This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Jan. 31, 2014

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement


Moving
To Success

Moving To Success embraces the belief that students who become competent movers and are knowledgeable regarding the health-related benefits of being physically active are more likely to lead a physically active lifestyle. 864-680-8471
MORE

 

Advertisement



Obama sells Race to Top, early-childhood education in State of the Union
The Hechinger Report
President Barack Obama placed education at the center of a broad strategy to bolster economic mobility and combat poverty — calling on Congress in his State of the Union speech to approve previously unveiled initiatives to expand preschool to more 4-year-olds, beef up job-training programs, and make post-secondary education more effective and accessible.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


Advertisement


5 pressing education issues you'll see in 2014
eSchool News
Although many states, districts and education leaders are beginning 2014 with a fresh perspective on education priorities, familiar issues–including funding, Common Core, and policy–are sure to emerge. The Council of State Governments released its annual top five education issues that legislators and education advocates will encounter this session.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




How do you learn best? Hands-on style tops survey results
Education Week
Score one for a hands-on style of learning, especially among young people. A new survey finds that getting physically involved in learning something trumps reading about it. The results paint a picture of a very different kind of learning than what is typically found in most classrooms.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


How do we help children identify as readers?
Psychology Today (commentary)
Jamie Zibulsky, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychology at Fairleigh Dickinson University, writes: "When I was a child, reading was my favorite pasttime. My parents, who are early risers, often reminisce about coming down the stairs of our house before the sun was up, tiptoeing because they thought no one else was awake, and finding me sitting on the floor of my room, reading stories to my stuffed animals. Each day, I read before school and in the evening. When a book was particularly gripping, I could be found reading in the hallways of my school, in the car while being coerced into doing errands, and under my covers with a flashlight. Clearly, I read for my own satisfaction."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword READING.


Report: Internationally, 250 million kids can't read
The Associated Press via ABC News
At least 250 million of the world's 650 million primary school age children are unable to read, write or do basic mathematics, according to a report commissioned by the U.N. education agency. The report found that 130 million are in primary school but have not achieved the minimum benchmarks for learning, and almost 120 million have spent little or no time in a classroom including 57 million youngsters who are not attending school. The independent research team that wrote the report for UNESCO, the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, calculated that the cost of 250 million children around the world not learning translates to a loss for governments of around $129 billion annually.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Need REAL Common Core Content?

We spent three years developing Common Core Standards Plus to be your Common Core solution. It includes ready-to-teach units with content at all four DOK levels, step-by-step instruction, performance tasks, rubrics, and more.

LEARN MORE -- WATCH A TWO-MINUTE VIDEO
 


Intensive small-group tutoring and counseling helps struggling students
The New York Times
By the time they reach eighth grade, according to federal tests, half of all African-American schoolboys have not mastered the most basic math skills that educators consider essential for their grade level. A new paper being released by the National Bureau of Economic Research suggests a promising approach for helping the most challenged students, who often arrive in high school several years behind their peers.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Building a better brain before children enter school
Education Week (commentary)
Peter DeWitt, a K-5 public school principal taking a leave of absence to be a trainer with Visible Learning, writes: "A few years back I was interviewing a literacy expert. The interview was for another publication, and through our conversation I asked how to connect with parents to help them see the importance of reading and talking with their children. He said, 'The parents that you need to get through to won't be the ones reading your article.' Although defeating, I knew he was right."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement




Recent polls: Do educators support the Common Core?
Edutopia
There is a lot of misinformation being spread about the Common Core. And some of it the public believes. The 2013 PDK/Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitudes Towards the Public Schools found that of those who had heard of the Common Core, 49 percent of respondents agree with the false statement that the initiative will create standards in all subjects, and 39 percent agree with the false statement that the Common Core was developed based on a blend of state standards.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


To inspire learning, architects reimagine learning spaces
MindShift
As K–12 schools refocus on team-based, interdisciplinary learning, they are moving away from standardized, teach-to-test programs that assume a one-size-fits-all approach to teaching. Instead, there is a growing awareness that students learn in a variety of ways, and the differences should be supported. The students often learn better by doing it themselves, so teachers are there to facilitate, not just to instruct. Technology is there as a tool and resource, not as a visual aid or talking head.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
Your Fundamental Solution for Improving Instruction

"The Fundamental 5 maximizes teacher effectiveness. It is the best instructional system I have ever observed." Robert Brezina, U.S. Academic Decathlon Past President.
Order now on Amazon.com
Advertisement
STANLEY Offers Comprehensive School Security

We’re partnering with educational facilities to develop solutions for safer schools. We offer intrusion detection, video, panic buttons, access control, monitoring, door hardware, and more.


Recess without rules
The Atlantic
There are no rules on the playground at Swanson Primary School in Auckland, New Zealand. Students are allowed to climb trees, ride skateboards, and play contact games. This relaxed approach to playtime started as a research experiment conducted by two local universities, but it went so well that the school opted to make the changes permanent. According to a recent article, the school "is actually seeing a drop in bullying, serious injuries and vandalism, while concentration levels in class are increasing."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Why some teachers may question 'new' education trends
MindShift
Often frustration with the public education system is directed at teachers, even when they are following the standards and guidelines set out by the government. Everyone from politicians, to nonprofits to parents tell teachers how to do their jobs better. So it's no surprise that when the federal state education officials or school superintendents announce a new initiative that not all teachers are ready to jump on the new trend. Education has a long history of reform, each succeeded by another, and teachers have learned to pick and choose carefully where to put their energies.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    7 mid-school year reminders on finishing strong (Connected Principals Blog)
In age of school shootings, lockdown is the new fire drill (The New York Times)
PARCC releases fully functional sample test questions for Common Core (THE Journal)
Are gifted students slighted in schools? (District Administration Magazine)
Why teachers can't reach every child (The Washington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


How 3 districts leverage librarians' digital knowledge
eSchool News
Librarians and libraries are in a unique position to help schools and districts prepare for and progress through the digital transition, according to a just-released Alliance for Excellent Education report. Librarians and school leaders can partner to create strategic technology purchasing and implementation plans, and librarians and educators are able to work together on technology integration when it comes to teaching and learning. School libraries, then, become critical to digital learning experiences.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


When bullies strike in PE, kids avoid physical activities, BYU-led study says
Deseret News
When kids are bullied during physical activities like PE classes and sports, they tend to withdraw from being physically active — not just in class, but in general. A year later, kids who are picked on are less active, according to a study led by BYU researchers. That's true of both overweight and healthy-weight kids, the study found. The research is published in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Advertisement
DreamBox Learning Pre-K-5 Math

DreamBox Learning combines rigorous elementary mathematics with a motivating learning environment and the revolutionary Intelligent Adaptive Learning™ platform. This innovative technology dynamically adapts and individualizes mathematics instruction in real time, empowering students to master key concepts, increase achievement and experience long-lasting confidence. And now, DreamBox Learning Math for iPad – Coming Fall 2013!
Advertisement
A Complete Reading & Math Diagnostic Assessment Solution

Based on scientific research, the GRADE and GMADE suite of products provides everything you need to assess, plan, and deliver your focused instruction in reading and math and will lead your classrooms to reportable success. Learn More.
Advertisement
Virtual Judges Needed for eCYBERMISSION

eCYBERMISSION, a web-based STEM competition for middle school students and sponsored by the U.S. Army, is seeking dedicated individuals over the age of 18 with a background or interest in STEM—to serve as a virtual judge for the program. Virtual Judge registration closes on Saturday, March 1, 2014. MORE.


Do tablets teach? Parents see mobile devices as underachievers, study finds
The Christian Science Monitor
Despite an explosion in the number of educational apps marketed for preschoolers and elementary school-aged children, parents see their young children spending relatively little time learning on mobile devices, according to a new report from the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop, a nonprofit that researches and produces educational media for children. The study, which surveyed parents about their 2- to 10-year-olds' media use, found that while 65 percent of children use mobile devices, only 9 percent play what their parents describe as "educational" mobile games daily, and only 35 percent use educational apps even weekly.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Core capacity: Going beyond required tech upgrades
District Administration Magazine
Implementing technology upgrades required for Common Core assessments can be more opportunity than burden for districts seeking the most academic achievement from their IT spending. The new assessments demand a certain amount of bandwidth and updated operating systems, but by upgrading Wi-Fi networks, hardware and software beyond what the online assessments require, experts say districts also can make substantial improvements to everyday instruction — which, in turn, could lead to higher achievement and test scores.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement




Obama restates old education commitments in 2014 State Of The Union address
The Huffington Post
President Barack Obama's 2014 State of the Union address ran short on fresh education policy ideas, unlike in previous years, according to the text of his speech. Instead of announcing new initiatives, Obama mostly expanded on proposals he announced during and since last year's State of the Union address, tying them to his theme of fighting poverty and pushing the country forward despite legislative inaction. Obama promoted a competition to redesign high school, boosting schools' Internet connectivity, and making college more affordable and accessible — all ideas he has already proposed.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


US court ruling raises K-12 concerns about Internet access
Education Week
Teachers and students count on having relatively broad access to online academic content, but a recent federal court ruling has raised questions about whether the education community could lose some of its ability to tap into the vast library of Internet resources. The decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia this month has been interpreted as giving commercial Internet providers significantly more power to block content or set conditions on its delivery before it reaches customers, including schools.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
How do you learn best? Hands-on style tops survey results
Education Week
Score one for a hands-on style of learning, especially among young people. A new survey finds that getting physically involved in learning something trumps reading about it. The results paint a picture of a very different kind of learning than what is typically found in most classrooms.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
5 common myths about school administration
eSchool News
It's not always teachers who face criticism in the U.S. Many school administrators say that misconceptions about their career motivations and the position in general still exist today — and many myths have survived for decades.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
How much teachers get paid — State by state
The Washington Post
How much do teachers across the United States get paid? Here is data, state by state, collected from the National Center for Education Statistics by Jon Boeckenstedt, associate vice president at DePaul University in Chicago.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more



Political rivals find common ground over Common Core
NPR
Supporters of the new Common Core education standards adopted by 45 states say the standards hold American students to much higher expectations, and move curriculum away from a bubble-test culture that encourages test preparation over deeper learning. But there's growing backlash to Common Core, and conservatives and liberals increasingly are voicing similar concerns: that the standards take a one-size-fits-all approach, create a de facto national curriculum, put too much emphasis on standardized tests and undermine teacher autonomy. The mainstream business wing of the Republican Party strongly backs Common Core, arguing that raising standards is vital to creating the next-generation American workforce. But in an echo of the rifts in the GOP nationally, the Tea Party branch has been critical of the new standards.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Some Michigan schools districts not ready for shift to online tests
The Detroit News
Seven students at a Grosse Pointe elementary school were midway through a 45-minute online math test when their computers crashed. As another 18 students continued to type answers on their keyboards, the unlucky fifth-graders were rebooting their computers. Most lost all of their work and had to retake the test. "It was complete frustration," said Melanie O'Neil, a district principal who was an observer for the state's Smarter Balanced pilot test last April.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE



How are your vendors doing? Tell us in the Principals Buyers' Guide.


In landmark trial, both sides debate whether teacher protection laws fail students
EdSource
The teacher tenure, seniority and dismissal laws that the nonprofit organization Students Matter wants a judge to overturn are essential to create a "professional, stable workforce" and attract teachers into a profession with low pay and difficult conditions, a state deputy attorney general said at the start of the much-anticipated Vergara v State of California trial.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New Jersey could mandate social media education for middle schools
EdTech Magazine
The Internet is no place for a kid — digital native or not — to wander without the proper guidance and training. A 2011 Pew Research Center survey found that 88 percent of kids who were asked said they had "seen other people being mean or cruel," with 15 percent saying they had been "the target of negative behavior in the last 12 months," according to an HLN report.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
20,000 schools already onboard!

TeacherLists.com: an easier, smarter way to create and share teacher wish lists and school supply lists with parents. Earn free supplies too! Learn More.
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the NAESP eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469.420.2629.
MORE


District 87 principal to assume training role
Pantagraph.com
Twenty-five years ago, Mary Kay Scharf was teaching at Illinois State University's Thomas Metcalf School and taking night classes en route to becoming a principal. The setup was less than ideal, with her focus split between classroom duties and completing coursework and projects to receive her principal's certification. Now Scharf, principal at Oakland Elementary School in Bloomington District 87, has been tapped to lead one of three principal training programs in the state. Her appointment, paid with federal money, will be voted on Feb. 12 by the District 87 school board. She knows firsthand the value of mentoring.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Few Los Angeles teachers get bad ratings, trial documents show
Los Angeles Times
More instructors than ever are being evaluated in detail in the Los Angeles Unified School District and only a small percentage are being rated as substandard, according to testimony in litigation aimed at reducing teacher job protections. The results of a new evaluation system became a major topic in the Los Angeles Superior Court trial, which pits the state and teachers unions against a group of families allied with advocates and donors seeking to reshape state education law.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




A grade school where every student is an engineer
MindShift
A fun story about a public elementary school in South Carolina where every student is an engineer. There's plenty of robotics and science, definitely some art — but no handwriting instruction. Is this the future?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Explore digital safety in tweetchat on Feb. 5
NAESP
In honor of Digital Learning Day, NAESP is hosting a tweetchat on digital safety and citizenship on Wednesday, Feb. 5 from 8 to 9 p.m. (Eastern). To help guide the discussion, chat participants are invited to read Sandra Trach's Principal magazine article, "Safe Digital Citizenship" (November/December 2013). Trach, principal of Estabrook Elementary School in Lexington, Massachusetts, will help moderate the #digisafety chat and field questions from participants.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Solve your space jams
NAESP
Does any principal ever complain that they have more space in their school building than they need? Most are constantly looking for corners for a small group to meet or a place to hold one more IEP meeting. In this article, a veteran principals shares the short- and long-term strategies she has used in her school to "create" and maximize space.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
Jan. 24, 2014
Jan. 21, 2014
Jan. 17, 2014
Jan. 14, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063