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Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


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Here are the states that spend the most on public school students
The Huffington Post
The National Center for Education Statistics recently released its latest data on how much money states are investing in public school students. NCES, an arm of the Department of Education, looked at each state's revenues and expenditures per pupil in public elementary and secondary schools during the 2011-2012 school year. The agency also presented data on school spending and revenues at the level of individual school districts. School revenue is defined as funds from "local, intermediate, state, and federal sources," while school expenditure refers to "all amounts of money paid out by a school system."
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The straight path to academic achievement
EdSurge (commentary)
As a former teacher, principal and school improvement officer, I have experience developing rigorous training and leadership programs for new teachers in some of the highest performing and most challenged schools in the country. In these roles I have witnessed the power of strategic, customized professional development and the impact it has on student growth. As Chief School Improvement Officer at Chicago Public Schools, we were able to double student academic growth, reduce serious discipline incidents by 80 percent, as well as increase attendance and freshmen on-track rates.
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Study: Tech access in, outside classroom boosts engagement
eSchool News
Students are more engaged in their learning and tend to show more achievement in certain areas when they have access to technology during school and at home, according to a study from wireless service provider Kajeet and Project Tomorrow, a national education nonprofit. The two-year-long study focused on the impact of mobile devices on teaching and learning. The Making Learning Mobile 2.0 study continues taking an in-depth look at the impact of one-to-one tablet implementation, including internet access outside the classroom, with Chicago Public Schools students.
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New guide aims to help states, schools classify English-language learners
Education Week
As part of a wide-reaching effort to bring more consistency to services for English-language learners, a group of state education officials and ELL experts has unveiled a new set of recommendations on how states and school districts might improve how they identify and initially classify English-learners. Classification policies and evaluation tools can vary widely from state to state, and even district to district, leaving widespread opportunity for misclassification of students.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords ENGLISH LANGUAGE-LEARNERS.


What do we really mean when we say 'personalized learning'?
MindShift
The idea of personalized learning is seductive — it implies moving away from the industrialized form of education that pumps out cookie-cutter students with the same knowledge and skills. After decades of this approach, it is clear that all children don't learn the same way and personalization seems to honor those differences. However, that term has taken on several different meanings.
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Concentrating on word sounds helps reading instruction and intervention
Medical News Today
A neuroimaging study by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggests that phonics, a method of learning to read using knowledge of word sounds, shouldn't be overlooked in favor of a whole-language technique that focuses on visually memorizing word patterns, a finding that could help improve treatment and diagnosis of common reading disorders such as dyslexia.
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Working effectively with parents — sometimes silently
By Thomas Van Soelen (commentary)
Parents are a critical stakeholder in schools, particularly when a leader or governance group needs to make an important decision. What leaders, often times those at the central office, lack are a set of strategies to use with parents other than "let's talk about that." In Georgia, the City Schools of Decatur Board of Education started to experience a wonderful problem in recent years: too many students. After a decade of declining enrollment, multiple years of 10 percent unexpected growth put leaders on high alert.
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How 'backpack funding' is revolutionizing K-12 education and school choice
Reason Foundation
Public schools aren't doing well. Since the early 1970s, we've more than doubled per-pupil spending without increasing test scores for high school seniors. Seems like a problem that's just too big to fix. Yet one of the best ideas to radically improve K-12 education in America is so small, it can fit into the backpack of the tiniest first grader. It's called weighted student formula, or backpack funding. Here's how backpack funding works.
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Study: US teaching time greatly exaggerated
Education Week
The long-held belief that American public school teachers spend at least twice as much time in front of the class than their counterparts in the world's higher-performing school systems is a myth, according to a new study from Teachers Colllege at Columbia University. In a working paper titled "The Mismeasure of Teaching Time," researcher Samuel E. Abrams blames the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics for releasing bad data that academics and journalists have repeated without verifying its accuracy.
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Where school dollars go to waste
The Atlantic
America spends tons of money on education even though the final product isn't very impressive. If children are indeed the future, then they're certainly an expensive one: Of the $3.2 trillion in total expenditures for local and state governments in 2012, education accounted for nearly 28 percent, or $869.2 billion, according to the latest data from the Census Bureau. That figure topped government spending in any other sector, almost doubling the second-largest recipient of taxpayer dollars — public welfare.
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Can school districts regulate what educators say on social media?
By Archita Datta Majumdar (commentary)
The raging social media debate across the country — about inappropriate conduct between teachers and students — is driving school districts to set stringent rules for educators. Along with protecting students from irreparable emotional or other damages, there is also an increasing concern about the damage these actions could do the positive and needful online communication between the two groups.
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Mobile and interactive media use by young children: The good, the bad and the unknown
Boston University Medical Center via The Medical Xpress
Mobile devices are everywhere and children are using them more frequently at young ages. The impact these mobile devices are having on the development and behavior of children is still relatively unknown. In a commentary in the journal Pediatrics, researchers review the many types of interactive media available today and raise important questions regarding their use as educational tools, as well as their potential detrimental role in stunting the development of important tools for self-regulation.
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Obama budget seeks boosts for early education, high schools, technology
Education Week
President Barack Obama may not have many allies left in the newly GOP-dominated Congress — but he's still planning to ask lawmakers for a sizable increase for the U.S. Department of Education in his fiscal year 2016 budget request, sources say. The request, being formally unveiled on Feb. 2, includes big hikes for teacher quality, preschool development grants, civil rights enforcement, education technology, plus a new competitive-grant program aimed at helping districts make better use of their federal and local K-12 dollars.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How schools are tackling truancy (District Administration Magazine)
Find, keep, cultivate the best teachers (District Administration Magazine)
5 essential multimedia skills every educator must master (THE Journal)
Should we use digital technology to 'drill' children? (THE Journal)
Mindfulness exercises improve kids' math scores (Time)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Columbine lawmaker pushing for guns in schools
The Hill
A Colorado state lawmaker who survived the Columbine shooting as a student is pushing a bill that would allow guns in schools. State Rep. Patrick Neville, a Republican from Castle Rock, Colorado, recently introduced gun legislation that would allow teachers with concealed weapons permits to carry firearms in Colorado public schools. Neville, who graduated from Columbine High School and was there on the day of the shooting in 1999, believes that arming teachers is the best way to protect students.
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Lawsuit agreement to force schools to provide physical education
EdSource
As schools tout the importance of exercise in an era of childhood obesity, a California parent and his lawyer have agreed to a settlement with dozens of districts across California that will force elementary schools to prove they are providing at least the minimum amount of physical education required by state law. "We think it's a huge accomplishment and it's going to benefit public health in California," said attorney Donald Driscoll, who represents Alameda parent Marc Babin and the advocacy group Cal200 in a 2013 lawsuit that alleges 37 school districts, including Los Angeles Unified, the largest district in the state, are out of compliance with state physical education law.
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Principals at ED: Setting the tone for excellence and equity
NAESP
Iowa principal Kim Tierney writes: "Principal Ambassador Fellow for the United States Department of Education, Jill Levine, recently turned her vision into reality by providing principals like myself with an opportunity to visit the U.S. Department of Education in order to build relationships with staff and ultimately better inform policy and communications. I represent the entire group of fifteen principals from across the United States when I say that this opportunity exceeded our expectations, and we have Jill to thank!"
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Resolutions committee open hearing conference call
NAESP
On Feb. 4, 2015 at 4 p.m. EST, the Resolutions Committee will hold an Open Hearing conference call where any NAESP member may discuss the modification of any proposed resolution to NAESP's platform. Call 866-290-3067, and enter conference code 02489 to join the call.
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