Tech Insights
Dec. 18, 2013

Infographic: The most popular toys of the past 50 years
Fast Company
With parents causing so much carnage in pursuit of that elusive PlayStation 4 on Black Friday — so much so that the day is under threat of being rechristened "Bloody Friday" — it's only natural to wonder what has happened to Christmas. And when, for the record, did kids stop wanting toys under the tree? Pretty recently, as this infographic by Abby Ryan Designs makes clear.More

Wireless data use headed to 1 gigabyte per person per day
Dallas Business Journal
Nokia Solutions and Networks envisions a day in the not-too-distant future when wireless users will consume 1 gigabyte of data per person per day. For perspective, relatively heavy users today consume about a gigabyte per month.More

This is the year of the makers
TechCrunch
John Biggs, former editor-in-chief of Gizmodo, writes: "We are at a turning point in terms of gadget manufacturing. The heavy hitters in hardware — the Sonys, the Samsungs, the LGs — are stuck in the mire of slow innovation. We haven't heard much out of that camp this year — they're keeping CES plans under wraps — but I suspect we’ll see a few big TVs and some thin laptops and a nice fridge or two and little else. The real innovation is happening far out in the periphery where hardware is an extension of software and smart devices are now the fastest moving consumer goods."More

Big bang disruption: The 'Internet of Things' takes off, gradually and then suddenly
Forbes
Fixed is better than broken. And it can be cheaper too. That's why it's good that machines can now talk to each other to say when a part is failing and can be replaced before catastrophe strikes. Running the air conditioning exactly how and when you want it is also better; and cheaper too.More

Tech companies take step toward the 'Internet of Things'
NPR
Several companies have made what some see as a small step toward TVs, locks and household appliances all talking to each other. As an example, imagine someone trying to break into your house. A smart lock on the door would trigger flashing lights and a camera. The camera would snap pictures of the intruder and send it to the TV you're watching elsewhere in the house. This vision of a connected home, sometimes referred to as the "Internet of Things," is expected to keep growing. More

Tech bubble is stable for cybersecurity companies
U.S. News & World Report
Social media companies are enjoying a bubble of prosperity as stocks reach new highs and venture capitalists seek new investments, but that growth will be more stable for cybersecurity services, which have an easier time proving their value. More

Obama meets with tech CEOs amid NSA concerns
WFAA-TV
President Barack Obama recently met with executives from companies such as Google Twitter, Apple and other leading tech companies to discuss federal issues, including the troubled healthcare website and government surveillance. More

Obama meets with tech CEOs amid NSA concerns
WFAA-TV
President Barack Obama recently met with executives from companies such as Google Twitter, Apple and other leading tech companies to discuss federal issues, including the troubled healthcare website and government surveillance. More

Forget the 'Internet of Things' — The future is smart dust
Fast Company
To some people the "Internet of Things" is yesterday's buzz topic. The future is even more ubiquity. It's something called smart dust.More

Do smart devices need regulation? FTC examines 'Internet of Things'
Forbes
The Federal Trade Commission recently hosted a public workshop examining the emerging role of connected technology and the ramifications for user privacy and data security.More

3 surefire ways to screw up a cloud deployment
InfoWorld
There are cloud projects that tank, and those that fail on to an epic degree. The causes can usually be traced back to simple issues that are easily corrected. Unfortunately, cloud success stories are not as common as they should be. To help change that balance, address these cloud issues to increase your odds of success.More

The 5 best and worst things about working from home
Fast Company
For those trapped in a cubicle or an open office, working from home may sound like pajama-clad heaven. But there are two sides to every coin. Here are the trials and triumphs of the home office — in your own words.More

CIOs driving critical change in an industry ripe for disruption
InformationWeek
Higher education must change. There's the obvious reason of tuition rising far faster than inflation and wages, raising student debt burdens and pricing out would-be students. But students also are changing — they're demanding more mobility, remote learning options and classrooms that combine face-to-face and digital teaching. Recognizing the critical need for IT leaders to anticipate and respond to these changes, InformationWeek chose five leading higher education CIOs as its 2013 Chiefs of the Year.More