Tech Insights
Oct. 16, 2013

Final call for MTBC Board nominations
MTBC
The MTBC Nominating Committee is now accepting nominations to the board of directors for terms beginning Jan. 1. Nominees must be members of the MTBC in good standing. Nominations will be accepted by fax 972-792-2825, email Molly Ulmer or mail to 411 Belle Grove, Richardson, Texas 75080 and should be addressed to the MTBC Nominating Committee. Nominations must be received at the MTBC office by 5 p.m., Oct. 20.More

Do smartphone sensors present security risk?
InformationWeek
Privacy alert: Every smartphone's sensors record data in slightly different ways, and those differences are substantial enough to be measured and used to identify the device. That warning comes via security researcher Hristo Bojinov, a computer science Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University who's been working with a team of researchers to test whether the sensors inside smartphones might pose a privacy risk, the San Francisco Chronicle first reported.More

Is there a cybersecurity workforce crisis?
FCW
The numbers are startling: The U.S. Cyber Command seeks 5,000 cybersecurity pros. The federal government will need 10,000 cybersecurity experts in the near future. Even the Department of Homeland Security's comparatively small yet urgent demand for 600 new cybersecurity employees is dizzying once the logistics are considered. Where are agencies going to find all those people?More

3-D printers' could change our economy and our lives
Michigan Technological University via Phys.org
"When you produce something yourself instead of purchasing it, that changes your relationship to it," says Chelsea Schelly, assistant professor of social sciences. She's discussing the current popular trend of 3-D printing. "You are empowered by it." That principle might sound simple, but its ramifications can be wide ranging, especially for middle and high school educators.More

5 army tech innovations to watch
InformationWeek
From more powerful body armor to better tasting food, these technologies in development aim to improve the life and safety of military service members.More

Fujitsu's factory farm: Can cloud computing displace GMOs?
Forbes
Think of this as an industrial plant for plants. Fujitsu is in the midst of turning a mothballed semiconductor fab in Aizu Wakamatsu, Japan, into a facility to grow low-potassium vegetables, said company representatives at Ceatec, a technology conference that recently took place in Chiba, Japan. More

Dallas startup to roll out communications device for retailers
Dallas Business Journal
A Dallas startup is launching a new product that aims to help retailers manage their employees more effectively. Theatro has been working with a local national retailer to develop the wearable device that leverages the cloud for communications services and analytics. It plans to roll out its software to 75 stores within the chain by mid-2014.More

5 army tech innovations to watch
InformationWeek
From more powerful body armor to better tasting food, these technologies in development aim to improve the life and safety of military service members.More

The health care sector will invest $5.4 billion in cloud computing by 2017
CloudTimes
Market researchers at MarketsandMarkets assume that the health care industry will invest $5.4 billion in cloud computing by 2017.More

Federal officials: Shutdown heightens cybersecurity risks
InformationWeek
Senior federal officials are voicing concern that the partial shutdown and the furlough of thousands of cybersecurity and intelligence specialists are an open invitation to hackers to exploit security vulnerabilities. More

How quantum computers and machine learning will revolutionize big data
Wired
When subatomic particles smash together at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland, they create showers of new particles whose signatures are recorded by four detectors. The LHC captures 5 trillion bits of data — more information than all of the world's libraries combined — every second. More

Forget big data: The future is small data, and Facebook just bought it
Quartz
Recently, Onavo, an Israeli startup, announced it was being acquired by Facebook. Onavo’s flagship product is a data compressor. When you browse a website or use an app on your phone, Onavo routes the traffic through its servers, where it compresses and optimizes the data before sending it on to the phone. Call it small data. More

Predicting the future could improve remote control of space robots
Wired
A new system could make space exploration robots faster and more efficient by predicting where they will be in the very near future. The engineers behind the program hope to overcome a particular snarl affecting our probes out in the solar system: that pesky delay caused by the speed of light.More

Drone driver licenses? How to make flying robots safe for American skies
NBC News
Hobbyist drone pilots will tell you that small drones are notoriously temperamental and accident-prone. Community discussion forums are filled with crash-related queries, and YouTube documents ample evidence of camera-carrying quadcopters or hexacopters getting tangled up in trees and toppling to the ground. More

5 signs you're expecting more from employees than they can give
Entrepreneur
Don't you just hate all those entitled people in the workplace today? No, not employees but managers and leaders: entrepreneurs and business owners who have unrealistic expectations about what they deserve, stressing employees out with their entitlement mindset. Here are five entitled leader traps to avoid when running your own business.More

The 9 biggest money wasters in your business
American Express OPEN Forum
Do you know what the money traps are in your business? You'll be surprised. These nine are causing you to lose a lot of money. More