This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement


 

Advertisement



Online learning softens impact of snow days
District Administration Magazine
Snow days are melting away as schools increasingly take advantage of online curriculum to keep students learning virtually during weather closures. There are no statistics available on how many U.S. schools are turning snow days into online learning days. In Chicago Public Schools, it is a voluntary practice, with some teachers posting online coursework for students to complete on snow days. In some 1-to-1 Chicago schools, students downloaded lessons to their devices before leaving school in anticipation of snow storms in January and February, according to a district spokesperson.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


Advertisement


Montessori schools surge in popularity among new generation of Jewish parents
The New York Times
In the boys' classroom at Lamplighters Yeshivah in the Hasidic Jewish stronghold of Crown Heights, Brooklyn, Montessori number-counting boards and decimal beads share space with Hebrew-learning materials. A colorful timeline on the wall shows two strands of world history in parallel: secular on the left, Jewish on the right. A photo of the grand rabbi of the Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidic movement hangs above a list of tasks that children perform individually: make a fractions poster, practice cursive, learn about the moon's phases.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




The Common Core is tough on kids with special needs
The Atlantic
In a recent discussion board thread on reading comprehension challenges in autism, a special-education teacher commented that her students can't understand the assigned reading passages. "When I complained, I was told that I could add extra support, but not actually change the passages," she wrote. "It is truly sad to see my students' frustration." Why must this teacher's students contend with passages that are too complex for them to understand? She attributes this inflexibility to the Common Core, new standards — created in 2009 by a group of education professionals, none of them K-12 classroom teachers or special-education experts — that have been adopted by 45 states.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


One way to help solve America's major curriculum problem
The Washington Post (commentary)
Common Core State Standards, accountability, benchmarks, teacher quality, evaluation, test design and uses, value-added measurement, Race to the Top, international comparisons — all of these are at the center of fierce debates in the education world. Marion Brady argues in this post that they are all sideshows to the real problem in American schools — curriculum — and he offers a way out. Brady has worked as a teacher, administrator, college professor, contributor to academic journals, textbook and professional book author, consultant to publishers and foundations, newspaper columnist.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Common Core in action: 10 visual literacy strategies
Edutopia
Do you wish your students could better understand and critique the images that saturate their waking life? That's the purpose of visual literacy, to explicitly teach a collection of competencies that will help students think through, think about and think with pictures.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Need REAL Common Core Content?

We spent three years developing Common Core Standards Plus to be your Common Core solution. Includes ready-to-teach units with content at all four DOK levels, step-by-step instruction, performance tasks, rubrics, and more!

LEARN MORE -- WATCH A TWO-MINUTE VIDEO
 


How project-based learning is transforming classrooms
By Brian Stack
At many schools around the country, project-based learning is transforming classrooms by creating student-centered environments where teachers can act as facilitators of learning, coaching students as they use critical thinking, problem-solving and inquiry to make sense of their world. At my New Hampshire school, Sanborn Regional High School, project-based learning is helping students connect with their world and their community in ways that a classroom experience never could.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Putting math standards into motion
District Administration Magazine
Giving math teachers the training and classroom tools to effectively implement the Common Core is the biggest challenge school districts face when it comes to improving achievement. That's why making teachers comfortable with the new standards will be a driving force in many of the sessions at this spring's National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' conference. But the standards alone will not ensure improvement in student learning, says Matt Larson, a featured speaker at the conference taking place April 9-12 in New Orleans. What's needed, Larson says, are the "Principles to Actions" that NCTM will release at the conference.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword MATH.


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamental 5 - A Kindle Best Seller

Discover the revolutionary system of daily teacher actions that are transforming 1000's
of classrooms across
the nation. Order now on Amazon.com
Advertisement
STANLEY Offers Comprehensive School Security

We’re partnering with educational facilities to develop solutions for safer schools. We offer intrusion detection, video, panic buttons, access control, monitoring, door hardware, and more.


8 key recommendations for Common Core online assessments
eSchool News
Common Core online assessments are scheduled to begin in districts across the country in the spring of 2014 through 2015. However, many districts still struggle to implement these online assessments, thanks to inadequate bandwidth and lack of technology infrastructure. National consortia and multiple school districts have offered eight key recommendations to help districts in their implementation efforts.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Experts: Here's how to turn data into achievement (eSchool News)
Study: Adderall doesn't help kids get better grades (The Atlantic)
How can schools develop transformational leaders? (District Administration Magazine)
Survey: Students' personal data are at risk (NPR)
10 guidelines for stopping cyberbullying (Psychology Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Advertisement




Students, say goodbye to snow days — And say hello to school at home
CNN
School leaders around the country are tearing up their calendars to cram in more teaching time after extreme numbers of weather cancellations. Some are eliminating holiday breaks and professional development plans, adding minutes and days to the school clock or even cutting recess and opening school on Saturdays. But a few are trying something different: virtual school days that continue learning, even while staff and students are stuck at home.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


5 reasons your portfolio should be online
Connected Principals Blog (commentary)
George Couros, a contributor for Connected Principals Blog, writes: "Having a conversation with teachers and administrators, I asked how many of them still had 'paper portfolios.' Surprisingly, it was over half of the room, and many of them had developed it in university, updating it only when job opportunities arose. I remember actually having a paper portfolio and applying for jobs, and hating the process of dusting off a binder, adding a ton of great information into it, only to walk into an interview and have the person hiring not even look at it. It was extremely frustrating as I had put a lot of work into it, only to have it ignored, and I never really understood why. And then I became a principal."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


'Platooning' on the rise in early grades
Education Week
At Sharpstein Elementary School in Walla Walla, Wash., second-graders are getting used to a routine that most American children don't learn for four more years: Several times a day, they line up and switch classrooms and teachers by subject. They spend the morning with one teacher for reading and writing, breaking in the middle for music, library or physical education classes. After lunch, they head to another room for math and science. Then students return to their original teacher for social studies. Sharpstein's third-, fourth-, and fifth-graders have similar schedules.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Advertisement
DreamBox Learning Pre-K-5 Math

DreamBox Learning combines rigorous elementary mathematics with a motivating learning environment and the revolutionary Intelligent Adaptive Learning™ platform. This innovative technology dynamically adapts and individualizes mathematics instruction in real time, empowering students to master key concepts, increase achievement and experience long-lasting confidence. And now, DreamBox Learning Math for iPad – Coming Fall 2013!
Advertisement
Presentation Value & Performance: All in One

Get the best value, greatest versatility, and most cutting-edge technology for your presentation and display needs with Triumph Board, exclusively distributed by VWR. Our complete collection of interactive presentation tools including Touch Screen LED/LCDs, Interactive Whiteboards, and Laser Projectors, provide more included features than leading brands – for the same price! Learn More Now
Advertisement
Virtual Judges Needed for eCYBERMISSION

eCYBERMISSION, a web-based STEM competition for middle school students and sponsored by the U.S. Army, is seeking dedicated individuals over the age of 18 with a background or interest in STEM—to serve as a virtual judge for the program. Virtual Judge registration closes on Saturday, March 1, 2014. MORE.


Class size matters a lot, research shows
The Washington Post
Every now and then someone in education policy (Arne Duncan) or education philanthropy (Bill Gates) or the media (Malcolm Gladwell) will say something about why class size isn't really very important because a great teacher can handle a boatload of kids. Not really. A new review of the major research that has been conducted on class size by Northwestern University Associate Professor Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach and published by the National Education Policy Center at the University of Colorado Boulder makes clear that class size matters, and it matters a lot.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The real problem with school Internet
eSchool News
For schools across the country, mobile device management and online testing concerns start at the basic level: "How do we get the internet and infrastructure needed?" As it turns out, even the eRate stops short, and schools just can't find the funding they need. That's why many districts are turning to their states and local districts for help.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


At private schools, another way to say 'financial aid'
The New York Times
Shannon Lubiano never dreamed she could send her children to the Duke School, an independent elementary school in Durham, N.C., where the tuition is $15,000 for prekindergarten, rising to nearly $18,000 for eighth grade. But then a friend told her about the school's indexed tuition plan — essentially a pay-what-you-can model for a private education — and that made all the difference for her. "When I tell other people about it, they are shocked," said Lubiano, whose husband, a chef, owns a restaurant in town. "They had looked at the Duke School in the past and got run off by the cost."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




US Department of Education announces awards to 9 states to continue efforts to turn around lowest-performing schools
US Department of Education
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced that nine states will receive more than $71 million to continue efforts to turn around their persistently lowest-achieving schools through awards from the department's School Improvement Grants program. The states that will be using the funds to make new awards are: Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Iowa, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma and South Dakota. Wyoming will use the funds to make continuation awards.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
8 key recommendations for Common Core online assessments
eSchool News
Common Core online assessments are scheduled to begin in districts across the country in the spring of 2014 through 2015. However, many districts still struggle to implement these online assessments, thanks to inadequate bandwidth and lack of technology infrastructure.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
5 common myths about school administration
eSchool News
It's not always teachers who face criticism in the U.S. Many school administrators say that misconceptions about their career motivations and the position in general still exist today — and many myths have survived for decades.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
How much teachers get paid — State by state
The Washington Post
How much do teachers across the United States get paid? Here is data, state by state, collected from the National Center for Education Statistics by Jon Boeckenstedt, associate vice president at DePaul University in Chicago.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more



USDA tells schools: Don't refuse food to students who owe
NPR
U.S. school systems should not take cafeteria lunches away from students whose parents have not paid their accounts, says the Department of Agriculture. The agency is responding to a January incident in which a Utah elementary school served students food but threw it away when their accounts were found to have a negative balance. That episode caused outrage and drew apologies from school officials in Salt Lake City, particularly after it became national news.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New NCLB waiver reports show more issues with struggling schools, new tests
Education Week
The U.S. Department of Education released waiver monitoring reports for three more states Friday night that show continued struggles with low-performing schools and new tests aligned to the common core. Kansas is dinged because the interventions for its focus schools do not seem to line up with the reasons those schools were selected for this designation in the first place. (Focus schools are those with the largest achievement gaps in the state.) This is a common problem among many waiver states.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




In rural Florida, Common Core brings big changes to classrooms
The Hechinger Report
Florida is one of the 45 states that's adopted the education standards known as Common Core. The idea is that, for the first time, students will have the same rigorous, educational goals regardless of where in the country they attend school. Governor Rick Scott has become increasingly vocal against the standards and accompanying tests which he says open the door for too much federal involvement in schools. Many rural Florida districts are forging ahead anyway. The Hechinger Report's Jackie Mader visited one panhandle district where teachers are welcoming the transition.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Rhode Island politicians propose social media privacy legislation
Brown Daily Herald
Senate Majority Leader Dominick Ruggerio, D-Providence and North Providence, and Rep. Brian Patrick Kennedy, D-Hopkinton and Westerly, introduced legislation to limit the information employers and schools can obtain from social media sites, according to a General Assembly press release. The bill prohibits employers and educational institutions from penalizing an employee or student for refusing to disclose social media information, divulging the personal social media contact information of its students or employees or compelling an employee or student to divulge any information regarding their personal social media account, according to the press release.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
20,000 schools already onboard!

TeacherLists.com: an easier, smarter way to create and share teacher wish lists and school supply lists with parents. Earn free supplies too! Learn More.
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the NAESP eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact Geoffrey Forneret at 469.420.2629.
MORE




Reinforcement, and rewards, fuel good behavior at school
Tampa Bay Times
Sometimes children forget things — pencils, paper, homework, how to behave — and they need reminders. To address those issues, Eastside Elementary School assistant principal Lisa Piesik gathers students every nine weeks for behavior expectations updates. At the beginning of the year, Piesik spoke with each grade level individually. Now she sees students two grade levels at a time and presents them with data so they can see how they are doing. The most successful are rewarded. At the most recent meeting of fourth- and fifth-graders, Piesik announced the latest numbers. During the previous nine weeks, kindergartners had 22 disciplines. First grade had 25. Second grade had 35. Third grade tied with first grade. Fourth grade had the lowest number, 19, and fifth-graders had 50.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE



How are your vendors doing? Tell us in the Principals Buyers' Guide.




Principals gather on Capitol Hill to launch NAESP's advocacy agenda
NAESP
Nearly 200 principals will meet with their members of Congress to discuss federal education policies, such as the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, and the early childhood legislation that will expand pre-kindergarten programs, while attending NAESP's National Leaders Conference, Feb. 23-25 in Arlington, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


NAESP dedicates Dawn Hochsprung Tree of Life Memorial
NAESP
To honor the life of Dawn Hochsprung (longtime NAESP member and late Sandy Hook Elementary School principal), the NAESP Board of Directors has established the Dawn Hochsprung Tree of Life Memorial. The memorial, which is displayed at the NAESP Headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia, was created to honor elementary and middle-level principals who have made an extraordinary sacrifice during their career as an educator.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
Feb. 18, 2014
Feb. 14, 2014
Feb. 11, 2014
Feb. 7, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063