Tech Insights
Jul. 9, 2014

Can your face reveal how long you'll live? New technology may provide the answer
The Washington Post
Imagine that an insurance underwriter comes to your house and, along with noting your weight and blood pressure, snaps a photo of your face. And that those wrinkles, mottled spots and saggy parts, when fed into a computer, could estimate how long you will live. Facial recognition technology, long used to search for criminals and to guess how a missing child might look as an adult, may soon become personal. A group of scientists is working on a system that would analyze an individual's prospects based on how his or her face has aged.More

New shape of UTDesign program reflects growing company support
The University of Texas at Dallas
Growing support for the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science's award-winning senior design program is paying off for both its students and its corporate sponsors. Under the guidance of faculty advisors, engineering and computer science students in the UTDesign program are helping partner companies create solutions to projects and giving them full ownership of the results.More

How Big Data and the Internet Of Things will change the postal service
Forbes
Do you possess "expertise and critical knowledge of the Internet of Things, data strategy and analytics, and the Postal Service's operations, infrastructure, products and services"? You might try and send your proposals to the U.S. Postal Service, which is looking for a supplier to help it make its "Internet of Postal Things Project" real. More

The 'Internet of Things' may not always need an internet connection
Quartz
The "Internet of Things" is one of those odd phrases that can mean many things and nothing at the same time. On one hand, it describes a future that is rapidly becoming the present, with all sorts of objects — from televisions and watches to cups and streetlights — able to connect to the Internet. On the other hand, it is used a marketing tactic by chip-makers and networking companies eager to sell their wares. Between 26 and 50 million "things" will be connected to the Internet by 2020, according to various forecasts. But not all of those things need an Internet connection, points out Davor Sutija, who runs Thinfilm, a Norwegian company working in the field of printable electronics. More

Does the Internet of Things need its own network?
Forbes
As billions of Bluetooth-enabled mattresses, toothbrushes, dog collars, soccer balls — you name it — join the Internet of Things, the networks that bind them to smartphones, tablets and other devices inevitably will become crowded, leaving current Internet capacity inadequate to handle the influx. French Internet service provider Sigfox says the solution is to build a separate network specifically for "things."More

Big push this month for more widespread cybersecurity effort
San Francisco Chronicle
In an 11-story office building in the Washington suburbs, hundreds of U.S. cybersecurity analysts work around the clock to foil hackers. Possible breaches of government networks show up as red flashes on screens that line the walls. Something big is coming, some of the analysts say. They're speaking not of any imminent hack, but of what they see as a chance to expand their influence. So far, their 5-year-old National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center has largely occupied itself monitoring threats to government networks. Now, with backing on Capitol Hill, it is ready to bolster its role as an antihacking coordinator between banks, utilities and other companies operating the networks that millions of Americans use daily.More

Children are our 3-D printing future
Inside3DP
With governments across the globe investing millions into universities, individual entrepreneurs backing school projects and colleges putting forward their own challenges, 3-D printing is certainly being pushed towards the younger sections of our society. But are we right to invest so much money and time into children, or should we be focusing on new start-ups and individuals that could do with our help now?More

Robots' best teachers are other robots (in cloud networks)
Bloomberg Businessweek
Earlier this year, a vaguely humanoid robot served juice to a researcher lying on a hospital bed. The robot then uploaded its memory of the experience to a system of cloud servers, essentially a shared global brain. When the next juice-serving robot came along, it had already downloaded the memory and knew where to find the juice and how to get to the bed. The phenomenon of robots teaching one another is known as transfer learning, and it could prove increasingly useful as more people begin to rely on robots for medical care and other services.More

US pushes China to give ground on technology trade deal
The Times of India
The U.S. has urged China to give ground on a deal to eliminate duties on billions of dollars of technology products and said it would use upcoming talks in Beijing to push to restart negotiations. The U.S. and Europe have blamed China, the world's biggest exporter of IT products, for derailing talks on a pact on technology trade by asking for too many exemptions. More

New SMS worm targets Android devices
InfoWorld
A rare Android worm that propagates itself to other users via links in text messages has been discovered by security researchers. Once installed on a device, the malware, which was dubbed Selfmite, sends a text messages to 20 contacts from the device owner's address book. Most malware programs for Android are Trojan apps with no self-propagation mechanisms that get distributed from non-official app stores.More

Futuristic drive: Step inside a 3-D printed car
CNN
It seats two people, has a sleek retractable roof and runs on electric power. And its body can be 3-D printed in a single piece. Meet the Strati, the concept vehicle that was selected from more than 200 entries as the winner of the 3D Printed Car Design Challenge — back in mid-April, U.S.-based company Local Motors invited designers from around the world to submit their concepts for a car that can be manufactured using 3-D printing.More

4 steps to build a better mobile business
InformationWeek
Anybody can make an app. And that's the problem. People in companies set out to build apps, only to realize they're not building an app that helps the company be more successful. The key is to build an app that's connected in a meaningful way to the systems that power the business. It takes a disciplined, four-step approach called the IDEA cycle.More

8 tips for getting your IT career back on track
InfoWorld
Most of us are trying get ahead in this world, but occasionally we find ourselves in the unenviable career rut. Maybe you realize your current position doesn't align with your long-term goals. Perhaps you received a poor performance review, or were passed over for promotion, and feel like your career has gone off the road. Now what? You've got to get your career back on track — and fast.More

The state of women in technology: 15 data points you should know
TechRepublic
By 2020, there will be 1.4 million computer science jobs available in the U.S. according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and we need to play catch-up to fill them all. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 68 percent of women enroll in college (compared to 63 percent of men), and women increasingly outnumber men in college graduation rates. Yet women still make up only a quarter of the tech industry workforce. Here are 15 important data points you should know, including a few rays of sunlight. More

US pushes China to give ground on technology trade deal
The Times of India
The U.S. has urged China to give ground on a deal to eliminate duties on billions of dollars of technology products and said it would use upcoming talks in Beijing to push to restart negotiations. The U.S. and Europe have blamed China, the world's biggest exporter of IT products, for derailing talks on a pact on technology trade by asking for too many exemptions. More