This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.


Advertisement


  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Mar. 8, 2013

Curriculum    School Leadership   Federal Advocacy & Policy   In the States   Association News   Buy Books   Contact NAESP


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


Moving
To Success

Moving to
Success is a comprehensive, developmental elementary physical education curriculum guide.
MORE



 

Advertisement



Districts tying principal reviews to test scores
Education Week
A growing number of school districts — including large ones like those in Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles and Hawaii — have become recent converts to new principal-evaluation systems that tie school leaders' appraisals to student test scores. As of this school year, student achievement accounts for 40 percent to 50 percent of principals' evaluations in each of those school systems, while district leaders in a number of other places are preparing to make similar changes in coming school years.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement


Can milk sweetened with aspartame still be called milk?
NPR
The dairy industry has a problem. Despite studies demonstrating milk's nutritional benefits, people are drinking less and less of it. Even children are increasingly opting for water or other low-cal options — including diet soda and artificially sweetened sports drinks. So how can milk — especially school kids' favorite, chocolate milk — compete in the low-cal arena? The dairy industry has a strategy: Swap the sugar that's added to flavored milks for a zero-calorie sweetener such as aspartame (or other options such as plant-based stevia).
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Teaching computer coding in K-12
ED.gov Blog
Where can you go to find — in one place — Arne Duncan, Mark Zuckerberg, Marco Rubio, Stephen Hawking and Snoop Dogg agreeing with each other? Not sure? Now add into the mix Dr. Oz, Richard Branson and Michael Bloomberg. Give up? The answer is the overflowing, impressive testimonial page on CODE.org, a new nonprofit created to promote the teaching of computer coding into America's schools. Founded by Hadi Partovi, CODE.org shines a light on 21st century society's need for computer scientists and programmers. According to stats on the CODE.org website, 90 percent of American schools currently don't offer coding while, by 2020, there will be about a million more computer jobs than computer science students. Partovi aims to connect engineers with schools and to help educators bring computer programming to their classrooms.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  The Times... They Are A Changin'!

Did you know Common Core Standards require 3rd Graders to use area models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning? Common Core Standards Plus teaches this concept and addresses other major changes.
Teach Common Core Every Day with
Common Core Standards Plus
LEARN MORE
 


Climate change science poised to enter nation's classrooms
eSchool News
New national science standards that make the teaching of global warming part of the public school curriculum are slated to be released, potentially ending an era in which climate skepticism has been allowed to seep into the nation's classrooms. The Next Generation Science Standards were developed by the National Research Council, the National Science Teachers Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the nonprofit Achieve, and more than two dozen states. They recommend that educators teach the evidence for man-made climate change starting as early as elementary school and incorporate it into all science classes, ranging from earth science to chemistry.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


STEM education must start in early childhood
Education Week (commentary)
According to a 2010 survey by Change the Equation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan corporate initiative to further math and science learning, nearly one-third of Americans would rather clean their bathrooms than do a math problem. In a globally competitive economy, with employers of all shapes and sizes increasingly seeking workers skilled in science, technology, engineering and math, this is humorous and more than a little troubling. Investing to ensure a pipeline of workers skilled in STEM competencies is a workforce issue, an economic-development issue, and a business imperative. And the best way to ensure return on these investments is to start fostering these skills in young children.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement
Sponsored Content




What parents need to know about race-based academic goals
NBC Latino
What is the No Child Left Behind Act, and why do some states have waivers from it? The No Child Left Behind Act, a federal school-accountability law passed by Congress in 2001, called for all students to be proficient in reading and math by the end of the 2013-2014 school year. Schools are required to report on the progress of all students, but they must also break out certain groups of students, including racial minorities, English language learners and students in special education.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Turn any flat surface into an interactive whiteboard!

Affordably priced at $499, now!Board® is portable, versatile, and easy-to-use. Available from Learning Resources®.
LEARN MORE
Advertisement
Create Safe Playgrounds & Common Areas

• Creates safe, responsible and respectful school
common areas
• Gives supervisors positive strategies they can use immediately
Get FREE demo!


Schools shift from textbooks to tablets
eSchool News
Well before the cleanup from Superstorm Sandy was in full swing, students could read about the weather system that slammed the East Coast in their textbooks. Welcome to the new digital bookcase, where traditional ink-and-paper textbooks have given way to iPads and book bags are getting lighter. Publishers update students' books almost instantly with the latest events or research. Schools are increasingly looking to handheld tablets as a way to sustain students' interest, reward their achievements and, in some cases, actually keep per-student costs down.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Building capacity for connected educators
Connected Principals
Joe Mazza, a contributor for Connected Principals, writes: "As school leaders, it's our responsibility to expose our learning communities to new ways of supporting each other, including resources that are both physical and human. As I learn from and share with educators all over the world, I’m constantly thinking of how to get more of my PLN’s expertise into my own school, supporting my own students. Earlier in the year we Skyped in 17 year-old Nikhil Goyal as our #KnappCamp back to school keynote, but this session would pull in the voice of the teacher."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement


Study: Best and worst teachers can be flagged early
Education Week
New teachers become much more effective with a few years of classroom experience, but a working paper by a team of researchers suggests the most — and least — effective elementary teachers show their colors at the very start of their careers. "This is a fundamentally different time period for teachers, when we know they are going through changes," said lead author Allison Atteberry, a research associate in the Center on Education Policy and Workforce Competitiveness at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


K-12 student database jazzes tech startups, spooks parents
Reuters
An education technology conference in Austin, Texas, will clang with bells and whistles as startups eagerly show off their latest wares. But the most influential new product may be the least flashy: a $100 million database built to chart the academic paths of public school students from kindergarten through high school. In operation just three months, the database already holds files on millions of children identified by name, address and sometimes social security number. Learning disabilities are documented, test scores recorded, attendance noted. In some cases, the database tracks student hobbies, career goals, attitudes toward school — even homework completion.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Advertisement
Intelligent Adaptive Learning™ K-5 Math

DreamBox Learning combines rigorous elementary mathematics aligned to the Common Core State Standards with a motivating learning environment and the revolutionary DreamBox® Intelligent Adaptive Learning™ platform. This innovative technology dynamically adapts and individualizes mathematics instruction in real time. As a result, students master key concepts, increase achievement and experience long-lasting confidence. MORE
Advertisement
Scholastic Classroom Books

Jumpstart the process of building a better classroom library with the Scholastic Classroom Books “mini” Evaluation Protocol. Use this research-based, quick and easy-to-use audit tool to assess your current classroom books and give you the knowledge to build on them to ensure you have the right books for your students.
Advertisement
An Education Program for Every Educator

Wright State University offers 100% online advanced degree programs: M.Ed. Teacher Leader, M.Ed. Principal, Ed.S. in Curriculum & Instruction and Ed.S. in Superintendent. Degree completion in 24 months. Best College & Faculty ranked #1 by U.S. News & Forbes. Scholarships available for Charter Members. MORE


Nurturing the next Van Gogh? Start with small steps
MindShift
If it's true that fostering creativity in learning is not just a nice notion, but an imperative, then educators must find a way to integrate it into a system that has not made this intangible, un-testable attribute a priority. More and more, teachers are becoming alerted to the idea that nurturing creative minds is necessary to raise a generation of innovators. Knowing that it's important is one thing, but integrating creativity into curriculum is harder than it sounds.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Video game invades classroom, scores education points
USA Today
World domination through learning? An alliance of educators and innovators are using a version of "SimCity" to stem students' boredom and electrify future U.S. scientists, engineers and mathematicians. An unprecedented agreement between two influential foundations, leading academics, two global testing firms and the video game industry could redefine how schools teach basic skills.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Advertisement


Demand for wireless networks, tablets will grow, district officials say
Education Week
Over the next three years, district technology officials say they expect to place an increasing emphasis on strengthening wireless networks, and on the use of tablets, a new survey reveals. The percentage of district tech officials who identified tablet usage as a top priority jumped to 40 percent in 2012 from 25 percent a year ago, according to the survey, released by MDR, a provider of marketing information and services for education. Tablets rose to the third-highest area of priority. The second-highest area of priority was server virtualization, cited by 51 percent of respondents.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Studies look into the effectiveness of learning with iPads in one school district
The Coast News
In Lindsay Duncan's class at El Camino Creek in Carlsbad, Calif., one fourth-grade student looked up the definition of "blubber." One girl found a suitable picture of a whale and attached it to her presentation about marine life. Books, paper and pencils weren't in the hands of any of Duncan's students — only iPads. These days, it's a common sight in classrooms throughout the Encinitas Union School District. Every third- through six-grader at EUSD has an iPad, and the district is looking at rolling out more iPads for younger students. Meanwhile, researchers are looking at how the rapidly growing technology is impacting learning.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Climate change science poised to enter nation's classrooms
eSchool News
New national science standards that make the teaching of global warming part of the public school curriculum are slated to be released, potentially ending an era in which climate skepticism has been allowed to seep into the nation’s classrooms. The Next Generation Science Standards were developed by the National Research Council, the National Science Teachers Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the nonprofit Achieve, and more than two dozen states.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Teacher absence as a leading indicator of student achievement
Center for American Progress
On any given school day, up to 40 percent of teachers in New Jersey's Camden City Public Schools are absent from their classrooms. Such a high figure probably would not stand out in parts of the developing world, but it contrasts sharply with the 3 percent national rate of absence for full-time wage and salaried American workers, and the 5.3 percent rate of absence for American teachers overall.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Cheating our children: Suspicious school test scores across the nation
The Atlanta Journal Constitution
Suspicious test scores in roughly 200 school districts resemble those that entangled Atlanta in the biggest cheating scandal in American history, an investigation by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution shows. The newspaper analyzed test results for 69,000 public schools and found high concentrations of suspect math or reading scores in school systems from coast to coast. The findings represent an unprecedented examination of the integrity of school testing.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more



What does 'design thinking' look like in school?
MindShift
Design thinking can seem a bit abstract to teachers. It's not part of traditional teacher training programs and has only recently entered the teachers' vernacular. Design thinking is an approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, conceiving original ideas, lots of experimentation and sometimes building things by hand. But few schools have the time or wherewithal to integrate these processes into the school day.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


5 characteristics of a change agent
Connected Principals
George Couros, a contributor for Connected Principals, writes: "In my work through school and organization visits, I have been fascinated to see the correlation between the speed of change and an individual who is 'leading' the charge. The schools that have someone (or a group of people) helping to push the boundaries of what can be done in schools seem to move a lot quicker with a larger amount of 'buy-in' through the process."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Survey: Principals under more stress (eSchool News)
US schools brace for federal funding cuts (The Washington Post)
Are K-12 teachers bearing the burden of digital innovation? (Digital Book World)
Views of technology differ among elementary, high school educators (Education Week)
Can student-driven learning happen under Common Core? (MindShift)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




First lady Michelle Obama announces Let's Move! Active Schools initiative
The White House
This week, Michelle Obama launched Let’s Move! Active Schools, an initiative to bring physical activity back to America’s schools. The program, for which NAESP is a national partner, provides simple tools to help schools create active environments where students get 60 minutes of physical activity before, during, and after the school day. Mrs. Obama called on school staff, families, and communities to work together to reach an ambitious goal of engaging 50,000 schools in this program over the next five years. Schools are encouraged to sign up at LetsMoveSchools.org, where they will be guided along a simple, six-step process. Participating schools will have access to free tools and resources, including in-person trainings, program activation grants and direct, personal assistance from certified professionals.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Conn., feds allow Newtown students to skip tests
The Associated Press via ABC News
Connecticut and federal education officials are allowing Newtown students to skip standardized testing because of the school shootings that killed 20 first-graders and six educators in December. The state Board of Education and state lawmakers voted to approve measures allowing Newtown children in grades 3 through 8 to skip the Connecticut Mastery Tests that are being administered statewide. Newtown officials had requested the unprecedented, one-time waiver, citing the trauma suffered by students and staff from the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
The Fundamentals for Teaching Smarter

"The Fundamental 5 improves instruction. The power of these practices will transform classrooms and schools," E. Don Brown, NASSP past president. Order now at Amazon.com
Advertisement
Teacher Evaluations Made Easy!

Helping hundreds of school districts improve teacher performance, Halogen eAppraisal Education makes teacher evaluations easy and manageable. Book a
Free Trial of Halogen’s award winning software today.


Should Utah parents get to see teacher performance data?
The Salt Lake Tribune
Lawmakers wrestled with two education bills advocating different answers to the same question: Should the public be allowed to view how individual teachers' students perform? The Senate Education Committee decided yes. Members voted 4-3 in favor of SB133, which clarifies that school performance reports should include such data for public examination online. The average growth scores of a teacher's students, which are based on state tests, would be available beginning next school year. The idea is to help parents and the public see how individual teachers perform compared with others. Individual student data would still be private.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


US probes racial disparities in Seattle school discipline
Reuters
The education department is investigating whether Seattle's public school district discriminates against black students by subjecting them to tougher and more frequent discipline than white students, agency and district officials said. The inquiry, launched in May 2012, is focusing in part on the district's own statistics showing that African-American high school students are suspended or expelled more than three times as often as other students, school officials said.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


States tackle school safety after Sandy Hook shootings
Stateline
In recent weeks, the South Dakota legislature has been rattled over a bill that aims to make schools safer by introducing "school sentinels" — teachers, administrators, security guards or community volunteers who would carry guns to protect their schools. "If you have not heard about the sentinels bill, it's probably time to come out of hibernation," state Sen. Craig Tieszen joked, according to the Argus Leader. The plan, which school districts could adopt voluntarily, passed both chambers of the legislature, despite protest from the state's school board association and most Democrats, and is headed to Gov. Dennis Daugaard.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Louisiana voucher school students taught hippies were dirty, rude, rock-loving Satan-worshippers
The Huffington Post
If Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal loses a legal battle over his school voucher program, his state's tax dollars may no longer go toward sending students to private institutions to learn that hippies were all a bunch of disheveled, drug-addled, godless philistines. While the controversial law remains mired in the courts after being ruled unconstitutional last year, however, Louisiana taxpayers will continue to fund a program that sends poor and middle-income students to private institutions with curricula often determined by controversial and inaccurate textbooks.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
Advertisement
Camp Invention is Preparing Children with
21st Century Skills


The Camp Invention program encourages children to solve real-world problems and present their ideas through science themed, engaging hands-on investigation. For more information: www.campinvention.org, 800.968.4332, or email campatmyschool@invent.org.
Advertisement
Walkthrough Observations Made Easy!

Access The Administrative Observer from your laptop, phone or tablet and give immediate feedback to your staff.
Hear it from a Principal’s Perspective
Summer Time Special! FREE TRIAL


Lost in translation: District's cost-cutting move targets non-English-speaking parents of special needs students
Las Vegas Sun
When his son was diagnosed with autism a few years ago, Fernando Romero worked with the Clark County School District in Nevada to develop a personalized curriculum for the boy. Teachers reviewed test scores and grades, recommended special services and set annual learning goals for Romero's son, now 8. All of the information was written into an Individualized Education Plan, or IEP, a federally mandated contract between parents and schools that governs the education of a special needs child.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Special education expansion brings challenges, hope to Newark school
The Hechinger Report
Four boys and four girls sit quietly along a cafeteria bench, focused on their trays of lunch: turkey with gravy and sweet potatoes, and cartons of 1 percent milk. They are 10 and 11 years old, but one still needs a reminder to use a fork or spoon rather than his fingers with the gravy. Around them, other children glide in and out of their seats, giggling, playing hand-clapping games and otherwise socializing. Occasionally, accidentally, someone running through the aisle bumps one of the eight pupils from behind.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




Webinars spotlight brain-compatible classrooms, school safety
NAESP
You don't need to leave your building to enhance your staff's professional development — NASEP provides high-quality webinars for you and your staff. First, nationally recognized speaker Ken Williams will present Creating Physical and Emotional Security in Schools on Tuesday, March 12. Second, on Tuesday, March 26, David A. Sousa will present What Principals Need to Need to Know About the Basics of Creating Brain-Compatible Classrooms. In it, Sousa will guide you and your staff through a quick tour of how the brain works and how to apply the basics of educational neuroscience to build productive and successful brain-compatible classrooms. Register today.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Apply for USDA's Farm to School grants
NAESP
Every year, the USDA awards up to $5 million in grants to help schools connect with local producers and teach kids where their food comes from. This year, three different kinds of grants will be available. Planning grants are intended for schools just getting started on farm to school activities, while implementation grants are available for schools seeking to augment or expand existing efforts. Proposals are due at midnight on April 24.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 


Before the Bell is a benefit of your membership in the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). For information about other member benefits, visit www.naesp.org or contact us at naesp@naesp.org.

Before the Bell is a digest of the most important news selected for NAESP from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The presence of such advertising does not endorse, or imply endorsement of, any products or services by NAESP. Neither NAESP nor Multiview is liable for the use of or reliance on any information contained in this briefing.

Feedback about an article? Contact NAESP Liaison Meredith Barnett at MBarnett@naesp.org.
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601   Download media kit
This edition of Before the Bell was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here.

NAESP | 1615 Duke Street | Alexandria, VA 22314 | www.naesp.org | 800-386-2377
Recent issues
March 5, 2013
March 1, 2013
Feb. 26, 2013
Feb. 22, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063