinders engineering students Laith Al-Shimaysawee and Ali Al-Dabbagh have developed ground-breaking new technology for detecting human life using remote cameras. More

Tiny robots pull objects up to 2,000 times their own weight
New Scientist via The Verge
Engineers from Stanford University have created miniature robots named MicroTugs capable of pulling and lifting objects more than 100 times their own weight. The strongest of the bots weighs just 12 grams but can pull objects 2,000 times heavier than itself, reports the New Scientist. This is the equivalent of a human dragging a blue whale, says David Christensen, an engineer from the lab that created the robots.More

Supermodels join drive for women to embrace coding
The Guardian
What is it about models and coding? American supermodel and coding advocate Karlie Kloss has joined a growing list of high-profile female stars urging young women to take up coding, reflecting a determination to shake up the disproportionately male world of coders and tech enthusiasts.More

The unfortunate growth sector: Cybersecurity
Forbes
In 2012, a computer virus known as Shamoon wiped the hard drives on tens of thousands of computers belonging to Saudi Aramaco, Saudi Arabia's oil and gas behemoth, and left a burning American flag on screens of the infected devices. It's widely believed that attack was carried out by Iran as retaliation for the 2010 destruction of Iranian nuclear centrifuges by a computer program known as Stuxnet.More

Wireless charging gets universal antenna
EE Times
Officials at NuCurrent believe the company's 50 patents in areas such as how to circumvent the skin effect will help them plug into success in the market for multimode wireless charging.More

$117 billion market for Internet of Things in healthcare by 2020
Forbes
According to a new report from MarketResearch.com, the healthcare Internet of Things market segment is poised to hit $117 billion by 2020. Depending on the company talking about it, you will hear different terms: Internet of Things, Internet of Everything or the Industrial Internet. But the combined IoT market adds up to be much larger than $117 billion.More

Technology for using large-screen virtual desktops on existing network infrastructure
Fujitsu via Phys.org
Fujitsu Laboratories recently announced the development of technology that allows for virtual desktops with larger screens, without upgrading existing network infrastructure. Virtual desktops are being introduced to the factory floor as part of a change of work styles for development and production operations. Demands for larger screens in order to improve the operability of computer support for designing and analyzing increasingly complex products through computer-aided design and computer-aided engineering are rising, and there is a need for more efficient transmission technologies for sending those bigger screen images over the network. More

What's Iron Man's suit made of? The science behind the Avengers
CNET
Why is Iron Man's suit so sturdy? How do Captain America and Black Widow rapidly heal from injuries? A video from the American Chemical Society looks at the science behind the Avengers.More

New helmet technology helping patients tackle baldness
Fox News
Both men and women have utilized many resources to combat baldness, but now a former NASA scientist is using lasers to regrow hair. Dr. Tamim Hamid is the CEO and inventor of Theradome, a helmet that he said "uses 80 cold lasers to promote hair growth by stimulating the base of the hair follicle."More