This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit January 20, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!

 





How principals are preparing for Common Core
eSchool News
Principals are more optimistic than last year about changes in learning standards and technology taking place in their schools, according to the fourth annual Principals' Assessment of Public Education, conducted by educational marketing data firm MCH Strategic Data and edWeb.net. Designed to track trends within K-12 schools, the assessment compiled survey responses from more than 500 principals in elementary, middle and high schools across the country. The results provide a snapshot of the current state of schools as they implement Common Core and college and career readiness standards, develop student data privacy policies and establish a better understanding of what constitutes 21st century learning.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords PRINCIPALS.




Next stop, ubiquity? The benefits of Wi-Fi on wheels
EdTech Magazine
The evolution of technology in education has conjured its share of promising scenarios for K-12 schools. The Internet brought talk of the connected classroom. Notebooks and tablets sparked a shift toward mobile computing, and the bring-your-own-device movement opened the possibility of a 24/7 learning environment, where new opportunities would be forever at students' fingertips.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Paralinguistic concerns for ESL instructors
By: Douglas Magrath
Language is the first concern in teaching communicative competence. Grammar, pronunciation, listening comprehension and speech are all vital skills needed by ESL learners. However, there are other elements that may not be so apparent that are part of the overall interrelated system. The listeners — both learners and native speakers — may get the wrong impressions because the paralinguistic features of language can cause interference, so interest in paralinguistic functions has been increasing.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Life lessons light up science education
District Administration Magazine
From designing more creative and flexible science classrooms to developing community service projects that engage girls in STEM, this year's National Science Teachers Association conference in March is all about K-12 students connecting learning to the real world. Implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards and an accompanying push for hands-on learning is bringing new ways to think about integrating science — and scientific thinking — into everyday experiences.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Energy and calm: Brain breaks and focused-attention practices
Edutopia
When presented with new material, standards and complicated topics, we need to be focused and calm as we approach our assignments. We can use brain breaks and focused-attention practices to positively impact our emotional states and learning. They refocus our neural circuitry with either stimulating or quieting practices that generate increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, where problem solving and emotional regulation occur.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Download Intensive Test Prep at NO CHARGE

Prepare your students for the upcoming 2015 state testing with Common Core Standards Plus Intensive Test Prep. Includes 10 weeks of ready-to-teach, 15 minute lessons that teach the heavily-weighted and tested standards.

Get started at no charge - download two weeks of lessons today!
 


A new kind of social anxiety in the classroom
The Atlantic
Stress about a meeting that is still a week away, handwringing before talking to the cashier in the grocery line, worrying about seeing an acquaintance on the street — for people with social anxiety disorder, even the simplest task can prove challenging. The symptoms of social anxiety often set in around adolescence, when people place a new emphasis on social interactions and their place in their peer groups. But some academics fear that greater access to technology could exacerbate social anxiety among teens, particularly as smartphones, tablets and computers become omnipresent in and out of the classroom.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Longer school days, school years: Somewhat helpful to boosting student learning, but amped-up teaching does more
The Oregonian
The Obama administration required low-performing schools that got federal money intended to spur a turnaround to add time to their school day or school year. Years into the effort, however, school leaders who accepted federal millions say the added teaching time was only moderately helpful. Stepped up teaching, often resulting from teachers being given more time to collaborate, yields a much bigger payoff, they report.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT
    1. WHICH ONE IS YOU?
       A. I have to push students through the basic language art skills.
       B. I have to teach what comes along even if students cannot understand it.
       C. I "Rescue" my students by using a structured and sequential approach that
           enhances any reading, spelling, penmanship, and composition curriculum
           including Common Core expectations.


Teachers who don't like their jobs miss millions of days of school each year
The Huffington Post
U.S. teachers who are unhappy with their jobs miss significantly more days of work than their happier peers, a new survey finds. A recent brief from Gallup looks at how teachers' level of engagement impacts their attendance. Last year, Gallup asked a group of over 6,500 full-time K-12 schoolteachers questions about their happiness at work to determine how engaged they felt with their jobs. The answers were used to classify teachers as engaged, not engaged or actively disengaged. Engaged teachers were committed to their work, while not engaged teachers felt emotionally disconnected from their jobs and actively disengaged teachers felt completely unhappy on a day-to-day basis.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Warning signs for a learning disability: Short attention span, plus 7 others
Medical Daily
Nearly one in 10 American children under the age of 18 has some type of learning disability — a disorder that affects a child's ability to understand or use language, make mathematical calculations, maintain attention, and even coordinate body movements. Learning disabilities arise from neurological differences in brain structure and function. These differences, which often run in families, affect a person's ability to receive, store, process, retrieve or communicate information.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Special Discount for NAESP Members!

As a member of NAESP, you could qualify for a special discount on car insurance with GEICO. Simply go online or call 1-800-368-2734, to complete a simple, no-obligation rate quote. Don’t forget to mention your NAESP membership to see how much you could save with your special member discount.
 


Study: Suspensions harm 'well-behaved' kids
EdSource
It's a belief repeated every day by teachers, principals and parents of rule-abiding children: Suspending disruptive students will allow the rest of the class to settle down and learn. But a new, large study calls this rationale into question. The study is believed to be the first to look closely at the academic performance of individual students who have never been suspended, but who attend schools where others are suspended. After tracking nearly 17,000 students over three years, two Midwestern researchers found that high rates of school suspensions harmed math and reading scores for non-suspended students.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Kids may snack on junk food on the ride home from school
Reuters
Kids who ride home from school — whether in a car or on a bus — eat more snacks and candy during that window of opportunity than those who get home under their own steam, according to a new U.S. study. The researchers thought that kids who walk or bike to and from school might have more chances to buy junk foods along the way, but found it was the "passive commuters" who rode to or from school that ate more snacks. Dr. Kristine Madsen at the University of California, Berkley School of Public Health, who led the study of fourth- and fifth-graders, said her team was glad to find that the "active commuters" were not buying more junk food on their way home.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Bilingualism changes kids' beliefs about the world
PsychCentral
Bilingualism in the preschool years can significantly alter a child's beliefs about the world, according to a new study by Concordia University. In contrast to their monolingual peers, children exposed to more than one language after age three believe that a person's psychological attributes are the result of experience rather than something they are born with. For the study, published in the journal Developmental Science, the researchers tested a total of 48 5- and 6-year-olds.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamental 5 - A Kindle Best Seller

Discover the revolutionary system of daily teacher actions that are transforming 1000's
of classrooms across
the nation. Order now on Amazon.com
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the NAESP eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469.420.2629.
MORE


A new study reveals much about how parents really choose schools
NPR
The charter school movement is built on the premise that increased competition among schools will sort the wheat from the chaff. It seems self-evident that parents, empowered by choice, will vote with their feet for academically stronger schools. As the argument goes, the overall effect should be to improve equity as well: Lower-income parents won't have to send their kids to an under-resourced and underperforming school just because it is the closest one to them geographically.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Majority of US public school students are in poverty
The Washington Post
For the first time in at least 50 years, a majority of U.S. public school students come from low-income families, according to a new analysis of 2013 federal data, a statistic that has profound implications for the nation. The Southern Education Foundation reports that 51 percent of students in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade were eligible under the federal program for free and reduced-price lunches in the 2012-2013 school year. The lunch program is a rough proxy for poverty, but the explosion in the number of needy children in the nation’s public classrooms is a recent phenomenon that has been gaining attention among educators, public officials and researchers.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Battle lines drawn on annual testing in ESEA renewal
Education Week
Thirteen years after mandating high-stakes testing, Congress is kicking off its most serious attempt yet to update the Elementary and Secondary Education Act with partisan wrangling over whether to ditch the law's signature schedule of annual assessments. But a closer look shows that, behind the scenes, the politics aren't so cut-and-dried. At center stage, it's largely been Democrats, especially U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, defending the yearly testing schedule in the current law, the No Child Left Behind Act.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What is bullying? Why achieving a clarity of definition is so important for principals (District Administration Magazine)
Why schools should pay more attention to students' grit and self-control (The Huffington Post)
6 education stories to watch in 2015 (NPR)
Out of tragedy, a protective glass for schools (The New York Times)
Can schools cultivate a student's ability to think differently? (MindShift)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Cooking up a better education reform plan
The Hill (commentary)
President Barack Obama's State of the Union address is coming up, but he has already unveiled a major section of the speech: education reform. But while he is asking the right questions on education, his plan to provide free tuition for a community college is the wrong answer. What does the head of a culinary arts school know about this policy issue? More than you might think.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Sandy Hook families sue Newtown: Can lawsuit prompt security improvements?
The Christian Science Monitor
Families of two victims in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting have filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the town of Newtown, Conn., and its board of education, alleging security measures at the school weren't adequate. The two families' motivation was solely to improve school security for future students in the Newtown school district, Donald Papcsy, an attorney for the families, said in a statement. For years schools have been trying to find ways to become more safe and prevent the next shooting, but the task is easier said than done, experts say, especially in a way that doesn't scare young students or disrupt the learning environment.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




NAESP members to help build school in the Dominican Republic
NAESP
The school will be built for the children and families in a small, mountainous farming community. Lifetouch, the leading national provider of school and family photography, organized this trip and invited school administrators, principals, educators and PTA members throughout North America to work alongside Lifetouch volunteers and Dominican nationals to build the school.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Yes, elementary students can use Socratic Circles
NAESP
Principal Dondi Frisinger writes: "If you've heard about Socratic Circles as a teaching strategy, you probably think it's best used at the secondary level. But at my school, Walker Elementary in Springdale, Arkansas, we've found Socratic Routines/Circles to be beneficial for our kindergarten through fifth-grade students."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
Jan. 13, 2015
Jan. 9, 2015
Jan. 6, 2015
Jan. 2, 2015



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063