This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit February 20, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement


Let Kids Fly with ZipKrooz™


ZipKrooz™ brings zip line-like adventure to the playground in an exciting, inclusive and safe way!


Car Line Signs & Tags

Helping elementary schools organize their Car Pool line.

Staff will easily recognize where a child should be at the end of the day.
Visit: www.carlinetags.com

 





Amid measles outbreak, few rules on teacher vaccinations
The Associated Press via ABC News
While much of the attention in the ongoing measles outbreak has focused on student vaccination requirements and exemptions, less attention has been paid to another group in the nation's classrooms: Teachers and staff members, who, by and large, are not required to be vaccinated. In most states, there is no law dictating which vaccines teachers and school staff workers are required to get. Some states provide a list of recommended vaccines, but there is no requirement or follow-up for teachers to receive them. So when a measles case surfaced at a California high school, it was easy for officials to review student records, but there were no immunization records on file for employees.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




More schools serving dinner as need increases
District Administration Magazine
Districts including Los Angeles USD and Dallas ISD will expand after-school supper programs this year, responding to the growing number of students who don't get an evening meal at home. Nationwide, the number of students served dinner or an after-school snack reached nearly 1 million last year. In 2010, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act expanded after-school meal programs to all 50 states after piloting them in 13 states and the District of Columbia.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Report: Fewer kids are frequent readers
The Boston Globe
Books can be a hard sell as kids get older and spend more time texting, on YouTube or playing games on their phones. A new report by children's publishing company Scholastic shows how reading habits change through childhood, and offers hints for parents looking to get their kids to read more. The biannual Kids & Family Reading Report, based on a 2014 survey of more than 2,500 parents and kids, found that the number of kids ages 6-17 who frequently read books for fun (i.e., 5-7 days a week) is lower than it was four years ago — 31 percent versus 37 percent. While more than half (53 percent) of kids ages 6-8 are frequent readers, that figure falls to just 14 percent for kids ages 15-17.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


How can we increase the value of a student's evaluation?
By: Howard Margolis
An evaluation is only as effective as the questions it aims to answer. And often, evaluators fail to see the precise, critical questions that need answering. They don't know the child or situation well enough to identify them. Therefore, they tend to do what they normally do, often leading to boilerplate evaluations and reports that leave parents and teachers wondering, "What new and valuable answers and recommendations did the evaluator provide?"
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Speed and fluency: Taking an individualized approach
Scholastic Administrator Magazine (commentary)
David Dockterman, a contributor for Scholastic Administrator Magazine, writes: "How many of you do puzzles? Come on, raise your hands so I can see them. Remember when you first started? With Sudoku puzzles, it took me a very long time to complete my first ones. The 'easy' levels weren't so easy. I had similar experiences with KenKens, crossword puzzles, and those logic activities in the back of airline magazines. Over time, though, the easy levels eventually became, well, easy. They no longer took a lot of effort or a lot of time. They actually got a bit boring, and I sought out more challenging levels."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  READY-TO-TEACH INTERVENTION

Have you identified students that are not proficient with the new grade level standards? Standards Plus® Common Core Intervention makes it easy to target, teach, and scaffold the prerequisite skills your students are missing.

DOWNLOAD SAMPLE LESSONS
 


Research results from Madison, Wis., schools suggest compassion, kindness can be taught
Wisconsin State Journal
As soon as teacher Kim Smith mentioned "belly buddies," 16 little bodies dropped to the classroom floor and fell silent. The children arranged themselves in a circle on their backs. Smith gave each one a small rock — the belly buddy — to rest on his or her stomach. "Watch it go up and down as you take your belly breaths and calm your body," said Smith, who teaches 4-year-old kindergarten at Stephens Elementary School in Madison. The exercise, done regularly in Smith's classroom, is part of a "kindness curriculum" developed at UW-Madison. By helping children focus on what's happening to their bodies, the hypothesis goes, they will learn to respond with more compassion and less anger when they're frustrated.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


How cultural differences can affect learning
By: Douglas Magrath
Culture is a part of language. Even vocabulary can be culturally loaded. For example, the dictionary may say that "pain" in French and "bread" in English represent the same physical object, but the cultural load will be different. In Turkish, "ekmek" is bread, but it is more than a food item. One does not merely throw old bread away; it is carefully wrapped before being put out. The instructor cannot be an expert on every culture but should be aware of some of the more common areas of potential conflict.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT
    1. WHICH ONE IS YOU?
       A. I have to push students through the basic language art skills.
       B. I have to teach what comes along even if students cannot understand it.
       C. I "Rescue" my students by using a structured and sequential approach that
           enhances any reading, spelling, penmanship, and composition curriculum
           including Common Core expectations.




New tools emerge to support schools' digital transition
eSchool News
School districts across the country are replacing print textbooks with free open educational resources; however, many are finding it difficult to evaluate the quality and relevancy of these unlimited online resources. A number of service providers are releasing resources to support the growing number of districts shifting from print to digital content as they implement one-to-one or blended learning environments.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Common Core driving schools' technology needs
EdTech Magazine
The adoption of Common Core State Standards is driving bandwidth and technology upgrades at K-12 schools across the country, according to a new survey released in January. The fourth-annual Principals' Assessment of Public Education survey, created by MCH Strategic Data in partnership with edWeb.net, surveyed 539 principals at elementary, middle and high schools on a variety of topics, including funding, leadership and testing and assessment. The top issue for principals is the adoption of Common Core State Standards. The Common Core State Standards affect more than just curriculum. Nearly 57 percent of those principals surveyed say that the new standards are driving their technology purchases.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Bullying prevention: Can students make kindness cool?
The Christian Science Monitor
Schools are increasingly turning to students to develop and implement anti-bullying initiatives designed not just to discourage bullying, but also to empower students to intervene.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The 5 most important terms for transforming schools
eSchool News
It is not terribly difficult to get people to agree on the need for school transformation. The expression of this need comes not only from the "usual suspects," i.e. politicians and academics, but also from teachers, administrators and parents. Yet, despite this agreement the specific nature of what the transformed school should look like is harder to pin down. The agenda for school transformative change reveals five critical terms. Each of these terms have been used when talking about teaching and learning in schools for decades. That's the problem.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords SCHOOLS.


How to change inflexible teacher pay systems
National Journal
Try this on for a management challenge. Your annual operating budget hasn't seen an increase in years and likely won't for a while. Your customer base is unpredictable at best and decreasing at worst. And your employees, who are hard to fire, are guaranteed a 1 percent to 3 percent salary increase each year just for sticking around. The payroll costs grow. The budget shrinks. At some point, something has to give. This is situation faced by hundreds of school districts around the country, many of them in urban areas with a lot of poverty. Their funding is flat or decreasing, with no relief in sight.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Special Discount for NAESP Members!

As a member of NAESP, you could qualify for a special discount on car insurance with GEICO. Simply go online or call 1-800-368-2734, to complete a simple, no-obligation rate quote. Don’t forget to mention your NAESP membership to see how much you could save with your special member discount.
 


Game face on: Gamification for engaging teachers in professional development
Edutopia
Creativity, contentment, awe and wonder, excitement, curiosity, pride, surprise, love, relief and joy. These are the ten emotions that game players experience, according to Jane McGonigal in Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Change the World. Do teachers report feeling any of these emotions when they describe professional development? No (except for maybe relief when it's over).
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Nearly half of low-income kids don't eat breakfast. Here's 1 way to fix that
The Huffington Post
Hunger is on the rise among children in the U.S., and though there are systems in place to make sure low-income kids are fed at school, a concerning number of struggling students aren't eating breakfast. One in five kids relied on food stamps last year, yet nearly half of low-income children didn't sit down to the most important meal of the day, according to a recent report released by the Food Research and Action Center.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Can too many snow days widen the achievement gap?
The Hechinger Report
Boston English teacher Becca Harbeson has been trying so hard to keep her 10th-graders engaged in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet this winter that she's resorted to text messaging them about the play. The city's public schools have had eight snow days so far this school year, nearly all of them in the past few weeks. All the days off mean Harbeson's students at Madison Park High School, located in Boston's largely poor and minority neighborhood of Roxbury, have been missing several classes each week that she had hoped to devote to discussing the Bard — a text many of Harbeson's students struggle with under the best of circumstances. So she's using every means necessary to stay in touch.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
Your Fundamental Solution for Improving Instruction

"The Fundamental 5 maximizes teacher effectiveness. It is the best instructional system I have ever observed." Robert Brezina, U.S. Academic Decathlon Past President.
Order now on Amazon.com
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the NAESP eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469.420.2629.
MORE




GOP in driver's seat as Congress tackles NCLB rewrite
Education Week
Recently, lawmakers on Capitol Hill have continued to plow ahead with efforts to update the much-maligned No Child Left Behind Act, the latest iteration of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Republican lawmakers are in the driver's seat in both chambers where Title I portability, testing, and accountability continue to be the most hotly debated policy issues.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Saving school choice without undermining poor communities
The Atlantic
The House of Representatives is slated to consider an overhaul of ESEA this month, and Senate legislation is moving forward in committee. Many contentious issues are at play — from student testing to teacher accountability — but among the biggest to emerge is the question of whether federal funds dedicated to help low-income students should be allowed to follow those students to schools they choose. As No Child Left Behind currently stands, that money is allocated toward the schools that enroll the students rather than the students themselves.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




States ceding power over classroom materials
Education Week
States are increasingly giving up a long-standing source of their power over education by allowing school districts to choose the instructional materials they use in the classroom. The shift in authority has taken shape little by little, mostly in the past four years, as one state after another has modified or thrown out its procedures for adopting textbooks and other kinds of print and online learning resources. Only 19 states are now considered "adoption states" — states that review textbooks and other resources and create lists of "approved" materials — by the Association of American Publishers.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Should we stop making kids memorize times tables? (The Hechinger Report)
Gifted and talented programs dumb down our students (Time)
Playing with math: How math circles bring learners together for fun (MindShift)
Glimmer of hope in 8-year battle to replace No Child Left Behind (The Christian Science Monitor)
How spelling keeps kids from learning (The Atlantic)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Texas bill highlights issue of whether teachers should be armed
By: Archita Datta Majumdar
A new bill proposed by Texas state Rep. Dan Flynn speaks of arming Texas teachers with guns and allowing them to use deadly force against students. Naturally, this has added more fuel to the fire that is already roasting a lot of tongues around the country. The bill, called The Teacher's Protection Act, offers teachers the opportunity to protect themselves both from unruly students and unwanted intrusion from others in the campus. It will also ensure that they will not face any kind of prosecution for their actions if they do use these firearms.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




NAESP advances the interests of principals as ESEA moves on Capitol Hill
NAESP
NAESP continues to work with lawmakers on Capitol Hill and stakeholder partners in the advocacy community to put forward the principals' perspective on key issues as the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act moves quickly in the House and Senate. The following provides a recap on activities over the past week, as well as information about key policy positions NAESP has put forward on behalf of principals.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Encourage reading at home with Report to Parents
NAESP
Encouraging children to read at home is one of the most powerful ways that parents can support students' learning. Just 15 minutes of reading at home per day can make a difference in students' reading fluency. The latest issue of Report to Parents helps families prioritize reading, and is easy to download and distribute to families in your school community. You can find the latest and past issues in the Report to Parents archives, with both English and Spanish versions available.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
Feb. 13, 2015
Feb. 10, 2015
Feb. 6, 2015
Feb. 3, 2015



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063