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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit February 24, 2015

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


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How does your school use social media to connect with families?
By: Brian Stack
As I was walking down the hall the other day, I was struck by some recent student artwork that had been posted by one of our art teachers. I took a few pictures of them on my phone and quickly uploaded them to our Facebook page with a caption that read, "Check out some of the latest pieces of art by students in Ms. Ladd's class!" I regularly post pictures and quick updates like this to our school's Facebook page several times a day. These updates, combined with posts of links to blog articles and our weekly newsletter, help our families stay connected to our school community.
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Audio and the core assessments
Scholastic Administrator Magazine
When school technology directors and administrators are thinking about this year's newly mandated audio requirements for language arts assessment, their minds immediately turn to headphones and headsets. And they should. However, there's another audio option that many may not be aware of, one that involves a much smaller investment: earbuds, which come in a variety of models that sport diverse features to fit the needs of any classroom.
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Students will dance, act and design with core arts standards
District Administration Magazine
You think math and English have high standards? Try the arts. The National Core Arts Standards were released in October. They update the initial standards released in 1994, which included instructional guidelines for dance, music, theater and visual arts. The new standards add media arts such as animation, film, gaming and computer design. They emphasize developing artistic ideas, refining them, and following projects through to completion. They also require students to analyze artworks, including by examining societal, cultural and historical contexts.
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Poll: Widespread misperceptions about the Common Core standards
The Washington Post
Many Americans are confused about the Common Core State Standards, according to a new poll that finds widespread misperceptions that the academic standards — which cover only math and reading — extend to topics such as sex education, evolution, global warming and the American Revolution. A 55 percent majority said the Common Core covers at least two subjects that it does not, according to the survey that Fairleigh Dickinson University conducted and funded. Misperceptions were widespread, including among both supporters and opponents of the program and peaking among those who say they are paying the most attention to the standards.
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Virtual education: Genuine benefits or real-time demerits?
The Atlantic (commentary)
Jen Karetnick, a contributor for The Atlantic, writes: "Last August, Dalia Ahmed, a former student of mine, was eager to begin her final year at Miami Arts Charter School in Miami, Florida. As a talented young poet who had already won numerous national awards for her work, she was on track to graduate as one of the top five members of her class. Even with four Advanced Placement courses in her schedule, Ahmed anticipated a fulfilling senior year as she prepared applications for both merit- and need-based scholarships to Ivy League colleges."
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These are the states that suspend students at the highest rates
The Huffington Post
Schools in the Sunshine State may not rank at the top as far as SAT scores or high school graduation rates, but they did suspend students at the highest rate in the country during the 2011-2012 school year, according to a report released Monday by UCLA's Center for Civil Rights Remedies. Using the latest data from the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights, the report and an accompanying research tool analyzes which states and school districts handed out the most out-of-school suspensions and whom these suspensions most affected.
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What happens when computers, not teachers, pick what students learn?
The Hechinger Report
Teacher John Garuccio wrote a multiplication problem on a digital whiteboard in a corner of an unusually large classroom at David A. Boody Intermediate School in Brooklyn. About 150 sixth graders are in this math class — yes, 150 — but Garuccio's task was to help just 20 of them, with a lesson tailored to their needs. He asked, "Where does the decimal point go in the product?" After several minutes of false starts, a boy offered the correct answer. Garuccio praised him, but did not stop there.
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    1. WHICH ONE IS YOU?
       A. I have to push students through the basic language art skills.
       B. I have to teach what comes along even if students cannot understand it.
       C. I "Rescue" my students by using a structured and sequential approach that
           enhances any reading, spelling, penmanship, and composition curriculum
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Hard steps not yet taken: Ending bullying in our schools
Edutopia (commentary)
Maurice Elias, a contributor for Edutopia, writes: "While we have made progress in reducing bullying and related behaviors in many of our schools, the problem persists in too many others. This is partly because we see it as an 'engineering' problem, when in fact it is more of a philosophical and moral one. Since there is abundant guidance about what to do to end bullying, I wanted to get a different perspective from the voice of an advocate. Dr. Stuart Green is the director of New Jersey Coalition for Bullying Awareness and Prevention. Dr. Green has fielded numerous calls for over a decade from parents about children who have been bullied with slow or inadequate responses from their schools. This has been true even in states like New Jersey with strong, clear anti-bullying laws."
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The secret to secured entries at schools
By: Charlie Howell
Schools across the nation are reacting to the public outcry to do something in the name of security to protect students and teachers from violence. Many schools look at the concept of a secured entry — a holding vestibule for unauthorized persons until they are vetted and authorized to enter — as the big answer. However, these schools are spending money to create secured entries that are not likely to work when they are needed. I have only seen nine instances in approximately the last 100 implemented or planned secured entries that have a chance at performing their function.
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As Common Core test season begins, teachers feel pressure
Education Week
According to the calendar, it's only two-thirds of the way through winter. But the spring testing season has begun. Tests in many states are being given earlier than they were last year, and that's putting pressure on teachers to cover as much content as they can before testing begins. The pinch is most acute in the District of Columbia and the 10 states that are administering the common exams developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC.
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If your teacher likes you, you might get a better grade
NPR
Were you ever the teacher's pet? Or did you just sit behind the teacher's pet and roll your eyes from time to time? A newly published paper suggests that personality similarity affects teachers' estimation of student achievement. That is, how much you are like your teacher contributes to his or her feelings about you — and your abilities. "Astonishingly, little is known about the formation of teacher judgments and therefore about the biases in judgments," says Tobias Rausch, an author of the study and a research scientist at the Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg in Germany. "However, research tells us that teacher judgments often are not accurate."
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Do students like your teaching? Try this and find out
eSchool News (commentary)
Alan November, a contributor for eSchool News, writes: "What if we asked our students about the type of work they would prefer to do while in class? It may reveal a lot about their personal learning styles. These days, when I meet with students across the country, I perform a little experiment. After informing the class that they are to learn about Romeo and Juliet, and specifically how to go about interpreting the text, I present them with a choice between two teaching styles, in the form of two different teachers, who I call Teacher A and Teacher B."
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Lawmakers look to rein in alternative diplomas
Disability Scoop
A new proposal in Congress would ensure that parents of students with disabilities are provided more information before their child is taken off track for a regular diploma. Under a bill introduced In the U.S. Senate, states would be required to establish clear guidelines outlining which students with disabilities qualify for testing based on alternate academic standards. Who takes these modified exams is significant because doing so often disqualifies students from achieving at the level necessary for a traditional high school diploma.
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Principal in the classroom: Can New Orleans school make it work?
The Christian Science Monitor
When newly minted principal Krystal Hardy took over Sylvanie Williams College Prep elementary, a charter school in New Orleans, she had a vision. The children's academic progress had faltered and disciplinary infractions were on the rise. A former classroom teacher turned instructional coach, Hardy was appointed principal so she could work closely with her relatively young, inexperienced teachers. Her vision was to help them be the best they could be.
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California task force urges reform of special education funding
EdSource
Federal and state funding rates for special education would be equalized across California and new special education teachers would be authorized to teach general education if draft recommendations from a task force presented are implemented. In addition, school districts would include in their new three-year planning documents, known as Local Control and Accountability Plans, details about how they are improving outcomes for special education students, according to a preview of a long-awaited report from the Statewide Special Education Task Force, a group funded by foundations to recommend transformative changes in special education in California.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Are iPads the solution to snow days? (The Atlantic)
The power of observation (By: Pamela Hill)
'Fraction phobia': The root of math anxiety? (Education Week)
Report: Fewer kids are frequent readers (The Boston Globe)
The 5 most important terms for transforming schools (eSchool News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




NAESP 2015-2016 platform approved
NAESP
The proposed resolutions were approved by the Board of Directors and the General Assembly was informed on Feb. 22. The NAESP Platform serves as the statement of beliefs for the Association and its members, elementary and middle-level principals. It consists of a summary of all resolutions adopted by business meetings, and since 1974, by Delegate Assemblies. The Platform is reviewed and updated annually and submitted to the Board of Directors in February.
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NAESP elections to open this Friday
NAESP
For 2015, voting will take place Friday, Feb. 27 through Thursday, March 12. Eligible NAESP members may vote for the President-Elect and Vice President during this voting window. New Zone Directors will also be elected in Zones 5, 7 and 9 in accordance with their zone process. If you have questions about your zone election, please contact your zone director. Members can learn about the candidates and find instructions on how to vote at www.naesp.org/2015-naesp-election.
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