NACBA Weekly Update
Jul. 3, 2014

The Hobby Lobby decision
National Catholic Reporter
The Hobby Lobby decision was greeted by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and others as a great victory for religious freedom, a defeat for the forces of secularism in the "war on religion." Women’s groups filled email boxes across the land with fundraising appeals, adding the Hobby Lobby decision to their list of grievances in the purported "war on women."More

The folly of fear
The Christian Century
When the church Susan M. Reiser was serving was contemplating a new vision for organizing itself, especially its governance, she heard a certain question posed a number of times that asked whether or not other churches had tried such a system. How had it worked? How did people like it? Why does it matter so much to church folk that we do something or try something new only because someone else has done it? Our fearfulness when it comes to engaging in something new is certainly a big part of our problem in the old mainline.More

2 key points to help overcome the online giving hurdle
Church Tech Today
In meetings with pastors, administrators and elder boards about the impact that online giving can have in their churches, there is one question that comes up more frequently than any other: "Why should we be paying 1 – 3 percent in processing fees for donations we could be getting for free?" This is a valid and important question, but "donations we could be getting for free" misses two key points.More

The No. 1 reason for decline in church attendance
Church Central
Few people will argue that church attendance in many churches in America is declining. Most of us have ideas about this development. Many suggest that our nation is shifting away from its Christian roots. Thus, churches are declining as a smaller proportion of our country follows Christ. Certainly attendance declines are related to massive cultural shifts in our nation, but Thom Rainer suggests that one reason for declines has a greater impact than others.More

The new rules of HR: How to hire better talent
By Scott Steinberg
Finding job applicants with the right skills can be challenging under any circumstances, let alone rapidly-shifting business environments such as those we find ourselves operating in at present. Doubly so, say a rising tide of executive directors and boards, as the talents and capabilities needed to succeed tomorrow will be vastly different from those needed today.More

Getting organized
Faith & Leadership
Strategic choices begin with answers to questions of why, where, who and how and culminate in selecting the capacities and management systems to develop and strengthen. It seems obvious that good strategy depends on specific talent in the ministry and a practical way of organizing, but somehow we often spend too much or too little time on these later strategic choices.More

Mystery shoppers rate church size
Christianity Today
Small churches are friendlier, while large churches have better publicity and higher sermon quality, according to the results of a church marketing project that uses unchurched mystery guests to rate church programs and atmospheres. Local community members who don't usually attend church visited more than 4,000 churches over six years and rated them on 16 categories, from community awareness, greetings, and music to diversity and youth ministry programs.More

Florida church dedicates service to keeping LeBron James in Miami
The Root
A group of fans desperate for James to continue his career with the Miami Heat created a Twitter account to get the four-time NBA Most Valuable Player to keep his talents in South Beach, according to the Bleacher Report. The account asks fans to tweet a photo of themselves wearing a headband LeBron is notorious for wearing while playing. Participants took the campaign to another level when congregants and clergy of Holy Spirit Episcopalian Church in West Palm Beach wore headbands and dedicated part of their service to "King James."More

Texting up despite 'giving preference gap'
The NonProfit Times
Donors who give to charity via text are becoming more comfortable and the avenue is becoming their preferred method of giving, if the results of a recent survey are any indication. For the first time since the Text Donation Study began in 2012, text donors chose text giving as their most preferred method of making a donation, according to the 2014 edition, released by The mGive Foundation in Denver.More

Survey claims most Americans believe religion is the answer to problems
Christian Headlines
According to a recent study, the majority of Americans believe that religion can answer their problems. A Gallup poll asked Americans if religion can solve life's obstacles and 57 percent answered yes. While this is a positive response, the statistics are still in decline from previous years.More

Mystery shoppers rate church size
Christianity Today
Small churches are friendlier, while large churches have better publicity and higher sermon quality, according to the results of a church marketing project that uses unchurched mystery guests to rate church programs and atmospheres. Local community members who don't usually attend church visited more than 4,000 churches over six years and rated them on 16 categories, from community awareness, greetings, and music to diversity and youth ministry programs.More

4 keys to planning for church health
Church Central
Based on both research and anecdotal evidence, Thom Rainer estimates that 9 out of every 10 churches in America are growing at a slower pace than their community — if they are growing at all. That is not a good sign for the church in America. Through the feedback received in recent years, it has become overwhelmingly evident that the spiritual health of churches and pastors is of great concern. More

5 things church volunteers need to hear you say
By Deborah Wipf
Volunteers who are dedicated, trustworthy and willing to work hard are incredible assets to any church. If your current volunteer program is struggling, you might be surprised at how many people would be willing to serve if they were offered the chance. Paying closer attention to how and what you communicate just might be the catalyst you need to grow your volunteer team. Here are five things volunteers need to hear you say.More

Reaching back to move forward
Faith & Leadership
Stephanie Croom, associate director of formation for ministry at Western Theological Seminary brought up the concept of Sankofa — meaning "to reach back and get it" — during a discussion of traditioned innovation. Traditioned innovation is a biblical way of leading that integrates the transformative work of Christ into our ongoing identity as the people of God rooted in biblical Israel's calling. Like Sankofa, it is a way of reaching back into the past to identify what matters most, in order to bring it with us into the future.More

5 times you may need to micromanage your team
Ron Edmondson
There are times where more micro-management may be needed by senior leadership. More coaching, encouraging or correction may be needed for a season. Here are five times to consider some micromanagement.More

Everything you need to know about giving negative feedback
Harvard Business Review
There's a lot of conflicting advice out there on giving corrective feedback. If you really need to criticize someone's work, how should you do it? Digging into HBR's archives, here is the best, research- and experience-based advice on what to do, and what to avoid.More

4 essential risks CEOs must take to grow their business
ChiefExecutive.net
All of business life is fraught with uncertainty. You are faced with risks every day; they are unavoidable. However, by evaluating each risk and placing it into one of the following categories, you will better understand how to address them. More