This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit February 13, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!


Car Line Signs & Tags

Helping elementary schools organize their Car Pool line.

Staff will easily recognize where a child should be at the end of the day.
Visit: www.carlinetags.com

 





More state takeovers of public schools possible
USA Today
The recent takeover of the Little Rock School District by the Arkansas State Board of Education has angered parents and surprised even seasoned school reform observers. The move dissolved the local school board — one ousted board member, Jim Ross, called it a "coup" — and parents took to social media to decry the action. Such a takeover is rare, but as schools nationwide begin to see the results of new math and reading tests based on tougher Common Core standards, they could find themselves the targets of similar moves.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Glimmer of hope in 8-year battle to replace No Child Left Behind
The Christian Science Monitor
The eight-year effort to reauthorize No Child Left Behind, the controversial bill that sets federal education policy, has come down to a battle over testing and accountability among some odd bedfellows. All sides agree that an updated law is an urgent necessity. But the question of what role standardized tests should play and how to hold underperforming schools to account divides deeply.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




The new math strikes back
Time
Given how little algebra, arithmetic and Euclidean geometry have changed in the past century, the perpetual debates about how we should teach math are more than a bit puzzling. The discontent with math curriculum reform has come to be known as the "math wars," complete with viral rants, guides for parents, academic analyses and political maneuvering. According to a recent analysis, 25,000 news articles were written in 2013 on the Common Core state standards alone — and the math recommendations of the Common Core are just the latest permutation of reform, following integrated math, strands math, basic math and discovery math.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Teachers give girls better grades on math tests when they don't know they are girls
Slate
When it comes to explaining why women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and math, it's not enough to point to discrimination in hiring, even though that is a real phenomenon. It's also true that STEM fields have a "pipeline" problem, where not enough girls are choosing to pursue education and eventually careers in science and tech. New research suggests that part of the problem is that girls are being discouraged at very young ages from thinking of themselves as capable at math.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Teaching in the age of Minecraft
The Atlantic
Like many 11-year-olds in Texas, Ethan had to build a model of the Alamo as a school project. Often, students make their dioramas out of paper mache or popsicle sticks, but Ethan's teacher gave him permission to build his project in Minecraft, the popular sandbox software game in which players build structures out of blocks. With his dad’s help, Ethan recorded a video tour of his scale model of the fort, complete with explanatory signs, and posted it on YouTube. A few minutes into the tour, it started raining unexpectedly over Ethan's diorama, but Ethan noted, "This is exactly what happened during the battle of the Alamo — it rained."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  READY-TO-TEACH INTERVENTION

Have you identified students that are not proficient with the new grade level standards? Standards Plus® Common Core Intervention makes it easy to target, teach, and scaffold the prerequisite skills your students are missing.

DOWNLOAD SAMPLE LESSONS
 


Education group wants to halt high-stakes testing for evaluations
District Administration Magazine
Education advocacy group ASCD is calling for a two-year moratorium on using standardized test results for teacher or school evaluations. The move represents a growing push nationally to cut back on testing and limit its use as an accountability measure because it may not accurately reflect a teacher's classroom performance.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


How spelling keeps kids from learning
The Atlantic
Johnny in Topeka can't read, but Janne in Helsinki is effortlessly finishing his storybooks. Such a disparity may be expected by now, but the reason might come as a surprise: It probably has much less to do with teaching style and quality than with language. Simply put, written English is great for puns but terrible for learning to read or write. It's like making children from around the world complete an obstacle course to fully participate in society but requiring the English-speaking participants to wear blindfolds.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT
    1. WHICH ONE IS YOU?
       A. I have to push students through the basic language art skills.
       B. I have to teach what comes along even if students cannot understand it.
       C. I "Rescue" my students by using a structured and sequential approach that
           enhances any reading, spelling, penmanship, and composition curriculum
           including Common Core expectations.




Group seeks to close the 'excellence gap' in nation's elite public schools
The Washington Post
Dozens of principals from some of the nation's most sought-after and selective public high schools gathered last week in Northern Virginia to discuss how to better serve children whose needs they said too often go unmet: High-achieving students from low-income families. Despite their talent, those students are less likely to make it to and through college than their more affluent peers, data show.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Serving kids fruits and vegetables is not a waste of time
Deseret News
Serving a child fruits and vegetables isn't a waste of time, even if the child doesn't like or won't eat them, according to a new study from the University of Arizona. The study found that exposure to a food in childhood is related to liking that food in adulthood, regardless of whether the child liked the food at the time. Being exposed to a food increased liking both healthy and unhealthy foods, so there's some evidence that decreasing a child's exposure to unhealthy foods will make those foods less desirable in the long run.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Where is our obsession with testing leading us?
eSchool News (commentary)
Whenever vitally important goals hang in the balance, people want proof that progress is being made toward achieving those goals. It's human nature — whether those objectives are building a skyscraper, eliminating disease or, perhaps most notably, educating our children. Equitable, effective and high-quality public education is an essential goal not just here in the U.S., but in virtually every global society. The question is, is standardized testing a fair measure of progress? And what do we sacrifice in the pursuit of such testing?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


More kids eating breakfast at US schools
The Des Moines Register
Student participation in school breakfast is growing as the program reaches more children in low-income communities, according to studies released this week by an anti-hunger organization. The Food Research and Action Center estimated 13.2 million students — including 93,000 in about 1,300 Iowa schools — ate free and reduced-price school breakfasts during the 2013-2014 school year. That's up from 12.8 million nationwide a year earlier. The studies found that an average of 11.2 million low-income children ate a healthy morning meal each day at school, an increase of 320,000 children from the previous school year.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Special Discount for NAESP Members!

As a member of NAESP, you could qualify for a special discount on car insurance with GEICO. Simply go online or call 1-800-368-2734, to complete a simple, no-obligation rate quote. Don’t forget to mention your NAESP membership to see how much you could save with your special member discount.
 


How one district showed skeptics the power of 1:1
EdTech Magazine
"It starts with the teachers. They get the ball rolling," says Scott Hagedorn, director of technology for Hardin-Jefferson Independent School District, in Texas. The school district is located near the state's border with Louisiana and includes roughly 2,000 students. Over the last few years, the administration has been rolling out one-to-one programs, providing iPads throughout the district. Before the one-to-one program, the district had a bring-your-own-technology program. This worked fine for a while, but the district began to notice that some students were performing better than others.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Depression in teachers impacts classroom learning
LiveScience
Elementary school teachers who have more symptoms of depression may have a negative influence on some students' academic performance, a new study suggests. In the small study, third-grade teachers who were struggling with symptoms of depression — such as poor appetite, restless sleep, crying spells and feeling like a failure — were generally less likely to create and maintain a high-quality classroom environment for their students compared with teachers who had fewer signs of depression.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords CLASSROOMS.


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamentals for Teaching Smarter

"The Fundamental 5 improves instruction. The power of these practices will transform classrooms and schools," E. Don Brown, NASSP past president. Order now at Amazon.com
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the NAESP eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469.420.2629.
MORE




US reviewing seat belts on school buses
The Detroit News
The new head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is reviewing the government's longtime opposition to mandating safety belts on school buses and is looking at the issue on commercial buses. In a Detroit News interview after an event on school bus safety at an elementary school here, NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind said he has convened a group within the agency to study the issue that NHTSA has been reviewing since 1977.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


School bake sales get a healthy makeover
The Associated Press via CBS News
When it comes to school fundraisers, bake sale tables loaded with sugary goodies are out. Fun runs, auctions and sales of healthier treats are in. Government rules requiring schools to hold more nutritious fundraisers, along with a trend toward healthier eating in schools, could mean trouble for the long-beloved bake sale. In response, schools are selling everything from fruit to kid-friendly shoe laces. Many schools say they have been successful in ditching the unhealthier models.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Title I formula changes included in House Republican NCLB rewrite
Education Week
Lawmakers who have been trying for years to change the way Title I dollars for low-income students are disbursed to school districts scored a big win with House Republicans Wednesday morning. When GOP members on the education committee unveiled the No Child Left Behind Act overhaul that they plan to clear later in the afternoon, it included several technical changes to the measure they originally introduced. Notably, it increased the weight given to the percentage of low-income students in a school district, which is part of how Title I aid is distributed.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Here are the states that spend the most on public school students (The Huffington Post)
What do we really mean when we say 'personalized learning'? (MindShift)
Tanya always forgets. What's wrong with her? (By: Howard Margolis)
Study: High-quality early education could reduce costs (The Washington Post)
Creating the right classroom environment fit for ELLs (By: Alanna Mazzon)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




States weigh turning education funds over to parents
Politico
A radical new concept in school choice will come up for vote in at least a half-dozen states from Virginia to Oklahoma in the coming months, as lawmakers consider giving hundreds of thousands of parents the freedom to design a custom education for their children — at taxpayer expense. Twenty-one states already subsidize tuition at private schools through vouchers or tax credits. The new programs promise far more flexibility, but critics fear they could also lead to waste or abuse as taxpayers underwrite do-it-yourself educations with few quality controls.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Ohio creates statewide school-threat tipline
District Administration Magazine
Ohio Department of Public Safety Director John Born helped create a statewide anonymous tip line for schools that allows students to identify potential threats, such as a student planning to bring a weapon to school. It is now used in more than 820 districts. The 24/7 tip line accepts calls or texts and is answered by trained analysts in the Ohio Department of Homeland Security's Threat Assessment and Prevention Unit. As of mid-January, the tip line had helped the department identify 25 legitimate threats.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Got game? Playing to learn with Minecraft
NAESP
Connecticut Principal Rosie O'Brien Vojtek writes: "Sit down at lunch with young students of any age and ask them what they did that morning in their classroom. They will probably give you a matter-of-fact answer, usually without much enthusiasm. But mention the word 'Minecraft,' and watch them come alive. Suddenly, their eyes get big and they sit up tall; you know you have their attention."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Learn about the new arts standards on NAESP Radio
NAESP
The new National Core Arts Standards challenge educators to thoughtfully integrate arts in the classroom. NAESP Executive Director Gail Connelly and President Mark White join Dennis Inhulsen, president of the National Art Education Association, to discuss the standards and the intersection of language and visual arts.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
Feb. 6, 2015
Feb. 3, 2015
Jan. 30, 2015
Jan. 27, 2015



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063