This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit January 23, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!

 





Top 5 education trends for 2015
By: Archita Datta Majumdar
2015 is going to be an exciting year for learning, across all segments. Experts predict this will primarily be due to the mind-blowing convergence between learning habits and technology use. Changes and development in technology will define the way we learn in future as the "ed tech" market is steadily growing — it's slated to become a $19 billion industry by 2018. A look at some key trends in the news will perhaps show where we are headed and how we should prepare our students for the future.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Inside the brain of a struggling reader
District Administration Magazine
While home environment, access to books, and social and economic factors all play a part in children's literacy development, brain differences also play a crucial role. Left-brain activity in struggling readers is often underconnected — like two city suburbs that have only side streets for access. This part of the brain helps readers make the connection between letters and sounds, or phonemes — called "phonological processing."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




How special educators can handle testing season
By: Pamela Hill
In numerous schools, testing season is just beginning. Countless public schools administer districtwide assessments three times a year, and they administer federally-mandated yearly statewide testing during the spring season. Consequently, beginning in January and continuing until May, many students will engage in two districtwide assessments and one statewide assessment. For students with learning disabilities, this can be a time of frustration or a time of confidence.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


How can your librarian help bolster brain-based teaching practices?
MindShift
Inquiry-based learning has been around in education circles for a long time, but many teachers and schools gradually moved away from it during the heyday of No Child Left Behind. The pendulum is beginning to swing back towards an inquiry-based approach to instruction thanks to standards such as Common Core State Standards for math and English Language Arts, the Next Generation Science Standards and the College, Career and Civic Life Framework for Social Studies State Standards. Transitioning to this style of teaching requires students to take a more active role and asks teachers to step back into a supportive position. It can be a tough transition for many students and their teachers, but turning to the school librarian for support could make the transition a little easier.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


4 best practices in implementing game-based learning
Edutopia
Are you seeking a high-engagement makeover for some content you're required to teach? Do you need an organizational structure for individually-paced hybrid learning? Gamification might be just what you are looking for. Here are some truths about gamification and some tips for success.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Download Intensive Test Prep at NO CHARGE

Prepare your students for the upcoming 2015 state testing with Common Core Standards Plus Intensive Test Prep. Includes 10 weeks of ready-to-teach, 15 minute lessons that teach the heavily-weighted and tested standards.

Get started at no charge - download two weeks of lessons today!
 


Art therapy may help kids with behavior problems
Reuters
School-based art therapy in the U.K. is helping troubled kids get back on track, a new study suggests. Begun in 2002, The Art Room program is aimed at children between the ages of 5 and 16 who have been identified by their teachers as needing emotional and behavioral support. Currently there are nine Art Room programs in U.K. schools. More than 10,000 children have been through the Art Room program since it started.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


STEM 2015: Are we losing our focus?
MiddleWeb (commentary)
Anne Jolly began her career as a lab scientist, caught the science teaching bug and was recognized as an Alabama Teacher of the Year during her years as a middle grades science teacher. Today, she works with teacher teams in schools across the Southeast to help them take control of their own professional learning. "My fingers are crossed for 2015 as the best STEM year ever! I've been looking around to see what directions STEM programs seem to be taking this year. At first glance, it appears that deciding what a STEM program should look like is an ongoing conundrum for the K-12 education world."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT
    1. WHICH ONE IS YOU?
       A. I have to push students through the basic language art skills.
       B. I have to teach what comes along even if students cannot understand it.
       C. I "Rescue" my students by using a structured and sequential approach that
           enhances any reading, spelling, penmanship, and composition curriculum
           including Common Core expectations.




For principals, continuous learning critical to career success
Education Week
The principal's job has been called both the most important in a school building and the loneliest, and the stress it places on individuals is illustrated by its rapid turnover rates, especially in high-poverty schools. School leadership experts say that robust and ongoing training can alleviate those issues and help keep principals on the job, but professional development for school leaders is often bypassed for other pressing needs such as teacher training. And the professional development that many principals do get is of questionable quality.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords PRINCIPALS.


Is Facebook the new school Web page?
EdTech Magazine
Why use Facebook for school-to-home communication? Your news feed may be littered with advertisements that are personalized to your perceived tastes in an all-too-creepy way. Facebook updates its privacy policies with as much frequency as NFL teams change their coaches. There is also the increased potential for misunderstandings when the wrong word or phrase is posted. Educators can avoid these issues by using only paper, email and a Web page to share school news and student learning.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Special Discount for NAESP Members!

As a member of NAESP, you could qualify for a special discount on car insurance with GEICO. Simply go online or call 1-800-368-2734, to complete a simple, no-obligation rate quote. Don’t forget to mention your NAESP membership to see how much you could save with your special member discount.
 


When ADHD isn't what it seems
The Atlantic
The number of kids who are diagnosed with ADHD these days is huge — and growing. Reported cases of the disorder have increased by 42 percent since 2003. But a new study suggests that some of these children might actually be suffering from a different condition that often goes undetected. Most of the referrals that pediatrician Ira Chasnoff gets at his clinic at the Children's Research Triangle in Chicago are for behavioral issues. He and his team analyzed a sample of 156 foster children who had been referred to his clinic and found that 81 percent of them had fetal alcohol spectrum disorders that had not previously been detected by a physician. The most common reason they had been referred to Chasnoff was ADHD.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The business of waste management
District Administration Magazine
One student generates about five pounds of waste in 180 days from simply drinking a carton of milk each day of the school year, according to the Carton Council, a national industry-sponsored recycling organization. Add in glue bottles, old test papers and leftover lunch, and it's no wonder schools are looking for ways to reduce both the amount of waste filling trash bins and the money spent to have it hauled away. School waste reduction programs are getting a boost from environmental groups and also from state and municipal laws mandating recycling and composting. Schools also are cutting costs by buying less of the items most often wasted, thus reducing the need for trash disposal. Some districts are even making money from recycling.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Helping the poor in education: The power of a simple nudge
The New York Times
There are enormous inequalities in education in the United States. A child born into a poor family has only a 9 percent chance of getting a college degree, but the odds are 54 percent for a child in a high-income family. These gaps open early, with poor children less prepared than their kindergarten classmates. How can we close these gaps? Contentious, ambitious reforms of the education system crowd the headlines: the Common Core, the elimination of teacher tenure, charter schools.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


5 productivity skills every educator must have
THE Journal
Educators literally have a "world of knowledge and resources" at their fingertips, as one director of curriculum and instructional technology declared in response to THE Journal's national survey. "What better way to learn about the situation in Syria than tweeting #Syria and receiving a tweet from someone there?" But guiding your students in learning new concepts, gaining insights and building their skills requires you to be comfortable with the technologies that can make all of that happen.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamental 5 - A Kindle Best Seller

Discover the revolutionary system of daily teacher actions that are transforming 1000's
of classrooms across
the nation. Order now on Amazon.com
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the NAESP eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469.420.2629.
MORE




What the new Common Core tests are — and aren't
The Washington Post
At a Senate education committee hearing on how the No Child Left Behind law should be rewritten, the subject quickly turned to standardized testing and whether the federal government should maintain NCLB's annual testing mandate. Witnesses and legislators talked about the amount of time students are tested, the stakes tied to the scores for students and teachers, and the quality of the tests. Tom Boasberg, superintendent of Denver Public Schools, praised new Common Core tests as being more sophisticated than earlier standardized testing.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The past, present and future of high-stakes testing
NPR
After a long stretch as the law of the land, annual standardized tests are being put to, well, the test. Recently, the Senate education committee held a hearing on the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind law and, specifically, on testing. The committee's chairman, Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., has released a draft bill offering a lot more leeway to states in designing their own assessment systems. But Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Sen. Patty Murray, the ranking Democrat on the committee, have dug in their heels to say that annual tests should remain mandatory.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Building a better school day
The Atlantic
In a union vote, Boston teachers approved the school district's plan to add 40 minutes to each instructional day for kids in grades kindergarten through eight at more than 50 campuses. It's a move experts say could help improve the quality of classroom teaching, boost student learning and yield long-term benefits to the wider community.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What is bullying? Why achieving a clarity of definition is so important for principals (District Administration Magazine)
Why schools should pay more attention to students' grit and self-control (The Huffington Post)
6 education stories to watch in 2015 (NPR)
Out of tragedy, a protective glass for schools (The New York Times)
Can schools cultivate a student's ability to think differently? (MindShift)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


School districts turn to teachers to lead
Education Week
Marilyn Boerke, the principal of Liberty Middle School in Camas, Wash., a district of 6,400 students along the Columbia River, applauds the district's philosophy that encourages teachers to serve in school leadership roles and actively creates opportunities for them to do so. Teachers are being recruited by the district — and many are stepping up — to run professional-development sessions, coach their peers, and help adapt curriculum to the Common Core standards.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




NAESP member meets with Secretary Duncan to launch principals at ED initiative
NAESP
Principal Kim Tierney from Denver Elementary School in Iowa recently joined a group of educators and met with U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and other senior Department of Education officials for a full day of learning and networking as part of the new Principals at ED effort to build communication.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Keep families informed with Report to Parents
NAESP
NAESP's Report to Parents is a monthly bulletin principals can share with parents and members of the school community. Each issue, published in both English and Spanish, offers tips to families on how to help their children at home and in school. The latest issue on setting goals can be found in the Report to Parents archives, along with previous editions.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
Jan. 16, 2015
Jan. 13, 2015
Jan. 9, 2015
Jan. 6, 2015



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063